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Old 01-11-2019, 10:53 PM
 
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Australia is one of the world's best countries to live in, particularly right now. It is not tangled up in the problems of the Western world due to the distance.

It is safe, diverse, equal, fair, and blessed.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Have you considered other parts of Australia, including regional cities? The experience will be different than Perth, particularly in cites like Darwin or Hobart which have very different mindsets. The cost of living needs to be seen in the context of what you can earn, but there are places in Aus that are better suited to people who aren't that career focussed. It sounds like you'd be better off on the east coast, which would offer more cultural, lifestyle, climate, economic diversity as well.
Hobart it too isolated and Darwin is too. Also, neither of those cities has a pleasant climate. But I do see what you are getting at. I have spent quite some time in Fremantle and enjoyed it even more than I’ve done Perth. I could see myself in a smaller place in Australia. Any more suggestions?

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Originally Posted by bigpaul View Post
if your already in Australia why not stay there? my personal pick would be Canada as a second choice to my home country UK but the wife couldn't put up with the cold there.
I could definitely give Australia a serious try, but it is not very easy to obtain a long-term visa.

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Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
Australia is your best bet of the 3...the USA has a much stronger economy if you had excellent qualifications.

Could you elaborate a little bit on that?


Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
As for the OPs question, if you can get a long term Visa for Australia, I would try and stay if you can as it will reduce moving expenses. The economy there is in very good shape and the salaries are excellent even if cost of living is also pretty high especially with regard to housing. For me personally, I love the warm/mild climate in most of Australia and if you want snow in winter, there are locations like Thredbo and Charlotte Pass not far relatively speaking from Canberra/Sydney that you can go skiing and do other winter activities.
Canada would be a great second choice if you can secure a job ahead of time and I would probably steer clear of the UK with all the instability regarding Brexit at this time. Just my two cents.
Yes, both Australia and Canada seem to outdo UK in terms of economy and lifestyle. But, as it stands right now at least, with the UK we could just move. Canada and Australia require long-term visas, which are not very easy to get. I feel more and more that I should try to get a field-specific job whilst I’m still here. Maybe within a mining company or alike. But I’m more thorn about what to do after my current visa runs out if I do not manage to do so.

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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Canada is closer to Scandinavia, has a fairly similar cost of living to Australia, but is not significantly less materialistic than Down Under is.
I just want a more easy-going place to live. Here most people I’ve met are very money focused. A good salary would give us a better opportunity to work less, though.

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Originally Posted by ilovelondon View Post
So you want to get away from Sweden's "socialism", but you think Canada "lacks social security"

TROLL.
Why would it be impossible for me to want a good welfare state without having socialism? I think that everybody should have access to healthcare, education and feel safe. The rest is up to us. In Europe, most political parties and politicians support welfare, in contrast to the US. I am not very fond of the way our state in Sweden pushes its overly political correct, feministic, homogenous, socialistic crap at its population. Does that mean that I do not support everybody’s need of and access to basic support in regard to healthcare and education? Of course not. I am worried that Canada and Australia may lack in social security in regard to vacation days, parental leave, sick leave and so forth in the way I’m used to. This may or may not be the case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJmann View Post
Was just thinking that.

OP is just bored....
Are you American? If not, what are you talking about? If you are, then it’s time to accept the fact that welfare does not equal socialism. My right to have decent parental leave does not have much to do with socialism. In fact, it was a conservative idea from the beginning (Germany, late 1800s). Stop making stupid comments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shirleyeve View Post
Australia is one of the world's best countries to live in, particularly right now. It is not tangled up in the problems of the Western world due to the distance.

It is safe, diverse, equal, fair, and blessed.
Why would you say that distance matter in this particular matter? I mean everything is so globalised these days anyway. Australia does have strong economy, good weather and lots to do. It does lack a bit of history and culture, but that is not that important. What does worry me the most is the urban sprawl I’ve noticed, its very very high cost of living, lack of environmental thinking, very relaxed drinking culture (especially when it comes to drinking and driving), the “shallowness” I’ve encountered amongst many Aussies and the flies and bugs. And then of course to me personally, the change of seasons, the distance from family and the difficulty in getting a long-term visa.
But you are completely right, I would definitely like to try it down here come the opportunity.
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Old 01-12-2019, 02:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post

Why would you say that distance matter in this particular matter? I mean everything is so globalised these days anyway. Australia does have strong economy, good weather and lots to do. It does lack a bit of history and culture, but that is not that important. What does worry me the most is the urban sprawl I’ve noticed, its very very high cost of living, lack of environmental thinking, very relaxed drinking culture (especially when it comes to drinking and driving), the “shallowness” I’ve encountered amongst many Aussies and the flies and bugs. And then of course to me personally, the change of seasons, the distance from family and the difficulty in getting a long-term visa.
But you are completely right, I would definitely like to try it down here come the opportunity.
Aussies generally don't share their views and attitudes about "deeper" subjects or life stories with strangers or casual acquaintances. That's for friends and family. But if pop culture like tv shows is a guide, we're certainly no more "shallow" than other western counties.
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Australia
506 posts, read 177,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Aussies generally don't share their views and attitudes about "deeper" subjects or life stories with strangers or casual acquaintances. That's for friends and family. But if pop culture like tv shows is a guide, we're certainly no more "shallow" than other western counties.
I agree! In my circles it is regarded as pretty rude to just start sprouting your political views with acquaintances and even friends. And talking about religion is really a taboo compared to many other places. I often threaten my European background DH with all sorts of nasty things if he starts on politics when we are socialising. I have three German friends and their adult kids have long ago trained them the same way.

Why? I think we inherited the British dislike of conflict.

On another tangent, in NSW the attitude to drinking and driving is anything but relaxed. Perhaps it is different in WA but here, gosh , even if you park your car the wrong way round you get a fine of nearly $200. With all the random breath tests, only fools drink and drive in Sydney.

Have you thought of Wollongong? Quite temperate climate, nice small city where many commute by train to Sydney to work, especially to the Sutherland Shire, where the unemployment rate is pretty near the lowest in the country. Housing is slightly cheaper than parts of Sydney and it has lovely beaches. The area between there and southern Sydney includes some beautiful places such as Stanwell Park and Corrimal.
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
I agree! In my circles it is regarded as pretty rude to just start sprouting your political views with acquaintances and even friends. And talking about religion is really a taboo compared to many other places. I often threaten my European background DH with all sorts of nasty things if he starts on politics when we are socialising. I have three German friends and their adult kids have long ago trained them the same way.

Why? I think we inherited the British dislike of conflict.

Possibly. A lot of the religious and political divides in early Australia reflected the Anglo - Irish fault line with its centuries of bitterness. Possibly in those years self absorbed and essentially unreconcilable political or religious debates were viewed as an unwelcome diversion from more pressing matters.

Or perhaps its just an acknowledgement that a random stranger is no more interested in our views on deeper issues than we are in theirs.
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Old 01-13-2019, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Australia
506 posts, read 177,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Possibly. A lot of the religious and political divides in early Australia reflected the Anglo - Irish fault line with its centuries of bitterness. Possibly in those years self absorbed and essentially unreconcilable political or religious debates were viewed as an unwelcome diversion from more pressing matters.

Or perhaps its just an acknowledgement that a random stranger is no more interested in our views on deeper issues than we are in theirs.
Yes, and as I say to DH, people our age are unlikely to change their opinions so it is all a waste of conflict.

I actually think that Aussies are quite friendly when not rushed. We were on a tour for a month in China a couple of years ago. It was interesting seeing new acquaintances sitting around a round table making conversation. The first night, after the obligatory questions about where everyone lived, the conversation led to a long and actually quite interesting discussion of the garden and household insects, reptiles and birds that we all deal with. We had a really friendly group whereas when we have been travelling with Asians, in particular, they seem a little more reserved.

Younger people have no idea what the Anglo Irish conflict was like. My mother was one of the few non Catholics working in a very well known insurance company in Sydney. Discrimination was rampant though not particularly on a social level.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post
I have been doing quite some research on this forum and beyond in an attempt to find a good place for me and my fiancée to emigrate to. We are a young couple in our mid 20s that finished university a couple of months ago. She is a trained physiotherapist and I have a science bachelor’s in environmental science. She has some field-specific work experience, me not so much.
We are from Gothenburg, Sweden but we are currently living in Perth, Australia. The reasons that we are trying to escape Sweden are among others socialism, bad climate, not much to do, vague culture, homogenous people (outside the ghettos in the larger cities) and so forth.

We are down to earth, outdoorsy, traditional/conservative, family-oriented, easy-going sort of people. We are not big on drinking, partying, night life and such. Furthermore, we are not career focused and see our jobs are necessary to uphold a decent lifestyle. But we do not regard it very high and are not too big on material stuff. What we do like is sports, outdoor activities, culture, movies & music, to travel and explore and so forth. We do like the English language and would like to live in an English-speaking country that would provide us with a larger quantity of opportunities to have a better lifestyle and life satisfaction.

We are considering United Kingdom (in particular the east coast and medium sized “historical towns” like Rochester, Lincoln and Durham), Canada (in particular Ontario and the Ottawa region) and Australia (in particular Perth, where we currently reside). Most other English-speaking countries are not interesting for us for cultural, economic, geographical and so forth reasons. We don’t see that New Zealand could offer something that Australia could not, same for Ireland towards UK. The US is a bit tricky as it does have a wide variety of climate, political – and cultural diversity and good economical possibilities. But it is too risky considering the guns and lack of social security, so we are not considering it. It is almost impossible to obtain a green card anyway.

So, between Canada, UK and Australia who has the best:

Job opportunities/economy
Scenery/landscape/outdoor opportunities
Work-life balance/income compared to costs
Climate
Housing/housing opportunities
Visa opportunities/future prospects
Family oriented/family friendly
State benefits/social benefits
Education/healthcare

We could see ourselves in all three countries on way or another, so it is a bit difficult to choose which one to really try out. UK should be the most natural destination as it’s the closest and as it now stands the easiest for us to stay in. But I’ve heard bad things about the economy (cost of things compared to low salaries), the climate (lack of seasons, snow and sunshine), bad housing and all the confusion with Brexit. What worries me about Canada is too much political correctness, too harsh winters, lack of culture and lack of social security. As we’re already in Australia on a working holiday visa we’re considering trying our luck here. But it is very difficult for us to find job within our fields of study and also very difficult to gain a visa to stay permanently. It is also very far from family, very high cost of living and a bit materialistic society.

Most of these are just fears and not necessarily facts. There are a LOT of things we like with all three countries which is why we are considering them as our future home.

WHAT DO YOU THINK, WHICH ONE WOULD SUIT US THE BEST? Thanks
Well if even after the steady dismantling, of what you term socialism, and the steady growth of inequality , see's you still complaining of 'Swedish socialism' , the only place that may suit would be USA.
Of the three countries named, probably Australia, but be warned it looks like a left of centre government will be taking the reigns this year, so ideologically little to continue staying here for.


Why you put down state and social benefits then is rather confusing. Surely you prefer a domain, where it is stand or fall by ones owns efforts?
That would be regardless of government policy and business desire to lower working conditions across the board.


Education? Well look no further that deregulated Sweden to witness a fall in standards, since poorly regulated private schools funded by government money came into play.


A WHV, is just that. No reason, in the main why it should be easy to remain. Although I have met a few that have gone on to het PR. That was during the boom though. neither remain in Australia today.


Too much PC in Canada? Really the States sounds about the only feasible, possible country for you, but expect Sweden will win the day. Denmark not a bad option. People a little more outgoing. Slightly better climate.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Bradpaisley94 View Post


very relaxed drinking culture (especially when it comes to drinking and driving)
This is a joke right?
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Old 01-13-2019, 02:24 AM
 
281 posts, read 341,365 times
Reputation: 323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
Aussies generally don't share their views and attitudes about "deeper" subjects or life stories with strangers or casual acquaintances. That's for friends and family. But if pop culture like tv shows is a guide, we're certainly no more "shallow" than other western counties.
If we are shallow it's because American culture has been lapped up in Australia for far too long. In fact, some studies coming out are even beginning to blame the rise of narcissism on American music and pop culture, i.e. the "culture of Personality". Australia has different values to the States, so it would make sense if its arts industry was funded accordingly to instil some of our own culture back into the limelight.

By the way, have you seen telenovelas in South America? EVERY actor/actress looks like they are models, with glistening skin and perfectly groomed hair. Everybody had to look beautiful. Can you imagine how people in their homes feel when they watch that? I don't think Australia is anywhere near as shallow as Channel Seven or Channel Eleven would have you believe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Younger people have no idea what the Anglo Irish conflict was like. My mother was one of the few non Catholics working in a very well known insurance company in Sydney. Discrimination was rampant though not particularly on a social level.
Do you mean the Irish Catholics vs English protestants?
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by shirleyeve View Post
If we are shallow it's because American culture has been lapped up in Australia for far too long.
I don't think you can really single out American pop culture for shallowness. I can readily think of more than a few tv shows viewable here in Aus that are from other parts of the globe, which are pretty vacuous.
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