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Old 02-10-2021, 10:51 AM
 
Location: In the heights
36,881 posts, read 38,781,820 times
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Pre-pandemic, and post-pandemic hopefully, NYC actually has multiple busy centers aside from that of Lower Manhattan and Midtown. Those are the busiest overall, but you still have incredibly dense and bustling parts outside of that such as around Bedford Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the dense neighborhoods of Jackson Heights and Elmhurst around Roosevelt Avenue, downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO, and downtown Flushing.
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Old 02-10-2021, 10:56 AM
 
Location: On the Waterfront
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
False. That's a misconception that many Americans have. There's greater London, which would be comparable to the 5 boroughs, and then there's London metropolitan area, which has a population estimate that goes as high as 18 million.

New York metro, the tri-state area or MSA, has a population of around 21 million. The US also uses a CSA (combined statistical area), which pulls into account commuting patterns and so forth. That population is around 23 million.

The UK doesn't us a CSA type measurement, but either way, New Yorks MSA is not even close to twice the size of Londons. New York is at 21 million, and London is at 18 million.
Not false. Greater London (which is what you wrote) is made up of 33 districts. Just because they don't use CSA terminology doesn't change the fact of the land area that it covers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_London

Greater London's land area is 607 square miles. Compared that to the 5 boros which is about 302 square miles.

So even if you're saying this is only for the City of London (Greater London according to you) that would mean London needs twice as much land area as NYC to achieve almost the same population. This totally contradicts what you're saying about London feeling like the much more populated city even if the city proper itself is a little bigger. The land areas numbers do not back up your argument at all.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:02 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
8,017 posts, read 7,392,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Pre-pandemic, and post-pandemic hopefully, NYC actually has multiple busy centers aside from that of Lower Manhattan and Midtown. Those are the busiest overall, but you still have incredibly dense and bustling parts outside of that such as around Bedford Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, the dense neighborhoods of Jackson Heights and Elmhurst around Roosevelt Avenue, downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO, and downtown Flushing.
The "rebirth" of Brooklyn, does add to NYC's profile/image tremendously.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
21,420 posts, read 12,376,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCity76 View Post
Greater London would imply the metro area. Just like greater New York implies the metro area. So of course the greater London area would be bigger than the city proper of the 5 boros of NYC.

NYC's Metro population isn't just larger, I believe it's twice the size of London's.

Regardless if the city proper of London is bigger geographically, which it is by a substantial margin, it's still nothing like NYC. Two totally different animals. And while London is fun and a great city in its own right, NYC definitely feels like the larger, more densely urban, badass, alpha city.
This is my take
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
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London has high amount of Parkland and it never hits peak density like Manhattan so it can’t compete in the short distance but once you remove the parks land and the Staten-Island-esque edges of the city it’s more comparable. From a density perspective. Also London is nowhere near 18 million people. It’s more like 14.5 million. NYC is 20 million+ because Americans really super-commute 90 miles. British people generally don’t do that. Hence why Manchester and Liverpool are still colloquially treated like separate cities, when in America they would have been treated as one ages ago.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:06 AM
 
156 posts, read 169,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
This is my take
Yes, that's because Americans harbor a misconception that I listed earlier.

Furthermore, London is growing like crazy currently, whereas New York is losing population.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:13 AM
 
156 posts, read 169,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
True New York metro size is about 18 million, true London metro size is about 14 million or a bit more the size of LA.
And the 14 million number is on the lower end... Some estimates put it as high as 18 million. Either way New Yorks metro area is nowhere near twice the population of Londons...

And moreover, London is experiencing tremendous grow, whereas New York is losing population.

I wouldn't be surprised if the next census records New York at just below 8 million.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
21,420 posts, read 12,376,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
Yes, that's because Americans harbor a misconception that I listed earlier.

Furthermore, London is growing like crazy currently, whereas New York is losing population.
NYC is a (much) bigger metro and the built form is more impressive. Nevermind its CSA has 21M+ people. I think this is pretty subjective.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
21,420 posts, read 12,376,083 times
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I feel like NYC has tons of people I lots of areas. I spent a weekend in Bensonhurst/ Bath beach and it was lit.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.6183...7i13312!8i6656

White Plains Road, Bronx: https://www.google.com/maps/place/21...2!4d-73.867382
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:39 AM
 
4,133 posts, read 2,760,233 times
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When I travel to NY I stay in a fairly concentrated area. Midtown Manhattan basically has 90% of everything I’m interested in. London is so much more spread out. It might pack a similar punch, but I’m traveling further out to get a similar experience.

That said, I prefer London to NY. It’s just built differently which I think may be skewing your perception.
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