U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-20-2018, 05:35 AM
 
23 posts, read 10,970 times
Reputation: 28

Advertisements

Hello, I've always dreamed about living in the USA and applied for a green card.
I've found that it's cheaper to buy an apartment in St Louis than say Bratislava considering you'll get a higher salary at St Louis. How is that even possible? I just can't, why are we robbed so much in Europe?

And with similar wages, the square meter for an apartment in Minneapolis is almost 400% cheaper than in Munich, considering Germany is one of the cheapest European countries . I used a fairly reliable website comparing costs of living. Sure, food and healthcare are more expensive in the USA but you also get less density and less public transport use (I'd rather walk than use public transport or get a car but European streets are too dense with people to walk undisturbed so I'd rather drive but the car taxes and prices are crazy).
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-20-2018, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Near Luxembourg
1,632 posts, read 640,143 times
Reputation: 977
Quote:
Originally Posted by mihael View Post
Hello, I've always dreamed about living in the USA and applied for a green card.
I've found that it's cheaper to buy an apartment in St Louis than say Bratislava considering you'll get a higher salary at St Louis. How is that even possible? I just can't, why are we robbed so much in Europe?

And with similar wages, the square meter for an apartment in Minneapolis is almost 400% cheaper than in Munich, considering Germany is one of the cheapest European countries . I used a fairly reliable website comparing costs of living. Sure, food and healthcare are more expensive in the USA but you also get less density and less public transport use (I'd rather walk than use public transport or get a car but European streets are too dense with people to walk undisturbed so I'd rather drive but the car taxes and prices are crazy).
Saint-Louis

Lol Go !
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 06:21 AM
 
Location: France, Bordeaux
373 posts, read 169,912 times
Reputation: 433
It is less expensive for several reasons, less construction constraints (insulation, materials, passive housing, etc.), more land available but a lot of urban sprawl (car dependent), less constraints for real estate loans (but subprime mortgage crisis).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 06:21 AM
 
6,561 posts, read 7,219,980 times
Reputation: 4007
planning laws for construction of apartments and houses are much more strict in europe than in the mid west of the usa

sprawl is the end result but outside the cities of new york , san francisco , boston , seatle , housing in america is considerably cheaper than in europe for the most part , i know ive left outside expensive american cities but the point stands
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 06:33 AM
 
3,877 posts, read 5,872,906 times
Reputation: 10260
What, you mean you can't buy something like this for $60k (USD) in Europe?



Old by US standards at 1930, HUGE to me at 2,220sq/ft (204sq/meter) but it's considered tiny by US standards. The reason it's cheap is because I'm in the country, there's limited employment (not none, just limited), and the school system is worse than 'normal' (which is pretty bad by World standards).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 12:10 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,799 posts, read 16,567,096 times
Reputation: 8954
Home ownership is seen as a big deal in the U.S, there is a lot of land and most cities are dominated by single family homes.

Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 02:07 PM
 
537 posts, read 207,261 times
Reputation: 771
Homes in the US are built out of cardboard and plywood, saves costs.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Washington State
13,876 posts, read 7,311,575 times
Reputation: 12197
Quote:
Originally Posted by mihael View Post
Hello, I've always dreamed about living in the USA and applied for a green card.
I've found that it's cheaper to buy an apartment in St Louis than say Bratislava considering you'll get a higher salary at St Louis. How is that even possible? I just can't, why are we robbed so much in Europe?

And with similar wages, the square meter for an apartment in Minneapolis is almost 400% cheaper than in Munich, considering Germany is one of the cheapest European countries . I used a fairly reliable website comparing costs of living. Sure, food and healthcare are more expensive in the USA but you also get less density and less public transport use (I'd rather walk than use public transport or get a car but European streets are too dense with people to walk undisturbed so I'd rather drive but the car taxes and prices are crazy).
Yeah the US has very cheap prices overall and much cheaper housing than Europe or Australia or Canada for that matter. Factors I think are:
- Less restrictions on construction
- Cheaper labor, often illegal Mexican
- We have a lot of buildable land and availability of water
- In some areas, high property taxes limits or drives down the prices
- Some areas, such as St. Louis, have high crime and people have left those areas
- The cheaper areas often have worse climate or poor schools

At the end of the day, it's supply and demand based pricing and the higher demand areas carry higher prices.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 03:52 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
6,042 posts, read 3,408,565 times
Reputation: 4294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
Yeah the US has very cheap prices overall and much cheaper housing than Europe or Australia or Canada for that matter. Factors I think are:
- Less restrictions on construction
- Cheaper labor, often illegal Mexican
- We have a lot of buildable land and availability of water
- In some areas, high property taxes limits or drives down the prices
- Some areas, such as St. Louis, have high crime and people have left those areas
- The cheaper areas often have worse climate or poor schools

At the end of the day, it's supply and demand based pricing and the higher demand areas carry higher prices.
Agree. End of the day, supply and demand is right.

Itís the price of land and how much sought after the location is
along with amenities, services, good paying employment opportunities.

Varies wildly, especially in the US, from very expensive Manhattan to very cheap St. Louis,
there are very good reasons for the differences.

Also quality, USA is a lot of quantity over quality, huge stick framed shoddy built houses,
most builders only build to code, everything else is an upgrade.
In europe, smaller homes but more pride/quality.
In the USA you can get both size and quality if you pay the big bucks for it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2018, 05:18 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
32,262 posts, read 49,828,099 times
Reputation: 80442
Not to forget that even with the, generally, much higher prices of Real Estate in Europe, the incidence of homeownership across the EU is typically greater than the homeownership rate in the United States.

The rate of homeownership across Europe is strongly correlated with the share of homeowners without a mortgage or a housing loan. European countries with higher rates of homeownership also have greater shares of homeowners without a housing loan or a mortgage, and outstanding housing debt. Also the owner-occupancy rates exceed the homeownership rate in the US.
Lots of Americans don't 100% own their (paid off) houses, but make the "ownership" stats look like they are "homeowners".

The 2013 homeownership rate in the US was 65.1%. The proportion of owner-occupied homes that did not have a mortgage, obtained from the 2013 American Housing Survey, was only 36%. Probably lower now.
(I don't have more recent stats, but I don't think there is a substantial difference)

In Europe, most people buy house for life (their life, and the next generations). In the US most people buy (start a mortgage) a house with meaning to resell it in few years, then "buy" another house, and start new mortgage again.
Many people never really own a house (same with cars) but pay mortgage all their life.
The "ownership" idea has completely different meaning.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top