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Old 02-13-2018, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
597 posts, read 293,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
German is the most frequently claimed ancestry in the US as a whole as many Germans, Austrians and Low Germans immigrated to the US is larger numbers for a much longer period of time than those of British Ancestry. German influence is one of the things that separates the US from the other Anglo countries. Many of these Germans however Anglicized their names. For example MŁeller became Miller in many cases.
There is some German influence in Australia, especially in South Australia where Germans founded the wine industry, I believe.

My grandfather was half German and lived in the country. DUring World War 1, the government started to intern people with German names. His name was Con, as in Conrad. He and my grandmother moved to Sydney and Con became short for Cornelius. They told everyone their surname was Welsh. My grandparents and even their daughter never deviated from that story, not that surprisingly as WW2 followed the first war all too quickly.

We have quite a few German friends, inevitably with non-German partners. None of their kids speak a word of German, which is a little sad.
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Old 02-14-2018, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,350 posts, read 5,130,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
German is the most frequently claimed ancestry in the US as a whole as many Germans, Austrians and Low Germans immigrated to the US is larger numbers for a much longer period of time than those of British Ancestry. German influence is one of the things that separates the US from the other Anglo countries. Many of these Germans however Anglicized their names. For example MŁeller became Miller in many cases.
Its was no where near as pronounced as the US however Germans certainly did come to Australia, during the early colonial years. They were the biggest non british ancestrial group in the country for a long time.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Australians

I thought canada had a very large german influence?

Last edited by danielsa1775; 02-14-2018 at 01:05 AM..
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Old 02-14-2018, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
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The Empire became the Commonwealth. It still exists in a highly watered down version.
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Old 02-14-2018, 01:48 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,675 posts, read 12,222,099 times
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My area in NZ had a large German settlement during the late 1880s, but many surnames and place names were changed during WW1. Still a few Lutheran churches around.

Also been a steady flow of Germans here since the 1960s - seem to be largely of the "off the grid" persuasion, although not lacking in skills or money.
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:50 AM
 
6,642 posts, read 7,386,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
You might also be interested to know i also had never drank a pint before moving to the UK. Though i had heard the term used before.
let me guess , you drank " jugs " prior to that ?
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Though the southern US is quite British ethnically. At least white people of course.
yes and its dominated by the " scots irish " who were british
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
The white population in Texas is mostly German.
thought the germans were primarily in the mid west ?
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:57 AM
 
6,642 posts, read 7,386,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
German is the most frequently claimed ancestry in the US as a whole as many Germans, Austrians and Low Germans immigrated to the US is larger numbers for a much longer period of time than those of British Ancestry. German influence is one of the things that separates the US from the other Anglo countries. Many of these Germans however Anglicized their names. For example MŁeller became Miller in many cases.
ive heard that claimed statistic about germans being the number one immigrant group but like how in argentina its claimed that italians are number one , is it a case of the founding fathers not being included ? , like with the spanish in argentina , are the british not way out in front in the usa but its a case of them having been the first to arrive and thus became wholly american much quicker than the likes of germans , irish , italians etc and so many have simply stopped remembering where there ancestors came from
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Old 02-14-2018, 03:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
My area in NZ had a large German settlement during the late 1880s, but many surnames and place names were changed during WW1. Still a few Lutheran churches around.

Also been a steady flow of Germans here since the 1960s - seem to be largely of the "off the grid" persuasion, although not lacking in skills or money.
yes , go anywhere in the world and meet someone who is a bit off beat and " off the grid " and they are almost always german

while less common these days , hippy - green culture communes were a feature of parts of rural ireland from about the 1960,s , again nearly always german and to a lesser extent dutch , germans love living in the middle of nowhere in ireland

a particular region of this country has a large enough community of german ancestry going back two centuries , same place as graham norton is from , bandon in west cork
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Old 02-14-2018, 03:10 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,350 posts, read 5,130,275 times
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Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
let me guess , you drank " jugs " prior to that ?
Ha ha. Actually half pints (called pots in queensland) are the staple size west of Brisbane where i grew up. Its normally just to hot to purchase anything bigger (cant drink hot beer can we?) You just stand at the bar and order one every 5 or 10 minutes
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