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Old 01-25-2019, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,863 posts, read 8,208,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Though there is the question of how easy it is for people to modify their accent to fit in - for some it's not a big deal to erase most cues to their country of origin. That's kinda part of the question I am asking.


Try as they might, the vast majority of Americans couldn't hide their accent to the point where they'd be able to pass for a British person in the UK. (And there are a number of other things that would probably tip people off too.)
That same majority of Americans might find it easier in english speaking Canada, excluding Newfoundland, and parts of the maritimes, to almost pass as Canadian, but only if they have a fairly " neutral " accent. Even then, they would have to study up on terms and sayings that we use, that they don't. I've mentioned this before, but I can usually spot an American pretty fast here in Vancouver. Some, like a friend from New Jersey, lose their accents or gain one, over time. He even has taken on Canadian spelling as well as citizenship. Sometimes I think he is more Canadian than I am ( sometimes immigrants become more patriotic than the locals )

I have a friend from California, who has the standard SoCal accent. Even he doesn't really know exactly what should change in his accent, except for throwing in " eh's", usually in the wrong spot, and trying to shorten his vowels. He usually ends up sounding British, rather than Canadian.

As for Canadians in the US. My guess it's easier overall, since we know a lot about them, and hear their accents all the time. The thing that usually gives me away when I'm in the US, is my shorter vowels, using words like washroom etc. Of course it will depend on which US accent you are trying to do.

The non-verbal clues. Depending on age group. Most people under 40 I would assume dress and look pretty much the same. There are some cliches of how people dress and look, that have some truth to them. Of course humans being human, they still assess people by race. Putting a Asian person next to a caucasian person, and asking which is a local in any non-Asian country, my guess some may assume the caucasian person is the local.

Last edited by Natnasci; 01-25-2019 at 05:08 PM..
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Old 01-25-2019, 05:11 PM
 
10,020 posts, read 7,976,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
London is arguably the most cosmopolitan and racially mixed places on the planet, I am guessing it would be impossible NOT to look like a Londoner. Unless you are green skinned and purple haired then people will assume you are from London (actually even if you have purple hair).
Good points - no green skin or purple hair, though.

The first time I was taken for a local occurred was in 1977, the second in 1985, and London was quite cosmopolitan then - I remember being very surprised at how many middle easterners were in Westminster on my first trip, in 1976. Of course it is even more ethnically diverse now than way back then.
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Old 01-25-2019, 06:18 PM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
632 posts, read 234,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
But what about Austrians in Germany?
I studied German at the university through advanced levels (German literature classes -- I used to really be into languages). I've vacationed in Germany and Austria. My first time in Austria, I was struck how different the German is there. Even the standard Hochdeutsch is different between the two countries. Austrian German is much more melodic and pleasant to the ear than BDR German, IMO. Formal Austrian German has its own vocabulary, too, like words for the months of the year and, I found out, how one says "mushroom" (I like how Austrians say it). I used my school-learnt BDR German everywhere with no problem, but the accents are different and, among themselves, Austrians use dialect. Wienerisch ('Viennese') is completely incomprehensible to me. Plus, the dialect changes as you move from one part of the country to another. Austria is sociolinguistically very complex… much more so than most Francophone and Anglophone countries.
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:52 PM
 
290 posts, read 346,370 times
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New Zealanders in Australia and vice versa, though the locals might discern the differences.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:56 PM
 
308 posts, read 116,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
For what nationalities can i pass?
first photo (blue shirt) like a like Indo- Dutch mixed
not sure you are pure dutch or not
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Old 01-26-2019, 03:18 AM
 
946 posts, read 584,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shirleyeve View Post
New Zealanders in Australia and vice versa, though the locals might discern the differences.
The locals would absolutely discern the difference pretty quickly; vowels are pronounced quite differently and there are vocabulary divergences as well.

Last edited by Bakery Hill; 01-26-2019 at 03:29 AM..
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Old 01-26-2019, 05:57 AM
 
12,397 posts, read 6,461,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iron_stick View Post
Oftentimes Brazilians and Portuguese can be told apart.

The red Christiano Ronaldo 7 World Cup jersey is a dead give-away.
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Old 01-26-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: 59 N
5,124 posts, read 5,672,975 times
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Maybe Germans. They all got a Southern Norwegian type of accent (the Kristiansand area) and their language proficiency is very high. The Swedes and Danes usually keep their language intact and only change a few words to blend in easier.
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Old 01-26-2019, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
16,581 posts, read 12,978,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
The locals would absolutely discern the difference pretty quickly; vowels are pronounced quite differently and there are vocabulary divergences as well.
That's true in general, but I have met the very occasional exception to the rule, whose accent/vocabulary is entirely ambiguous.

There's also a few people who just aren't good with accents -while to most people I know/work with in Aussie, my accent is quickly recognised, there has been the odd person who has been surprised I'm a Kiwi, even after working with them for months
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Old 01-26-2019, 05:06 PM
 
Location: DC metropolitan area
632 posts, read 234,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
That same majority of Americans might find it easier in english speaking Canada, excluding Newfoundland, and parts of the maritimes, to almost pass as Canadian, but only if they have a fairly " neutral " accent. Even then, they would have to study up on terms and sayings that we use, that they don't. I've mentioned this before, but I can usually spot an American pretty fast here in Vancouver. Some, like a friend from New Jersey, lose their accents or gain one, over time. He even has taken on Canadian spelling as well as citizenship. Sometimes I think he is more Canadian than I am ( sometimes immigrants become more patriotic than the locals )
Maine shares more of its border with Canada than any other state and New Englanders settled the Maritimes.

Nevertheless, a lot of Mainers, especially native ones, speak *strangely*. I used to until the Maine-talk got sub-consciously language-policed out of me since having lived away for so long.

This is an example of native Maine-talk:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZDpx1aLovc

I don't think a lot of Mainers could *pass* in Canada once they open their mouths.
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