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Old 02-13-2018, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
I mean, isn’t ireland part of anglesphere? Don’t they speak English?
Technically yes they are as most of the population speaks English as a first language but they seem to be more interested in keeping their ties to the EU instead of breaking away and forming another block with the rest of the Anglo world.
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I don't think the UK and US are that culturally similar tbh - certainly not in the way we share cultural similarities with Australia and New Zealand, and even then I think certain people overstate the similarities. I think the shared language is by far the biggest aspect - and without it we'd be much more distant from one another.
100% agree. The language of course helps but really US culture is different. Just look at US religiosity and extreme right wing populace. Southerners may be Anglo in ancestry but are so far culturally different as to be from different planets. The northeast US is by far the most British and that pales in comparison to Canada and Australia. Australians and Canadians always look to the UK as the center of their Universe. I have in the US met about 3 Australians in my entire life.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:08 PM
 
901 posts, read 542,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
wasnt referring to slang but canadians use the same terms as americans for most things where as aussies use british terms to describe most everyday things

think of the way the word garage is pronounced , canadians use the american pronunciation , aussies use the british variant

tonnes of other examples

us irish use the english variant more than anyone , only learned recently that in australia and new zealand the word lorry is not used , its truck like in the usa
Umm. No.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,598 posts, read 25,661,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Umm. No.
Well, in terms of how people say "garage", Canadians in English either say "gur-ahdge" or "gur-awjj".


They never say "garridge" which is how the British way sounds to me.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,598 posts, read 25,661,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
The northeast US is by far the most British and that pales in comparison to Canada and Australia. Australians and Canadians always look to the UK as the center of their Universe. I have in the US met about 3 Australians in my entire life.

I wouldn't say that Canadians look to the UK as the centre of their universe. If we're talking in those terms, they definitely look to the US more than any other place.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Overall, Canada and Australia to me seem the most similar overall, with the UK and US being the outliers. But even then there are some pretty significant differences between Aussies and most Canadians I've met. The Canada-US dynamic seems very similar the Aus-NZ match.
There are some similarities between Canadians and Australians in terms or mindset and demeanour, but overall Canada is still way more similar to the U.S. even if many Canadians are wont to admit it.


I also see some traits where Australians seem more similar to Americans, in how they're outspoken, rambunctious and gregarious. Whereas Canadians have a more British-style reserve. (Well, Anglo-Canadian anyway.)
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
In the US we use all three of these terms too although there are several meanings for "cobbler". In the US, it is a certain style of pie, popular in the south and among Black Americans.
I am not a native speaker but I've spoken Canadian English all my life. To me, a cobbler is someone who makes and/or sells shoes.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post

Language is a mixed result, but Aussies notice how many Canadians use “British” terms like “duvet”, “peppers”, or “cobbler” or “British” pronunciation of words like “cafe” or “pasta”.
What other way is there to say "cafe" other than "caff-ay"?


I've noticed that Canadians tend to say "pasta" differently from Americans.


Canadians say "pah-sta" whereas Americans say "paw-sta". The latter being closer to the Italian way of saying it.


Canadians also tend to pronounce the name of the automaker Mazda as "mahz-da" whereas Americans say "mawz-da".


Americans also in my experience say the third letter of the VISA credit card as an S, whereas in Canada it's more of a Z sound.


In Canada, "route" generally sounds exactly like "root", whereas in the U.S. it sounds like "rout".


Of course, your mileage with vary depending on who you talk to, but this is generally how things are.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,598 posts, read 25,661,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
canadian english is far less british orientated than australian english
Well, that's a good example right there.


Canadians wouldn't say "orientated". They'd say "oriented", like the Americans would.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:52 PM
 
901 posts, read 542,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
What other way is there to say "cafe" other than "caff-ay"?
I watched a TV show a few years ago where is was pronounced more like "kaff" like a lot of Brits do in day to day speech. I though it was a one off until I met Canadians here in Australia saying it too. It might be that Aussies, with our more nasal pronunciation and drawn out vowels, stress the final "ay" way more than Brits or Canadians.
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