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Old Yesterday, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,093 posts, read 26,264,499 times
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Are there people who are born and raised in foreign countries who can pass for a born and raised local in your country?


In terms of look, accent, culture?


Either in casual conversations or actually fitting in if they sat down for a dinner with you and your compatriots?


The obvious one is Canada-U.S., with the assertion you often hear that a decent chunk of the population of either country can pass for the other. With some notable exceptions like Québécois, Newfoundlanders and people from the U.S. South.


But what about Austrians in Germany?


Swedish speakers from Finland, in Sweden?


Flemish people in the Netherlands?

Guatemalans in Mexico?


I have thoughts on these but would like to hear your views.
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Old Yesterday, 01:42 PM
 
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Here in Brazil for example I have a Romanian friend who speak decent Portuguese but because his weird accent and slavic look in Sao Paulo people think he is southern Brazilian but not foreigner. The same apply to other Latin Europeans or Latin Americans if they don't have strong accent, the way of being is pretty similar.
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Old Yesterday, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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What about Belarusians in Russia? Most already speak Russian.
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Old Yesterday, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
What about Belarusians in Russia? Most already speak Russian.
Yeah, that might be a good example.
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Old Yesterday, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,093 posts, read 26,264,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVANGELISTTI View Post
Here in Brazil for example I have a Romanian friend who speak decent Portuguese but because his weird accent and slavic look in Sao Paulo people think he is southern Brazilian but not foreigner. The same apply to other Latin Europeans or Latin Americans if they don't have strong accent, the way of being is pretty similar.
What about people from Portugal? Can they easily pass for Brazilians? And vice-versa? (Especially Brazilians primarily of Portuguese origins?)
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Old Yesterday, 02:22 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,638 posts, read 1,363,624 times
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Depends on the region but yes practically any and every Latin European or Latin American can pass for Colombian if they have a neutral Spanish accent. Same with some African or Afro-Caribbean folk also.

There are a few things that are pretty unique or enshrined in pan-Colombian identity though, such as:

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Old Yesterday, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
676 posts, read 635,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Are there people who are born and raised in foreign countries who can pass for a born and raised local in your country?


In terms of look, accent, culture?


Either in casual conversations or actually fitting in if they sat down for a dinner with you and your compatriots?
Uruguayans!
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Old Yesterday, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,093 posts, read 26,264,499 times
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I asked this question because over the years I've heard several first-hand stories of Americans who've had Canadians in their midst for years (as neighbours, work colleagues, "sports" parents, etc.) and never knew they weren't Americans until something triggered the "outing" of the Canadian, like talking about voting and the Canadian tells them they can't because...
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Old Yesterday, 03:11 PM
 
2,188 posts, read 1,225,436 times
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Most people from Scandinavia can easily pass off as American. Minimal accent generally.
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Old Yesterday, 03:40 PM
 
2,090 posts, read 782,388 times
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Indonesians and Malaysians. Both speak the same language with a few variations. Both also have a Chinese community in their country so they cover the same ground there.

While I was in Malaysia, some Indonesians told me that they are of a fairer skin complexion then the Malays, though I’m not sure whether that holds true across the board.

Serbs and Croats are another one. What usually gives one away is the accent.
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