U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-22-2018, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,192 posts, read 9,689,553 times
Reputation: 3592

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Perhaps someone can define liberalism for me.

I think here even if we are not liberal we are laid back. For example, although a considerable percentage of the population did oppose gay marriage in the vote, it is a complete non issue now. There have been a few photos of the first marriages and that has been it.

Religion and politics are almost completely separated here. Religious politicians, and we have a few, rarely mention their views unless it is particularly relevant to an issue, as some thought with the gay marriage vote.

But are you talking about economically liberal or socially liberal?
That would be up to the OP to define (who has created this thread and ran away by the looks of it). I have been only speaking to liberal social policy/ideology.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-22-2018, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Australia
87 posts, read 16,560 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Here the non government school sector, including religious school networks, is funded by government nation wide. So you have large systems of Catholic, Anglican and increasingly other religious schools that are taxpayer funded. A large proportion of kids from all socio-economic backgrounds go to private schools. That seemed to really surprise someone from Nova Scotia I met here not long ago.
The reason this is the case is historical. The earliest schools were run by the churches. Australia has always had a large number of Catholics, many of whom in the past were more working class and mostly of Irish background. The NSW government, at least, in the 19 th century set up public schools but the Catholic system continued to operate, for a long time staffed with nuns and teaching brothers and funded by fees. These schools often were quite disadvantaged and had enormous classes. So in the 1960s there were big campaigns to get government funding for the Catholic system, which probably educated a third of the students in the country. The argument being that these parents could not afford the massive fees of the exclusive private schools, that they paid their taxes and that their kids were disadvantaged.

Now funding is extended to all private schools that meet the regualations in place (which are numerous and funding can and has been stopped to some schools) it is all a contentious issue at times because the very expensive private schools get funding and are able to spend it on luxuries. The funding model keeps changing but there is no call to dismantle the whole system of funding. Much of this money comes from the federal government even though education is primarily a state responsibility.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2018, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,257 posts, read 4,952,751 times
Reputation: 2618
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Even if Civil Unions take care of all or most of the 'practical' things (which looking at Nat's article that appears to not be the case even in a country like Australia), societies aren't just a matter of practical 'things' and policies. It is a matter of doing what is right and that reaches towards equality for all citizens.
I am not legally married in Australia (we were married in Korea and don't have the correct paperwork), and that is pretty much what the whole article talks about. If you are not legally married you have to complete more/different paperwork, to obtain certain things.

Make no mistake I was firmly in favor of marriage equity and the feeling of acceptance that comes with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
10,016 posts, read 7,050,623 times
Reputation: 5446
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
I am not legally married in Australia (we were married in Korea and don't have the correct paperwork), and that is pretty much what the whole article talks about. If you are not legally married you have to complete more/different paperwork, to obtain certain things.

Make no mistake I was firmly in favor of marriage equity and the feeling of acceptance that comes with it.
Good to hear, but Fusion2 was responding to the link I posted in response to your comment

"It ironic that other than the right to marry, and maybe some feel goiod psychology that comes from acceptance.

The only other thing LGBT couples gained from the whole marriage debate was the right to a legal divorce."

That comment rubbed me the wrong way, Intended or not. Marriage is much more than " feel good psychology" and the " right to a legal divorce".

Having to do things differently in regards to paperwork is actually a huge thing, when it comes to equal rights.

Last edited by Natnasci; 04-23-2018 at 01:29 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
10,016 posts, read 7,050,623 times
Reputation: 5446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
After speaking to Canadians in Australia though, Canada does seem to restrict choices available to the broader community on a number of key points, though.

Private health insurance, and hence access to care outside the government run system, seems limited to services not covered by that system. Public funding for schools outside the government run sector seems to be a contentious topic, and not available in many provinces. In those types of issues, Australia seems to offer more choice for the majority of people.

Similarly, Australia's programs for retirement income give the average working person far more opportunity to be self sufficient, and not be dependent on the government of the day, than is the case in New Zealand.
Public funding for schools outside the public system is contentious here in BC. Why? Because the former provincial government was cutting back and closing public schools, at the same time funding for private schools was increased.

https://thetyee.ca/News/2016/05/17/I...Getting-Money/

We have a new government now, so we will see if things should balance out.

I'm with Fusion2 on this. I don't believe public money should go to fund private schools.

I'm not up on Australian's choices on planning for retirement, but here everyone is encouraged to have some financial plan if they are only entitled to the two government pensions, since they aren't enough to live well on. RRSP's RRIF's are two options, plus tax free savings account.

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-age...plan-rrsp.html

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-age...fund-rrif.html

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-age...s-account.html

Plenty of options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,308 posts, read 10,292,126 times
Reputation: 3789
I also agree that private schools should not get public finding... they are private for a reason.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Australia
87 posts, read 16,560 times
Reputation: 122
Here, 35% of students attend private schools and the figure is 41% for high school. So the overall model will not change as the states would not have the facilities to absorb literally milions of students who would not be able to afford their schools if government funding was cut.

Retirement income is provided by a non contributory but means and assets tested government pension available form age of about 66, compulsory superannuation which employers must withhold and pay into funds which generally cannot be accessed until 60, and also voluntary contributions to super. Unfortunately the regulations around super, which has a lot of tax benefits, constantly change.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 04:11 PM
 
787 posts, read 450,163 times
Reputation: 478
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post

Retirement income is provided by a non contributory but means and assets tested government pension available form age of about 66, compulsory superannuation which employers must withhold and pay into funds which generally cannot be accessed until 60, and also voluntary contributions to super. Unfortunately the regulations around super, which has a lot of tax benefits, constantly change.
With superannuation there are incentives for employees to also contribute, making it an attractive saving option for many/most. There is also the option of self managed superannuation funds as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,257 posts, read 4,952,751 times
Reputation: 2618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Good to hear, but Fusion2 was responding to the link I posted in response to your comment

"It ironic that other than the right to marry, and maybe some feel goiod psychology that comes from acceptance.

The only other thing LGBT couples gained from the whole marriage debate was the right to a legal divorce."

That comment rubbed me the wrong way, Intended or not. Marriage is much more than " feel good psychology" and the " right to a legal divorce".

Having to do things differently in regards to paperwork is actually a huge thing, when it comes to equal rights.
Well we will just have to agree to disagree then.
.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2018, 06:21 PM
 
787 posts, read 450,163 times
Reputation: 478
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I also agree that private schools should not get public finding... they are private for a reason.
Here the terms ‘non government’ or ‘independent’ school are also used, which is a better way to describe the vast majority of them. As long as folk are not adverse to their values, they will enroll kids from pretty much any background.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top