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Old 02-10-2019, 10:22 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,707 posts, read 1,393,793 times
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Perhaps the most topographically challenged city of substantial size...

An interesting University city which peeks out of the central Andes, surrounded by natural thermal baths.

Manizales, Colombia






Manizales Downtown by Mateo Herrera González, on Flickr


Skyline del Cable (Manizales) by Nicolás Ramírez, on Flickr


centro manizalita by Fabiko HLC, on Flickr


Manizales 6866398317_687e9c3e48_b by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


Manizales - Parque Los Yarumos by Sebas Zapata, on Flickr


Manizales by Daniel Echeverri Brando, on Flickr


Centro Historico De Manizales by Patricia Rivera, on Flickr


Gobernación de Caldas Manizales by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


Manizale MiPuebloenVivo-Manizales-Colombia-02 by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


Mi Manizales del Alma by Diego Fernando Vargas Giraldo, on Flickr


Nevado del Ruiz 1199977516_7bee79baf0_b by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr




Manizales 1000975e by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


Manizales 2007-06-12_catedral_de_manizales-pablo_andres_toro_arias by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr




View of the western barrios of Manizales from Chipre by Pouya, on Flickr

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Old 02-10-2019, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
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Montreal may be the largest city that has a mountain right downtown.
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:33 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Manizales

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Old 02-12-2019, 04:20 AM
 
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Colombia just seems to have one constant incredible natural landscape. Really impressive photos.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:47 AM
 
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Re: Montreal, Mont Royal is a very beautiful space, and is certainly unique compared to some cities. But, I think there are larger cities that have similar spots right downtown, depending on how it is defined.

Montreal (pop: 1.7M city, 4.1M region) has Mont Royal 1.6 Miles from it.

Hong Kong (pop: 7.4M) has Victoria Peak has Victoria Peak (taller I believe) only 1.2 Miles from it.

Chongqing at 30.751M right now is apparently the world's most populous city proper and has mountains within 2 miles of it's bustling heart.
https://www.google.com/search?safe=s...u-MeHVK2ZMLTM:

Also in Seoul, 5th largest metropolitan/urban area of world, there are mountains that extend nearly 1000 ft. above the Gangnam District (inside of district actually) which itself, is at or nearly at sea level. Our world has some pretty remarkable spots!
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Old 02-12-2019, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Rome
365 posts, read 315,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Re: Montreal, Mont Royal is a very beautiful space, and is certainly unique compared to some cities. But, I think there are larger cities that have similar spots right downtown, depending on how it is defined.

Montreal (pop: 1.7M city, 4.1M region) has Mont Royal 1.6 Miles from it.

Hong Kong (pop: 7.4M) has Victoria Peak has Victoria Peak (taller I believe) only 1.2 Miles from it.

Chongqing at 30.751M right now is apparently the world's most populous city proper and has mountains within 2 miles of it's bustling heart.
https://www.google.com/search?safe=s...u-MeHVK2ZMLTM:

Also in Seoul, 5th largest metropolitan/urban area of world, there are mountains that extend nearly 1000 ft. above the Gangnam District (inside of district actually) which itself, is at or nearly at sea level. Our world has some pretty remarkable spots!
But those are hills, not mountains.
And furthermore the above mentioned examples are not particularly remarkable.
Turin lies at about 300 m (1000 ft) asl. There are several hills “towering” above the city centre that are 700 m tall (2300 ft).
No Turinese would ever claim their city has “mountains” well within its limits.
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Old 02-13-2019, 06:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dry Heat View Post
But those are hills, not mountains.
And furthermore the above mentioned examples are not particularly remarkable.
Turin lies at about 300 m (1000 ft) asl. There are several hills “towering” above the city centre that are 700 m tall (2300 ft).
No Turinese would ever claim their city has “mountains” well within its limits.
Per National Geographic, a mountain is defined as anything that would exceed 300 M or 1,000 ft.

Montreal, which I believe another poster mentioned, has the Saint Lawrence itself somewhat near sea level elevation (perhaps 20-30'), where Mont Royal is at 761'. Maybe not a huge mountain, but certainly a healthy topographical relief.

Hong Kong is at sea level and Victoria Peak is at over 1,800 feet. Nearby, there are mountains within a few miles of the center that extend to over 3,000 ft. Similarly, Seoul, Taipei, have mountains well exceeding 2,000 ft. within 10 miles of their center.

I think the problem with what you mention, is the art of comparison. Of course, a mountain of 3,000 ft. wouldn't be quite AS mountainous as say the high Andes, Alps, etc. But, anyone who has tried to settle/build, or even hike/view the surrounding landscape would probably acknowledge Hong Kong is a pretty mountainous place, with some really great opportunities to hike and explore. Consider that even the Alps would look puny compared to Himalayas, and Mount Everest would look pretty puny compared to Mars' Mons Olympus. Also consider that one of the oldest mountain ranges in the world are the relatively modest by comparison Appalachians, and that even older yet are the places that almost don't qualify as mountains anymore in the Upper Great Lakes (Iron Mountain, etc.). Yet, at one time, some say those mountains were perhaps as high as Everest. Perhaps in a few billion years Everest will be smaller too, however, I would guess it would still be considered mountainous relative to the surrounding lanscape. So, it is all relative.
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Cannes
2,299 posts, read 1,362,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
Per National Geographic, a mountain is defined as anything that would exceed 300 M or 1,000 ft.

Montreal, which I believe another poster mentioned, has the Saint Lawrence itself somewhat near sea level elevation (perhaps 20-30'), where Mont Royal is at 761'. Maybe not a huge mountain, but certainly a healthy topographical relief.

Hong Kong is at sea level and Victoria Peak is at over 1,800 feet. Nearby, there are mountains within a few miles of the center that extend to over 3,000 ft. Similarly, Seoul, Taipei, have mountains well exceeding 2,000 ft. within 10 miles of their center.

I think the problem with what you mention, is the art of comparison. Of course, a mountain of 3,000 ft. wouldn't be quite AS mountainous as say the high Andes, Alps, etc. But, anyone who has tried to settle/build, or even hike/view the surrounding landscape would probably acknowledge Hong Kong is a pretty mountainous place, with some really great opportunities to hike and explore. Consider that even the Alps would look puny compared to Himalayas, and Mount Everest would look pretty puny compared to Mars' Mons Olympus. Also consider that one of the oldest mountain ranges in the world are the relatively modest by comparison Appalachians, and that even older yet are the places that almost don't qualify as mountains anymore in the Upper Great Lakes (Iron Mountain, etc.). Yet, at one time, some say those mountains were perhaps as high as Everest. Perhaps in a few billion years Everest will be smaller too, however, I would guess it would still be considered mountainous relative to the surrounding lanscape. So, it is all relative.
"I love mountains, so top 3 mountains cities/towns, village and it has to be nearby mountains(over 10.000 ft) so no Pittsburgh and the likes."
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Old Today, 05:56 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
"I love mountains, so top 3 mountains cities/towns, village and it has to be nearby mountains(over 10.000 ft) so no Pittsburgh and the likes."
Is there a minimum size for town / villages?
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