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Old 12-20-2018, 04:06 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
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Just stumbled upon a map of La Plata, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina
La Plata City Map - La Plata Argentina
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Plata
It looks so perfectly symmetrical.
We all know that most cities in the US are designed by grid - they are fairly young, build for cars, easy on direction and traffic. But what cities/neighborhoods in the world look most symmetrical? Any older ones?
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires and La Plata, ARG
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I know La Plata very well ^^ Yes, its original core is very symmetrical (masonery at its fullest), but it sprawled out during its history in a more uneven way, just like Washington DC or Brasilia did.

Another classic example of symmetry is Palmanova, Italy, with a concentric layout of nine sides.
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Old 12-25-2018, 10:52 AM
 
Location: UK
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American cities like LA always seem very symmetrical to me, although they mostly all look the same with similar building design and layout
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Old 12-25-2018, 05:33 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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San Francisco. It is 49 square miles or around 79 square km. It is also pretty much a grid with most streets going either north/south or east/west with a few diagonal streets.
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Old Yesterday, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
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Milwaukee. It grew west-bound only, from the shore, but is laid out in a pretty strict grid, and even the recent freeway overlay forms a box.
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Old Today, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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I think Savannah, Georgia should be motioned as it has a fairly unique street grid.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square...annah,_Georgia
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Old Today, 11:38 AM
 
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Barcelona has a pretty solid amount of gridded surface. Obviously no European city will be as symmetrical and gridded as US cities, but Barcelona is good at this. Another that sticks out is Budapest. The eastern side of the Danube (the Pest side I believe) has a pretty solid radial grid.

Bilbao isn't symmetrical per se but it's quite gridded for European standards. Valencia's center isn't gridded, but the urban neighborhoods just outside the center are quite gridded.

The Scandinavian capitals are pretty good at having grids for how old they are.

In the Americas, Latin American cities often have great street grids. They may not overlap perfectly within the city itself, but look at Mexico City, Santiago, Guayaquil.

There aren't many like La Plata, but some older cities can have surprisingly solid street grids that you would expect more fun a modern city. Now it looks like we've turned away from grids, though, as planned subdivisions throughout the world tend to have loopy/windy suburban streets interspersed with cul de sacs and streets that make 90* angle turns for no reason.
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