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Old 07-13-2018, 10:30 AM
 
Location: New London
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It seems to me based on word of mouth and talking with folks abroad from NB that New England and The Maritimes share a lot of similarities in terms of culture, food, geography, architecture, etc.

Iím a native New Englander and I havenít yet gotten the chance to visit any of Atlantic Canada. Is there anyone in this forum whoís spent a lot of time in both areas and can highlight some similarities and differences between the two regions? Feel free to use whatever criteria you see fit.
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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For clarity it should be noted that The Maritimes does not include Newfoundland/Labrador, but Atlantic Canada does.

I think you probably want to compare The Maritimes, since Newfoundland/Labrador is quite different than New England IMO
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:55 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
It seems to me based on word of mouth and talking with folks abroad from NB that New England and The Maritimes share a lot of similarities in terms of culture, food, geography, architecture, etc.

Iím a native New Englander and I havenít yet gotten the chance to visit any of Atlantic Canada. Is there anyone in this forum whoís spent a lot of time in both areas and can highlight some similarities and differences between the two regions? Feel free to use whatever criteria you see fit.
My experience of the Maritimes is limited but I would say Maine has a lot in common with the Maritimes, the other states have some but nearly not as much.

Maine, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia all have long rocky coastlines with large areas of deeply forested hilly sparsely settled interior. They all have Native Indian populations still living on their ancestral lands.

New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont have some of that but to a much lesser extent. New Hampshire for instance, does not have much have a coastline while Massachusetts is much more densely built up.

One thing that does unite the all Maritimes with New England (except Vermont) is a traditional salt water fishing and maritime culture. I would even say it spreads into nearby New York and especially to Newfoundland.
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
For clarity it should be noted that The Maritimes does not include Newfoundland/Labrador, but Atlantic Canada does.

I think you probably want to compare The Maritimes, since Newfoundland/Labrador is quite different than New England IMO
My picture of Newfoundland is that it is a very sparely populated place with much of the province unsettled. You are literally are living on the edge of civilization.

In contrast, the Maritimes are considerably warmer more hospitable place. For instance, I noticed in Nova Scotia plants similar to what we have on Long Island such as hostas.
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:15 AM
 
Location: New London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
For clarity it should be noted that The Maritimes does not include Newfoundland/Labrador, but Atlantic Canada does.

I think you probably want to compare The Maritimes, since Newfoundland/Labrador is quite different than New England IMO
I understand. I mentioned Atlantic Canada to drive home the point that I havenít visited any of it, and have limited knowledge of the area as a whole.

What exactly makes Newfoundland and Labrador so much different than New England and The Maritimes?
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
It seems to me based on word of mouth and talking with folks abroad from NB that New England and The Maritimes share a lot of similarities in terms of culture, food, geography, architecture, etc.

Iím a native New Englander and I havenít yet gotten the chance to visit any of Atlantic Canada. Is there anyone in this forum whoís spent a lot of time in both areas and can highlight some similarities and differences between the two regions? Feel free to use whatever criteria you see fit.
I have spent a lot of time in both areas, always as a visitor, but never as a resident (from your location I guess you're in CT). I can't really say about 'culture' because my experience is limited to superficial stuff such as: everybody serves clam chowder and lobster rolls and some spoiled brat servers in MA are really rude

By far the biggest difference to me is the number of people who live there, and what that implies. New England has much more significant concentrations of people -- nothing like Boston or the NYC burbs in the Maritimes -- and wealth -- nothing like Newport or Martha's Vineyard or Lenox or even Ogunquit/Kennebunkport in the Maritimes. So that means New England has a lot more man-made sights to see than the Maritimes, and a lot more people want to see them, so everywhere on the coast is overcrowded during the summer unless you go to Midcoast Maine or further northeast. By contrast, except for popular places like Shediac, Cavendish or the Bay of Fundy N.P. (and even then), you won't find anyone in many of the coastal spots in the Maritimes, even the visually appealing spots. Having less people also means that many villages on the coast actually look/are rather poor, so except for a great stretch in SE Nova Scotia you may not find that many spots where you could say "hey that's a really quaint village" unlike all those places New England is really known for.

New England has nothing like Cape Breton Island (and obviously Newfoundland if we include it in the discussion), people love Acadia N.P. and Bar Harbor but I swear it's because Cape Breton Island is just so damn far away (and often has crappy weather). The Bay of Fundy is also great, the tides are impressive. The other national parks in NB and PEI (especially the Greenwich section of PEI N.P.) are spectacular. On the other hand there's nothing like the White Mountains in the Maritimes. Much of New Brunswick is pretty flat and boring, a shame since you need to go through it to get to Nova Scotia (the real highlight IMO, although also the province that looks the most like Maine).
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Northern New England and coastal parts of New England and the Maritimes are pretty similar. Further south you go the more different it becomes. Connecticut is the most different of all. I grew up in Nova Scotia. I haven't spent a lot of time in New England but I have definitely been through there and know a lot of people from there.

Here are some quick similarities that came to mind:

Food is similar along coastal areas. They both make great chowders.

The architecture is similar. The houses look a bit bigger in new England and NE looks wealthier overall.

During the 70s Vermont and Nova Scotia received an influx of hippies and counterculture types that influenced certain areas and that influence has lasted until today. Much less so in Nova Scotia but it is still there. Bernie Sanders moved to Vermont during this period and the leader of the Canadian green party Elizabeth May moved to Nova Scotia from Connecticut during the 70s. The beautiful country side and cheap farm land attracted these people there.

Differences:

There are several big cities in New England, the Maritimes has no big cities.

There are more Blacks and Hispanics in New England. With the exception of a few small Black communities in Nova Scotia, these communities are almost nonexistent in the Maritimes.

The accents are very different.

There are quite a few French speaking communities in the Maritimes.
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,375 posts, read 7,825,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
I understand. I mentioned Atlantic Canada to drive home the point that I havenít visited any of it, and have limited knowledge of the area as a whole.

What exactly makes Newfoundland and Labrador so much different than New England and The Maritimes?
The accent for starters.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqLuIXwsLDw
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:33 AM
 
Location: New London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
My experience of the Maritimes is limited but I would say Maine has a lot in common with the Maritimes, the other states have some but nearly not as much.
My inspiration for creating this thread was actually talking with a man from New Brunswick and finding out that lobster is one of their regional specialties. Furthermore, he claimed that New Brunswick harvests more lobster annually than Maine.

Geographically it makes perfect sense, but I had just never really thought much before about how similar New Brunswick and the other eastern provinces might be to my home area.

Take this photo for example. I could easily imagine seeing this scene or something similar somewhere on Cape Cod, Nantucket, or Cape Ann. For example, this image from Gloucester has a similar look.
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Old 07-13-2018, 01:00 PM
 
2,214 posts, read 3,750,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
My inspiration for creating this thread was actually talking with a man from New Brunswick and finding out that lobster is one of their regional specialties. Furthermore, he claimed that New Brunswick harvests more lobster annually than Maine.

Geographically it makes perfect sense, but I had just never really thought much before about how similar New Brunswick and the other eastern provinces might be to my home area.

Take this photo for example. I could easily imagine seeing this scene or something similar somewhere on Cape Cod, Nantucket, or Cape Ann. For example, this image from Gloucester has a similar look.
That first image is in Peggyís Cove (Nova Scotia) ó as I wrote in my post that part looks more like Maine (Midcoast) and some of the rockier coastal areas, but I think it would be a mistake to generalize. The eastern coast of NB and much of PEI are not much like that.
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