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Old 02-14-2018, 03:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Not really sure about that. In more remote parts of Australia (most of it) most Aboriginals would be 100% indigenous ancestry, particularly those living in traditional or semi traditional communities where English may be their 2 or 3rd language. The most recently recorded "first contact" between an Aboriginal people and broader society was in the 1960s.

In more heavily populated coastal regions, your statement is more likely to be correct. Also, there are a lot of people with a degree of Aboriginal heritage who do not or may not identify as "Aboriginal'.

New Zealand is a very different scenario, largely because its a much smaller country geographically. In the early days of white settle there was a formally organised war to subdue all Maori due to competition for land.
well in NSW since the late 19th century an majority of Aborigines mixed if you look into colonial records. The last of the pure blood aborigines wore a plate around their neck and were like a celebrity in their community . NSW has the highest population of Aborigines in all the states and territories. Just as all the Victorian and Tasmanian Aborigines are mixed. Sure there are pure blood Aborigines, but they live in the Northern part of Australia and very remote areas.

Also a majority of Aboriginals in relationships have a partner that is non Aboriginal.

The ABS found that “mixed couples as a proportion of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander couples have increased over time from 64% of all couples in 1996 to 70% in 2001, 71% in 2006 and 74% in 2012077.0 - Census of Population and Housing: Understanding the Increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counts, 2006-2011
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Old 02-15-2018, 12:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by other99 View Post
Sure there are pure blood Aborigines, but they live in the Northern part of Australia and very remote areas.
Quite often "very remote" is just a few kms out of towns like Alice Springs or Katherine.
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Old 02-15-2018, 01:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Quite often "very remote" is just a few kms out of towns like Alice Springs or Katherine.
Well the Aborigines there are much more likely to have a first language that is not English and there are those that are unable to speak English. However several generations ago, the so called half casts, were forced to leave their community to move into institutions far away from their family.

Last edited by other99; 02-15-2018 at 02:08 AM..
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Old 02-15-2018, 05:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
A good number of people who immigrated from Europe after the founding of the US right through to the early 20th century were of various German groups. After independence, immigration from Britain was much smaller by comparison. Many things considered very American today were invented or brought over and modified by German immigrants. The influx of Germans early on is in part why the US lost a lot of it's British feel because Germans eventually outnumbered British ancestry. However, as Anglophones were the dominant culture as far as power was concerned, many German immigrants anglicized their names. None the less in some parts of the country, especially the Midwest you run into surnames like Schneider, Kiblinger, Mueller, Ehrich, Geier, Meier, Baum, Baungartner, Volmacher, Meyer, Schilling, Schmidt. Many Smiths, Millers and Snyders were Schmidts, Muellers and Schneiders respectively when they came over.
the industrious nature of america might well be attributed to its very significant german heritage and ancesteral make up , not saying the british were not industrious but the germans are arguably more so
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Old 02-15-2018, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by other99 View Post
Well the Aborigines there are much more likely to have a first language that is not English and there are those that are unable to speak English. However several generations ago, the so called half casts, were forced to leave their community to move into institutions far away from their family.
The northernmost Canadian territory of Nunavut is about 85% Inuit in population, and about 70% of the population has Inuktitut as their main language. So a strong majority of the Inuit up there are primarily native aboriginal language speakers. (Though obviously some Inuit are assimilated and are native English only speakers.)


About 8% of the population of Nunavut speaks only Inuktitut.
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Old 02-15-2018, 09:27 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
the industrious nature of america might well be attributed to its very significant german heritage and ancesteral make up , not saying the british were not industrious but the germans are arguably more so
Good points bob. Henry J Kaiser is a good example. He is descendant from ethnic German immigrants. He was very industrious as a ship builder and steel worker. He founded Kaiser Steel in Richmond, California. He founded the first medical organization, Kaiser Permanente.

Levi Strauss, Eberhard Anheuser, Adolphus Busch, Adolph Coors, Jacob Scheuler are among others.
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Old 02-15-2018, 01:43 PM
 
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Default regarding USA

A country with British roots, which acquired a Germanic imprint. The country now seems to getting a Hispanic imprint as well.
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Old 02-15-2018, 02:52 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
A country with British roots, which acquired a Germanic imprint. The country now seems to getting a Hispanic imprint as well.
Yep, most definitely.
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Old 02-15-2018, 11:30 PM
 
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Its interesting too how 19th century Chinese immigration varied between Aus, Canada and the US (and NZ). Australia is probably the exception in that it wasn't a only "west coast" phenomenon. South Australia was probably the only state that didn't have a large Chinese population mid and/or late century; even Tasmania (as far away from China as you can get in Aus) to this day has reminders of that era.

There was a Chinese new year story on my local radio station, as usual, and I've found it reasonably common for moon cakes or similar to be handed out by anyone with Chinese ancestry or interest in the culture.
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Old 02-16-2018, 12:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The northernmost Canadian territory of Nunavut is about 85% Inuit in population, and about 70% of the population has Inuktitut as their main language. So a strong majority of the Inuit up there are primarily native aboriginal language speakers. (Though obviously some Inuit are assimilated and are native English only speakers.)


About 8% of the population of Nunavut speaks only Inuktitut.
Nunavut seemed a new province of Canada. It is likely that a majority of the people are Inuit.

In the Northern Territory about 15% of people speak Aboriginal languages. If the Northern Territory was spit up and places such as Darwin, Katherine and Alice Springs were not included in the new territory or state, then it be like Nunavut where a majority of people speak indigenous languages.
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