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Old 12-26-2019, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Greater Orlampa CSA
4,594 posts, read 3,873,849 times
Reputation: 3301

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yes, you have differences between Australian cities like, say, Hobart and Darwin, which have their own personalities and styles.


But on this measure I don't think it can compared to the diversity of Canada's metro areas, where out of the top 10 two (including the second-biggest) have French as their operating language, and another operates in English and French across a provincial boundary.


If you go to the top 20 you add another that operates in French, and then two more if you include the top 30. We're talking metros of over 150,000 though some far larger than that. (These are not huge cities but they are of comparable size to Hobart and Darwin.


In the top 10 of our cities you have one (Quebec City) that is reminiscent of a city in northern France with a huge castle in the middle of it overlooking a river and islands from a dramatic promontory.


You also have an almost Asian-style Pacific rim metropolis (Vancouver) with the ocean on one side and snow-capped mountains on the other.


In the top 20 you have a foggy coastal capital (St John's) that is the same distance from Rome as it is from Vancouver, and which looks like an oversized coastal fishing town in Ireland or Norway.
Yeah I guess this is what I meant by this more than saying that Australia doesn't have diverse places, as it more than certainly does-

I guess whether I were to spend a couple weeks going around one or the other-it would depend on taste, as both offer distinctly different things. I enjoy both overall and think they have different strengths-but partially on the strength of Canada having 38 million people vs. 25 million people for Australia, because those numbers aren't all that big, that difference is notable, especially once getting past the first few cities. That isn't to take away from Australia at all-just to say that they have different things to offer. Sure, Canada has more total land overall.. but on a certain level, even less of Canada land is used than Australia's? Because, I think most of the big cities in Canada are within 90 miles of the American border (that excludes Edmonton) and gives a sense of density and continuous settlement on a certain level. I'm curious how frequent or infrequent non air travel is between Australia's big cities, as it's a 9 hour drive from Sydney to Melbourne and 10 hour drive from Sydney to Brisbane.
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Old 12-27-2019, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Various
6,148 posts, read 1,576,967 times
Reputation: 3769
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
I'm curious how frequent or infrequent non air travel is between Australia's big cities, as it's a 9 hour drive from Sydney to Melbourne and 10 hour drive from Sydney to Brisbane.
I have no stats on that, but anecdotally I think most families would have done at least one of those legs in the car. I know some that do the Bne-Syd drive every year at Xmas time. But on the whole I don't think many would be doing those routes regularly for pleasure. In many circumstances it is cheaper to fly.
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Old 12-27-2019, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Australia
1,937 posts, read 831,353 times
Reputation: 3776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussiehoff View Post
I have no stats on that, but anecdotally I think most families would have done at least one of those legs in the car. I know some that do the Bne-Syd drive every year at Xmas time. But on the whole I don't think many would be doing those routes regularly for pleasure. In many circumstances it is cheaper to fly.
When our kids were young everyone drove rather than flew with families. We have done both those trips dozens of times. But these days flying is probably more common, Melb-Syd is one of the world's busiest air routes.
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Old 12-27-2019, 03:56 AM
 
Location: Various
6,148 posts, read 1,576,967 times
Reputation: 3769
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Melb-Syd is one of the world's busiest air routes.
Yep, 2nd busiest domestic flight route in the world and SYD - BNE is at number 12 on the list.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/ericros.../#7104f9031d48
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Old 12-28-2019, 01:50 AM
 
Location: Earth
478 posts, read 472,052 times
Reputation: 529
Gosh these debates are so arbitrary, and they are quickly derailed. As per above post we are talking about "busiest domestic flight routes" which has next to nothing to do with which country "offers more".
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Old 02-18-2021, 08:14 PM
 
132 posts, read 18,588 times
Reputation: 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by backpaker View Post
I absolutely hate US style suburbs, which also seem to dominate the landscape of Canadian and Australian cities, they are like prisons for the soul and places of isolation for the masses.

I find Australian suburbs from what I have read and spoken to people that have visited, to be much more humane than Canadian ones.

From my understanding Australian suburbs actually have some form of public transportation, Enabling people to move around Without having to drive a car, allowing them to interact like humans are supposed to do.

Canadian suburbs are more like American ones, vast expanses of asphalt Void of any culture, Or trace of an actual interactive society.
This is truly spoken by someone who has no idea what American suburbs are like - someone who was fed an inaccurate version of them by someone on city-data who needed some anti-American psychological uplift.

Let's focus on how non-specific your last sentence is: first of all, again, America is a cultural center far more than Australia is, and it's far more populated - it has many more world-famous metros. So to call American suburbs "cultureless" relative to Australia's is just laughable. Who do you think you are?

America's oldest suburban/small town trope is that of the historic "main street USA", where many American suburban residential areas developed outward from, starting as far back as the late 19th century.

In comparison, Canadian and Australian trends of urbanization and suburbanization are much newer and more akin to lot developments in outer suburban regions, having been developed much later than American cities and suburbs.

Accusing American suburbs of being "devoid of culture" while pretending like Australian suburbs have any culture is backwards, if I'm being honest.

Many American metropolitan areas, of which there are a ton, have walkable main streets with small businesses and boutiques located on them all the way to the fringes of their metros. Many small towns in the US are like this, all across the country. I could hardly say the same about Australia or Canada.

The main street culture in the US has a history to it that surpasses any similar suburban and small town lifestyle in Australia or Canada, where outer suburbs were dirty farm towns until recently, when they were turned into bedroom communities.

The presence of asphalt is supposed to mean anything specific here? It's very clear you're casting around for specificity to insult American suburbs without any knowledge or experience of what you are talking about. Your characterization of American suburbia seems to be that which is not at all representative of actual American suburbia - IE, sunbelt style lot developments of the extremely new kind that you find in places like Arizona or Florida.
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Old 02-18-2021, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Australia
1,937 posts, read 831,353 times
Reputation: 3776
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicinterest View Post
This is truly spoken by someone who has no idea what American suburbs are like - someone who was fed an inaccurate version of them by someone on city-data who needed some anti-American psychological uplift.

Let's focus on how non-specific your last sentence is: first of all, again, America is a cultural center far more than Australia is, and it's far more populated - it has many more world-famous metros. So to call American suburbs "cultureless" relative to Australia's is just laughable. Who do you think you are?

America's oldest suburban/small town trope is that of the historic "main street USA", where many American suburban residential areas developed outward from, starting as far back as the late 19th century.

In comparison, Canadian and Australian trends of urbanization and suburbanization are much newer and more akin to lot developments in outer suburban regions, having been developed much later than American cities and suburbs.

Accusing American suburbs of being "devoid of culture" while pretending like Australian suburbs have any culture is backwards, if I'm being honest.

Many American metropolitan areas, of which there are a ton, have walkable main streets with small businesses and boutiques located on them all the way to the fringes of their metros. Many small towns in the US are like this, all across the country. I could hardly say the same about Australia or Canada.

The main street culture in the US has a history to it that surpasses any similar suburban and small town lifestyle in Australia or Canada, where outer suburbs were dirty farm towns until recently, when they were turned into bedroom communities.

The presence of asphalt is supposed to mean anything specific here? It's very clear you're casting around for specificity to insult American suburbs without any knowledge or experience of what you are talking about. Your characterization of American suburbia seems to be that which is not at all representative of actual American suburbia - IE, sunbelt style lot developments of the extremely new kind that you find in places like Arizona or Florida.
Why do you have the need to retrieve old threads all the time, under various user names, which may not even have any more than a passing reference to the US? Then go on the defensive. There are pages and pages of posts which are relevant to the topic of comparing two countries with each other and not to the US. This thread is not about the US, it was about Canada and Australia.
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Old Yesterday, 05:50 AM
 
225 posts, read 235,441 times
Reputation: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicinterest View Post
America's oldest suburban/small town trope is that of the historic "main street USA", where many American suburban residential areas developed outward from, starting as far back as the late 19th century.

The main street culture in the US has a history to it that surpasses any similar suburban and small town lifestyle in Australia or Canada, where outer suburbs were dirty farm towns until recently, when they were turned into bedroom communities.
Here's a playlist of videos around suburban Sydney:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eudv...CrKyGsfxVCn8k3

With regards to Sydney and Melbourne a lot of their suburbs date back to the 19th century. Their suburban rail systems dates back to the mid 19th century.

Last edited by ciTydude123; Yesterday at 06:08 AM..
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Old Today, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,623 posts, read 1,619,019 times
Reputation: 1950
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Why do you have the need to retrieve old threads all the time, under various user names, which may not even have any more than a passing reference to the US? Then go on the defensive. There are pages and pages of posts which are relevant to the topic of comparing two countries with each other and not to the US. This thread is not about the US, it was about Canada and Australia.
His over the top praise of anything American in every thread is so friggin annoying, especially when Canada is involved. This type of extreme “America is the best at everything” behaviour is why so many people around the world have a bad image of Americans, even though most Americans aren’t like that.
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