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Old 02-10-2021, 01:34 PM
 
Location: London, UK
3,784 posts, read 2,260,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
I decided to do some wiki-diving on some of this. Interesting factoid, one of the most known songs in America out of Britain during the decade, “Champagne Supernova”, wasn’t released as a single over there. We didn’t even consume a band as popular as Oasis in the same way.
That is indeed interesting but undoubtedly Oasis was still somewhat niche in the US-American market and only really became somewhat popular later on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bitey View Post
Mostly because Britpop -- just as the name implies -- was part of a broader domestic-focused cultural movement and not just a detached musical genre, similar to how the "Madchester"-era bands that preceded Britpop were strongly tied to the "Northern working-class chic" cultural phenomenon that just didn't translate the same way outside the UK.
What about other prominent elements of British 90's musical culture? Britpop was only a part of Brit music at the time and whilst some of it was quirky a lot of the songs were music classics with wide appeal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
of course they have , both australia and New Zealand have always be more in touch with British artists than americans have ,the UK , australia , new zealand and ireland are in the same sphere musically and culturally , Westlife ( truly awful band ) were big in both Australia and New Zealand , they are unheard of in America

acts like Oasis and especially Blur were quite english and when an act is " too english " , it often struggles to " break america "

i like the music of the 1980,s but it had a pretty generic sound which was easily acceptable to americans or anyone else , Britpop had a much quirkier vibe which didnt as easily cross the atlantic
Again the focus on Britpop.
There were plenty of more generic sounds in 90's Britain pop/soul/r&b/urban that didn't find acceptance either.

P.s. Westlife was ok, i disliked them at the time but I do consider two of their songs classics; the one with Mariah and princess Diana's favourite song, wings or something like that.
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Old 02-10-2021, 01:58 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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^^
Just to re-iterate above on the pop/r&b/urban front..

In assembly in primary school we used to have choir battles to this song. This was repeated in primary schools across the country yet this song did little outside of Europe & NZ...

Eternal




What about boybands that were all the rage in the 90's? Yet again East 17 did little outside Russia & Europe and Take That only a little more.

East 17




Garage & Drum n Bass did little outside of Europe too, acts like Artful Dodger, Mis-Teeq, So Solid Crew, Miss Dynamite, etc. It diverged a little from the generic sound with the Dn'B/2-step focused elements but not so much to be alien to outside ears.

Artful Dodger



Mis-Teeq




Even the greats Jamiroquai found lacklustre audiences in most North American festivals until much later when he had brief exposure.

Jamiroquai




Going back to the Irish front bob raised I think it's was a simmilar scenario to British artists. Irish artists were massive in the UK but didn't do as much elsewhere with the exception of U2 and Westlife to a point. Artists like the Corrs, Boyzone, Snow Patrol (that godawful Bewitched girl group), etc. Even Ireland's only Black 90's pop act Samantha Mumba found success namely in the UK and not much elsewhere.

Samantha Mumba

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Old 02-10-2021, 02:03 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TOkidd View Post
I don’t know about other parts of Canada, but in the 90’s it was widely stated that Toronto was one of the biggest Jungle/D&B cities outside London. Delirium, Syrous when they first brought Kenny Ken over...the scene got huge, with some great production companies. In the late-90’s, big jams with British DJs like Nicky Blackmarket, Mickey Finn, Kenny Ken, Congo Natty, and MCs like Skibadee, Shabba, Stevie Hyper D, Navi, and others could bring in crowds of thousands for a single party. Toronto also had its own Jungle scene, with well-known DJs like Marcus, Tommy Illfinga, Lush, Medicine Muffin, and so on. There was an underground scene in small clubs, which is mostly what I was into, and the big party scene where attendance of 10,000 on a Saturday night wasn’t unusual. Not only that, but you could catch Jungle/D&B DJs pretty much every night of the week at clubs that catered almost exclusively to the scene.

The thing is, it didn’t last long. The scene lasted from like 91-2001, but only got huge around 97. Between house, techno, and Jungle/D&B, Jungle/D&B was king of the hill for two or three years, between maybe 98 and 2001. Then the scene changed, the music changed, the clubs kind of disappeared, and that was it. Some of my best memories are of hitting raves and clubs in the mid-late 90’s, many with British headliners
Brilliant! Great to know Toronto at least had a rich Jungle/Dn'B movement.
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Old 02-10-2021, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Seattle
2,521 posts, read 812,972 times
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If you all can grant me an "ok Boomer" moment for just a moment LOL....


I think another good question is why did the world, especially of late, sleep on good music? Sure it exists but the mainstream music they play on the radio is absolute garbage! Yes, you can still find good music but you gotta know where to look!


I'm old enough to remember the late 70s, 80s and 90s and all one had to do is turn on the radio and be bombarded with good tunes. Boy those days are long gone. It's really a shame! These young kids wouldn't know good music if it hit them in the chin.
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Old 02-10-2021, 05:37 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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^^

Lol that's what your mama & papa or at least nana said about Elvis and his devil music. Although as a millenial I'm getting old and find myself agreeing with you. Boy what world are we in where millenials are now getting on! Life is indeed too short.

In any case the Brits will save us...The Brit Awards past 2 years..





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Old 02-10-2021, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX, born + raised SF Bay
4,459 posts, read 1,760,531 times
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I didn’t realize we did. Oasis and The Verve were huge parts of my childhood - to this day, The Verve’s Urban Hymns is without any showdown of a doubt the album I have played and played and played the most. Jamiroqai was fun. There’s been a few others whom I had no idea were British.

I guess it lacked the whole craze of the previous few decades, but I’ve never really seen Britain as lacking either talent or star power in music.

Last edited by jcp123; 02-10-2021 at 05:53 PM..
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Old 02-10-2021, 05:46 PM
 
Location: North America
3,541 posts, read 1,230,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
From Soul to Jungle to Rock to Britpop, the 90's was a defining moment in cool Britania and British music.

Why was the success largely only Europe-wide with little impact in Canada & Aus and hardly none in tge he US until much later with small cult followings cropping up.

The lack of acceptance was especially true for Black British artists. Did the UK change too much from its stereotypical image that the world just turned its back? I would be interested in hearing some theories.
Oh, please...

The United Kingdom ranks 21st globally in population. It had (in the 1990s) and has more musical influence and reach than every last one of the ~175 smaller countries, and more musical influence than all but one of the countries with more people (the exception being the United States).
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Old 02-10-2021, 06:45 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2x3x29x41 View Post
Oh, please...

The United Kingdom ranks 21st globally in population. It had (in the 1990s) and has more musical influence and reach than every last one of the ~175 smaller countries, and more musical influence than all but one of the countries with more people (the exception being the United States).
I get what you're saying but if you lived through the 90's & early 2000's not knowing who Eternal, East 17, Miss Dynamite, Stereophonics, Supergrass, Artful Dodger, Blur, Gabrielle, Craig David, the Prodigy, Lighthouse family or Skunk Anansie were, or hearing their songs, then you didn't experience 90's Britain.

It would be the equivalent of the UK not knowing about Alanis Morisette, Green Day, Puff Daddy, Blink 182, N-Sync, Run DMC, Moby or LeAnn Rimes.
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Old 02-10-2021, 07:11 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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For those that didn't experience the late 90's/early 00's Garage/Dn'B/Dub UK sound some new(ish) fresh tracks. Even Idris Elba is in on it!
Come to think of it Jamaican music had wider appeal in the UK in the 90's than elsewhere too (besides perhaps Canada). The same goes for Afrobeat now.

Old sounds in modern times..

Jorja Smith




Craig David
In N.America & Aus they cruise around in their 4x4s while in UK we do the shopping cart haha.




Wiley, Idris Elba, Steff London, Sean Paul

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Old 02-10-2021, 07:42 PM
 
Location: In the heights
28,683 posts, read 27,900,293 times
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Is it actually true the world slept on 90s British music? It's a country that had a tiny proportion of the world's population in the 90s and many, many of the artists had international hits abroad with maybe more than any other country aside from the far more populous US.
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