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Old 05-01-2020, 07:44 PM
 
49 posts, read 15,608 times
Reputation: 20

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Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
Add New Orleans there ( probably.)
As for the rest - ...
You're pretty pathetic. I can't tell French cities apart. Pretty or not, they all mostly look the same, and they are.

There are some noted regional differences, but there are in the US as well.
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Old 05-01-2020, 07:53 PM
 
19,341 posts, read 16,036,290 times
Reputation: 8361
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellatrixwand View Post
Parking lots exist in European cities. They also don't negate architectural dynamism and diversity. And chain stores are present ALL OVER EUROPE.

Europe has a collection of large cities with historic downtowns, historic smaller towns, etc, but it has parking lots and chain stores and highways EVERYWHERE, and a number of cities that are modernist and boring,

You need to get over yourself. Your last statement is ironic; your feelings are clearly hurt that people don't admit Europe is the pinnacle of society.

I didn't insult and denigrate Europe. You're basically insulting and denigrating the US by ignoring the subject of the argument, which is about architectural diversity, not about subjective attractiveness, and by attacking the US for elements that are ubiquitous across every western nation.

That's what I am talking about in this case - the architectural diversity ( or rather lack of thereof) in the US. You seem to be implying something else in the process of discussion, since you switch the subject to some "pinnacle of society."


Quote:
Europe has some gorgeous cities surrounded by atrociously ugly development consisting of dystopian tower blocks and attached, boxy suburban homes. At least the US has cultivated aesthetic suburbs and residential housing, which Europe has utterly neglected to do.

I've traveled throughout Europe and within multiple European countries. You have highways, parking lots, and big box stores across your suburban areas, small towns, and many of your large cities.

Stop being a gross hypocrite. European cities aren't that diverse. Many are pretty, but European cities don't have dynamism in modern architecture, and they protect an array of indigenous architectural styles jealously - IE, many don't represent a cross-cultural array of influences, and many aren't that global and culturally distinct on a large scale, due to their reduced size.

This very "dynamism in modern architecture" is precisely what makes American cities look all the same.
The cookie cutter.

Quote:
I didn't say France or Spain wasn't diverse, might I add. I have no idea why you're arrogant self is getting mad that I didn't admit that the United States was basically culturally inferior to the entire continent of Europe in every way.

This is why I utterly avoid Europe. Been there, done that. You people have such bad attitudes, and you're some of the most prejudiced, conservative, condescending, hypocritical, and provincial people on earth - and you fancy yourselves enlightened, liberal, and accepting! LOL.
What?
I personally come from one of the most "backwards, conservative and unaccepting" places on Earth.

But what it has got to do with the architecture?
Now I am loling for real)))
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Old 05-01-2020, 08:07 PM
 
49 posts, read 15,608 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
That's what I am talking about in this case - the architectural diversity ( or rather lack of thereof) in the US. You seem to be implying something else in the process of discussion, since you switch the subject to some "pinnacle of society."



This very "dynamism in modern architecture" is precisely what makes American cities look all the same.
The cookie cutter.


What?
I personally come from one of the most "backwards, conservative and unaccepting" places on Earth.

But what it has got to do with the architecture?
Now I am loling for real)))
This is just a nonsense, contradictory post.

You're making bland imputations and generalizations about American cities, and I'm citing specific examples, as was OP.

American cities don't look "cookie cutter" any more than older European cities do. The difference is, European countries tend to have a limited array of national styles and that's it - with all the parking lots and highways you're deriding.

Europe is also architecturally and developmentally hideous outside of city centers in ways that America is not, at least not as entirely. European residential architecture, in the contemporary sense, is nonexistent. It's hideous. Its dystopian and entirely uninspired.

Your rants about "parking lots" and "big box stores" have nothing to do with architectural diversity. The presence of these things doesn't negate that the US has a diverse array of colonial, indigenous, and transplanted architectural styles, a massive variety of geographic features and climate types, an extremely diverse geography and ethnic population, and therefore, an eclectic array of differently designed cities with great internal diversity in architecture, from the modern to the colonial to some cases of the native/ancient, with some cities and towns built mostly in one of the three styles, or cities developed as a mix of them.

You're just insufferably arrogant to set your argument upon the premise that America has parking lots and big box stores in it's metropolitan areas and Europe doesn't because that's...not at all true. The presence of Carrefours in France means that France doesn't have architectural diversity all of a sudden? Last I checked, Paris has motorways traversing into it, as well as at least a few parking lots and garages...
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Old 05-01-2020, 08:21 PM
 
19,341 posts, read 16,036,290 times
Reputation: 8361
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellatrixwand View Post
This is just a nonsense, contradictory post.

You're making bland imputations and generalizations about American cities, and I'm citing specific examples, as was OP.

American cities don't look "cookie cutter" any more than older European cities do. The difference is, European countries tend to have a limited array of national styles and that's it - with all the parking lots and highways you're deriding.

Europe is also architecturally and developmentally hideous outside of city centers in ways that America is not, at least not as entirely. European residential architecture, in the contemporary sense, is nonexistent. It's hideous. Its dystopian and entirely uninspired.

Your rants about "parking lots" and "big box stores" have nothing to do with architectural diversity. The presence of these things doesn't negate that the US has a diverse array of colonial, indigenous, and transplanted architectural styles, a massive variety of geographic features and climate types, an extremely diverse geography and ethnic population, and therefore, an eclectic array of differently designed cities with great internal diversity in architecture, from the modern to the colonial to some cases of the native/ancient, with some cities and towns built mostly in one of the three styles, or cities developed as a mix of them.

You're just insufferably arrogant to set your argument upon the premise that America has parking lots and big box stores in it's metropolitan areas and Europe doesn't because that's...not at all true. The presence of Carrefours in France means that France doesn't have architectural diversity all of a sudden? Last I checked, Paris has motorways traversing into it, as well as at least a few parking lots and garages...




Sure.
( I hope Grammarly helped you a great deal, while you were writing your essays. )
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Old 05-01-2020, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,771 posts, read 3,019,004 times
Reputation: 3358
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
Add New Orleans there ( probably.)
As for the rest - ...
That’s still more cities that have their own architecture than most countries. I do agree that as far as city layout goes most American cities are a carbon copy of each other, but the actual buildings vary quite a bit from one region to the next.
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Old 05-01-2020, 08:49 PM
 
19,341 posts, read 16,036,290 times
Reputation: 8361
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
That’s still more cities that have their own architecture than most countries. I do agree that as far as city layout goes most American cities are a carbon copy of each other, but the actual buildings vary quite a bit from one region to the next.

Four that you can distinguish out of 200 or so, made with cookie cutter?

I don't think so.
That's not what you call ermm.. " unique city architectural pairing."
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Old 05-01-2020, 09:06 PM
 
Location: London, UK
3,785 posts, read 2,264,110 times
Reputation: 2266
Quote:
Originally Posted by bellatrixwand View Post
You're pretty pathetic. I can't tell French cities apart. Pretty or not, they all mostly look the same, and they are.

There are some noted regional differences, but there are in the US as well.
Google Strasbourg and then google Nice, then if you dare, google Bordeaux.

I do think the US is regionally varied as well, it just has some cookie cutter aspects whereby there's an evident overall blueprint which brings the diversity peg down one but not two.
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Old 05-01-2020, 09:14 PM
 
49 posts, read 15,608 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
Four that you can distinguish out of 200 or so, made with cookie cutter?

I don't think so.
That's not what you call ermm.. " unique city architectural pairing."
Dude, you're an Anti-American. Made clear by the fact that it was someone suggesting that American cities were at all diverse from one to the next that made you comment negative stuff exclusively about America because it's cities have stuff like "parking lots", "big box stores" and "asphalt", stuff that is common all across the west.

Layout is a negligible part of what makes a city diverse in the first place. Impugning that American cities are not architecturally diverse because the US has highways and big box stores is NONSENSICAL. Every western country does. How many times do I need to spell it out for you?

The biggest, ugliest parking lot in the world could be located right in the center of a city that has remarkable skyscrapers in tons of different styles and a variety of colonial architecture. It doesn't make the architecture of that city all of a sudden less unique.

There's also way more than 200 cities in the US, and your broken English is silly. "Made with cookie cutter" - is not how American cities were made. There's a common trend of grid-based cities in the US, that doesn't make cities "cookie cutter". That basic layout has nothing to do with how architecturally diverse each city is, and has very little to do with how different architecturally one city is from another. So get over it.

The last sentence in your post makes no sense. You evidently know very little of American cities, or at least don't know how to level a proper argument against them.
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Old 05-01-2020, 09:32 PM
 
49 posts, read 15,608 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Google Strasbourg and then google Nice, then if you dare, google Bordeaux.

I do think the US is regionally varied as well, it just has some cookie cutter aspects whereby there's an evident overall blueprint which brings the diversity peg down one but not two.
Look outside any city center in France, and compare to the variety of residential architecture seen in a variety of American suburbs. It's usually way more varied and way more tasteful in America.

Google Santa Fe, then google Vail, then google Charleston, then google the Over-the-Rhine district of Cincinnati, then google Deadwood, South Dakota, then google San Francisco, then google Avalon on Santa Catalina, then google Portland, Oregon, then google Miami, then google Key West, then google New Orleans, then google Boston, then Chicago, then Bisbee, then San Antonio, then Jackson Hole, then Saint Augustine, Florida, then Solvang, then Las Vegas, then google New York City, then google Nashville, then google Hot Springs, Arkansas, Asheville, North Carolina, and Ojai, California.

Google street scenes of all of these, preferably.

Many of these cities share basic commonalities that many industrialized, modern cities do, but then again, so do Strasbourg and Nice and Bordeaux (the latter two are architecturally mostly similar). All of these cities and towns are diverse, and different in culture and architecture and development to one another.

I think I said, quite succinctly, that I did consider France architecturally diverse, and I cited the Mediterranean region and the German-inspired east as evidence. That said, there isn't anywhere near as much modern dynamism in French architecture, there isn't quite as wide an array of geographic and climatic influences, and unique ethnic influences aren't as plentiful.

I don't consider France as developmentally diverse as the US. There's not a "blueprint" for American cities anymore than there is one for French or British or Japanese cities - There's sometimes a favored layout, that doesn't make a country's array of cities less diverse...
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Old 05-01-2020, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,771 posts, read 3,019,004 times
Reputation: 3358
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
Four that you can distinguish out of 200 or so, made with cookie cutter?

I don't think so.
That's not what you call ermm.. " unique city architectural pairing."
I agree that American suburbs are not unique from one metropolitan area to next, they are all essentially the same (though sometimes the building media changes), however the city centers, particularly the older parts of town can very quite a bit, and probably more so than any one specific country in Europe.

New Orleans
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.9588...7i13312!8i6656

Santa Fe
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.6875...7i13312!8i6656

San Francisco
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.8023...7i16384!8i8192

Boston
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3652...7i16384!8i8192

Charleston
https://www.google.com/maps/@32.7767...7i16384!8i8192

Baltimore
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.2975...7i16384!8i8192

Washington
https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8973...7i16384!8i8192
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