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Old 02-14-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,510,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selen View Post
Neither does Turkish.
Yes, all Uralic and Turkic languages lack gender, and some Indo-European such as Armenian and Persian.
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Old 02-14-2018, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
664 posts, read 611,000 times
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Languages are full of stuff like this. For instance, English doesn't have separate single words for "pájaro" and "ave". Both are translated as "bird". You can translate "pájaro" as "passerine bird", although it's a more technical term.
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Old 02-16-2018, 02:56 PM
 
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In French, "POTATO" is "pomme de terre", literally "earth apple."
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:00 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,138 posts, read 21,392,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Interesting, wonder if there are many examples like these in European languages?
French does not have a separate word for potato. "Pomme de terre" is literally, "apple of the earth". Pomme is apple.
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:11 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
In French, "POTATO" is "pomme de terre", literally "earth apple."
Dammit, didn't see your post
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Old 02-17-2018, 12:58 AM
 
Location: France, Bordeaux
382 posts, read 192,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
French does not have a separate word for potato. "Pomme de terre" is literally, "apple of the earth". Pomme is apple.
We also have the word "patate".
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Old 02-17-2018, 04:58 PM
 
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What is known in English as a "tightrope" in Spanish is "cuerda floja" (slack rope).
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Old 02-17-2018, 05:12 PM
 
5,501 posts, read 3,355,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
French does not have a separate word for potato. "Pomme de terre" is literally, "apple of the earth". Pomme is apple.
This reminds me of Japanese again. Many cultures name new items by describing them in terms of items they are already familiar with. In English, "potato" (the white one) is the basic word, and "sweet potato," being two words, is secondary.

In Japanese, "imo" (sweet potato) is basic, and "jaga imo" (white potato) is secondary.
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Old 02-17-2018, 05:21 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
3,482 posts, read 1,420,746 times
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Default Spuds

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
French does not have a separate word for potato. "Pomme de terre" is literally, "apple of the earth". Pomme is apple.
Yah. Potatoes are out of the New World, & so didn't show up in Europe until the Spanish (1572CE) & British Isles (1582CE?) imported them. With no native production of the potato @ the time, the French had to improvise a name.
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Old 02-17-2018, 05:51 PM
 
5,501 posts, read 3,355,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
Yah. Potatoes are out of the New World, & so didn't show up in Europe until the Spanish (1572CE) & British Isles (1582CE?) imported them. With no native production of the potato @ the time, the French had to improvise a name.
But you do wonder why they didn't just adopt or adapt the word "potato." That's what the English did with the Spanish word (patata).
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