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Old 02-13-2018, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
19,384 posts, read 24,186,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
I watched a TV show a few years ago where is was pronounced more like "kaff" like a lot of Brits do in day to day speech. I though it was a one off until I met Canadians here in Australia saying it too. It might be that Aussies, with our more nasal pronunciation and drawn out vowels, stress the final "ay" way more than Brits or Canadians.
OK, I've never actually noticed that.


Most English-speaking people in North America seem to say "cafe" pretty much all the same way. I guess it's supposed to sound like the original French way of saying it, but it does differ slightly.


What about "croissant"?

Last edited by Acajack; 02-13-2018 at 01:11 PM..
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:23 PM
 
778 posts, read 447,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
OK, I've never actually noticed that.


Most English-speaking people in North America seem to say "cafe" pretty much all the same way. I guess it's supposed to sound like the original French way of saying it, but it does differ slightly.


What about "croissant"?
We say it as if the 'r' was more of a "w" sound.
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
We say it as if the 'r' was more of a "w" sound.
"kwass-ah(n)" or "kwass-awnt"?
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:27 PM
 
778 posts, read 447,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Two that really stuck out for me were courgette (zucchini) and aubergine (egg plant). The first time i heard those words i had absolutely no idea what they were.
The British term that really confused me most was "turn-ups" rather than cuffs on pants and trousers. And with with British clipped vowels, it did sound a lot like "turnips".
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:30 PM
 
778 posts, read 447,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
"kwass-ah(n)" or "kwass-awnt"?
More like the second but with no or a very soft "t".
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
19,384 posts, read 24,186,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
More like the second but with no or a very soft "t".
Anglo-Canada is all over the map for "croissant" in my experience.


It varies from the stereotypically American "cruss-awnt" all the way to an almost exact replication of the French way of saying it, but with an anglo accent.


In Ottawa which is in Ontario but somewhat influenced by neighbouring Quebec, the French-ish pronunciation is generally what you hear.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:20 PM
 
6,529 posts, read 7,079,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Two that really stuck out for me were courgette (zucchini) and aubergine (egg plant). The first time i heard those words i had absolutely no idea what they were.
you learn something new everyday
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:23 PM
 
6,529 posts, read 7,079,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
100% agree. The language of course helps but really US culture is different. Just look at US religiosity and extreme right wing populace. Southerners may be Anglo in ancestry but are so far culturally different as to be from different planets. The northeast US is by far the most British and that pales in comparison to Canada and Australia. Australians and Canadians always look to the UK as the center of their Universe. I have in the US met about 3 Australians in my entire life.
id have thought the southern usa is more british ? , the north east is where italians , jews , irish , poles , all immigrated to , the south got the scots irish ( who were british ) , i realise places like new england are very WASP,y but the north east is multi cultural to the max

?
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:24 PM
 
6,529 posts, read 7,079,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Umm. No.
if by no you mean YES !
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:26 PM
 
6,529 posts, read 7,079,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
There are some similarities between Canadians and Australians in terms or mindset and demeanour, but overall Canada is still way more similar to the U.S. even if many Canadians are wont to admit it.


I also see some traits where Australians seem more similar to Americans, in how they're outspoken, rambunctious and gregarious. Whereas Canadians have a more British-style reserve. (Well, Anglo-Canadian anyway.)
canadians are more like new zealanders than australians but far more like americans than either
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