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Old 02-11-2021, 11:37 AM
 
125 posts, read 41,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCity76 View Post
Another wannabe who hates NY so much that he claims to have lived here and yet knows nothing about it. Yet at the same time claims to think London is superior and "on another level"

What a joker.
This guy is really, really hurt...hahahah

"Mama Gina, dis guy said he likes London betta den New Yawk, and I'm really upset. Will youse make me some cannolis so I can stop crying. Mama, why is da world such a cruel place?" ....LMAOOO

This has been very entertaining.
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Old 02-11-2021, 11:40 AM
 
125 posts, read 41,519 times
Reputation: 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
TBH - most Londoners have a close affinity to NYC, and even a great deal of love for their sister city.

Both cities are fantastic cities and both are vast cities.

Which one someone prefers is merely down to personal opinion and personal preference.

The difference between the cities make them more interesting and they are both better at different things, as well as having many things they both excel at.
- Very true, great post. Both cities are world class, and it all comes down to preference. I just feel that London is a superior city along several important metrics...but I get that others don't agree. That's not hating on New York, it's simply an informed opinion. NY is still a great town.

What's funny are the people who get upset and cry about someones difference of opinion.
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Old 02-11-2021, 11:48 AM
 
Location: East Boston, MA
9,789 posts, read 17,746,412 times
Reputation: 11453
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Believe it or not, NYC is actually more spread out than people give it credit for. I agree to an extent when putting Manhattan up against London. Overall I think the separate boroughs/bridges/tunnels give NYC a more broken up feeling than London. Central London is an absolute beast when it comes to vibrancy, and it's seamless. London is extremely impressive on all levels, tourist attractions, transit, neighborhoods etc. etc. I also give London an edge on NYC in shopping/retail. NYC may have more volume due to multiple locations of the same stores, but London was breathtaking from a retail standpoint IMO.
London and NYC are both dense and spread out at the same time. They're both megacities. The big difference is scale. There's nothing in London that comes close to the scale of Midtown Manhattan. The buildings are taller, the streets are wider, and that adds to the feeling of immensity you get in Manhattan. London actually doesn't match New York in terms of population density, but for the pedestrian on the street, it can actually feel more bustling and that's the result of London's scale. The buildings are smaller, but they're incredibly tightly packed, apartments/flats often have even less square footage than you'll find in NYC, and narrower, winding streets pack people, cars, cyclists, etc. tighter together in a smaller space which adds to the feeling of critical mass on London's streets even if there aren't necessarily more people there.

London's irregular street grid adds to this feeling. Most of New York (even outside of Manhattan) is on a grid whereas London's street network is spaghetti. And because London's built environment is so tightly packed, "things" are tucked away in unexpected places (well, unexpected if you're American) like under overpasses and bridges, down alleyways, and in random nooks all throughout the city. I think it adds to the sense of "tightness" you get in London.

While London is far more culturally comparable to New York, I think the "feel" of the city in some ways has more in common with Tokyo which has a similarly erratic street layout, is equally great (maybe even better) at utilizing every nook and cranny, and funnels crowds through tight, winding streets with narrow sidewalks. London and Tokyo are very different cities, but there are definitely some similarities in how you experience them on the street level.

Quote:
The retail in Heathrow airport alone, would be top tier for an entire American metro area.
All over Europe, Airports are definitely a lot more like shopping malls than American airports. Many have limited or zero seating near the gate areas, forcing passengers to wait in the retail areas (London and all of the UK/Ireland isn't actually as bad as many European cities on this front). It's a surprising (and sometimes frustrating when you're tired/broke after a trip) for many visitors.
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:03 PM
 
Location: In the heights
28,791 posts, read 27,984,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
- Very true, great post. Both cities are world class, and it all comes down to preference. I just feel that London is a superior city along several important metrics...but I get that others don't agree. That's not hating on New York, it's simply an informed opinion. NY is still a great town.

What's funny are the people who get upset and cry about someones difference of opinion.

Right, that makes sense, but where it's not preference are in regards to London's size. For one, it's unlikely that London's population, as in the ceremonial county of Greater London often just called London as shorthand, is actually at 9.4 million people. The source you're citing goes on to cite the UK's ONS which puts its estimate at 8.9 million. You also ignore that London's municipal borders encompasses about twice the land area that NYC does--so in that sense, yes, London is larger, but it also less dense and substantially less dense at its core.
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Old 02-11-2021, 10:18 PM
 
2,145 posts, read 934,468 times
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Decided to look at the boroughs. The densest London borough is Tower Hamlets at a little over 42,000 people per square mile. That covers an area of roughly 7 square miles. The densest NYC borough is Manhattan with a little under 70,000 people per square mile. It covers an area of 23 square miles. Bronx (42 sq miles) and Brooklyn (71 sq miles) would be the 4th and 5th densest boroughs in London, sandwiched between Hackney (7 sq miles) and Kensington& Chelsea (5 sq miles).

That’s the way goes. Basically you could find a patch of 7 square miles of London that was roughly as dense as the 140 square miles that is Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Bronx. But there is no London equivalent to Manhattan directly. And honestly that’s ok. London’s strengths aren’t in demographics, but elsewhere.
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Old 02-12-2021, 03:13 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
16,950 posts, read 6,240,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heel82 View Post
Decided to look at the boroughs. The densest London borough is Tower Hamlets at a little over 42,000 people per square mile. That covers an area of roughly 7 square miles. The densest NYC borough is Manhattan with a little under 70,000 people per square mile. It covers an area of 23 square miles. Bronx (42 sq miles) and Brooklyn (71 sq miles) would be the 4th and 5th densest boroughs in London, sandwiched between Hackney (7 sq miles) and Kensington& Chelsea (5 sq miles).

That’s the way goes. Basically you could find a patch of 7 square miles of London that was roughly as dense as the 140 square miles that is Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Bronx. But there is no London equivalent to Manhattan directly. And honestly that’s ok. London’s strengths aren’t in demographics, but elsewhere.


A lot of London is green space, it's a city with vast parks, indeed it has over 3,000 public parks.

Roughly 47% of Greater London is 'green'; 33% of London is natural habitats within open space according to surveyed habitat information (and an additional 14% is estimated to be vegetated private, domestic garden land.

NYC also has it's green spaces, and such green areas are important in order to keep sane in a large urban environment.

Some areas are more built up, however in terms of skyscrapers this can mean financial districts rather than residential.
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Old 02-13-2021, 02:41 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
2,208 posts, read 1,591,405 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
I was in London last March, right before Covid changed everything, and I couldn't get over the dense crowds all throughout the city, and I'm not just talking about the usual areas around Buckingham palace, Oxford street and Picadilly Circus... London is packed throughout...

I'm a native New Yorker, grew up there. I live in Florida now but I go back to visit friends and family 3 - 4x a year. I flew from JFK to Heathrow last March, and I set it up so that I could stay in New York for the week prior, to visit family and have a little fun...

After a few days in London, I came away with the feeling that London is a much more populated city than New York...which is funny, because a decade ago, it felt the opposite; New York felt significantly more populated...but not anymore.

So I decided to look up the most current population estimates for both cities. I used worldpopulationreview.com and a few other sources to check the numbers, and lo and behold my feeling was right. -- New York has actually lost several hundred thousand people over the past number of years and stands at a 2021 population of 8.23 million. London on the other hand has grown tremendously and currently stands at a population 9.425 million; over 1.2 million more people than New York!... And you can really feel it walking the streets and taking public transportation.

If we're talking about metropolitan areas, New York is still larger...but if you're comparing greater London to the 5 boroughs, London is the much larger city....

Go London! What an epic town...
New York City is 300 square miles and Greater London is 607 square miles, so this analysis would get you kicked out of grad school. Your numbers are also way off. New York is estimated at 8,336,817 in 2019. In the 2010 Census, it was 8,175,133. You gathered data from "a few other sources" but didn't go to literally the only one that counts: the Census Bureau. Why gather data from a crappy source like World PopulationReview when Census QuickFacts is right there?

If you truly wanted to compare the two, you'd see how many people live in the most central 607 square miles of New York's metropolitan area.

Doing that gets us:
  • Clifton: 85,052 (11 square miles)
  • Essex County: 798,975 (126 square miles)
  • Hudson County: 672,391 (46 square miles)
  • New York: 8,336,817 (300 square miles)
  • Passaic: 69,703 (3 square miles)
  • Paterson: 145,233 (8 square miles)
  • Union County - Summit: 534,444 (95 square miles)
  • Yonkers: 200,370 (18 square miles)
GREATER NEW YORK: 10,842,985 (607 square miles)

GREATER LONDON: 8,899,375 (607 square miles)

Shocking, Greater London's entire "lead" was simply having an arbitrary municipal boundary that capture 300 more square miles of area. New York is still larger by nearly 2 million people. And I wasn't even being selective about what was added to Greater New York. If you wanted to capture the densest 607 square miles of New York, you'd be closer to 11.5 million since you'd be adding all those super dense towns in Bergen County along the Hudson, southern Westchester County, and the Nassau townships closest to Queens.

So the gap is arguably even bigger than what I noted above.
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Old 02-13-2021, 02:56 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
2,208 posts, read 1,591,405 times
Reputation: 3013
The other fun part is this, how many square miles does New York need to exceed Greater London's "massive" population?

Answer: 325 square miles.
  • Cliffside Park: 26,133 (1 square mile)
  • Fairview: 14,189 (1 square mile)
  • Guttenberg: 11,121 (0 square miles)
  • Hoboken: 52,677 (1 square mile)
  • Jersey City: 262,075 (15 square miles)
  • Mount Vernon: 67,345 (4 square miles)
  • New York: 8,336,817 (300 square miles)
  • Union City: 67,982 (1 square mile)
  • Weehawken: 14,638 (1 square mile)
  • West New York: 52,723 (1 square mile)

TOTAL: 8,905,700 (325 square miles) 27,402 people per square mile

GREATER LONDON: 8,899,375 (607 square miles) 14,661 people per square mile

The inner 325 square miles of New York has more people than Greater London's 607!

Imagine opening a thread to attack the city you "supposedly" grew up in, yet you failed to do even the most basic research and all your crowing is easily torn apart by numbers you can Google in 3 minutes lol
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Old 02-13-2021, 03:36 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, Commonwealth of Virginia
2,208 posts, read 1,591,405 times
Reputation: 3013
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCity76 View Post
You're a New Yorker who needed to come back here to check out the city before heading off to London for a comparison? LOL Riiight.

I got news for you...Any true New Yorker worth their salt doesn't need to spend another week in the city if they're originally from here. Take that from someone who lives here and stares out on the city all day, every day.

Another fugazzi trying too hard lol
The whole story is just so laughably absurd that I decided to dig deeper into this whimsical last-minute adventure in London as COVID-19 was rapidly spreading throughout Europe.

So let's rewind. OP 'magically' goes to London in March 2020, which he then claims is "before COVID." This is false.

The first case in London was in February 12 and there were already deaths by March 1. COVID-19 was all over the news by March 1 and the Russell 2000 had dropped 13% from its February peak by March 1.

By early March, London was essentially in panic mode and by mid-March the entire city was quickly unraveling as cases were spiking:

Source #1: https://www.usnews.com/news/world/ar...bit-more-in-uk

Source #2: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-51910748

At no point during March was London full of "dense crowds all throughout the city" because here is where the world stood on February 29: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...y-virus-update

He then says, "I flew from JFK to Heathrow last March" which is awfully convenient considering flights from the U.K. to the U.S. were banned on March 14. How opportune! Let me guess: he got on the last flight back to America? But even better, he stayed in New York the week prior to have some "fun," even though COVID was 24/7 news on ABC, CBS, CNN, Fox, NBC, and PBS. For someone who's a New York native, he sure picked a weird time to get reacquainted with his hometown.

Oh, and the best part. He loved London so much that he waited 11 months to tell us all about his experience and is now cheerleading about London in every response. Did he just magically remember he visited London in March?

OK, I lied, here's the best part. I did a little digging and our supposed native New Yorker has a long history of trashing New York in every thread:

So either OP is a self-loather or a foreigner (British or Canadian) pretending to be American so he appears less suspicious. Either way, it's clear from his previous posts that he's not the sweet angelic personality that he tried to pass off as in his first post (though from his responses since, I think he took off his mask too soon). You had a good run OP, but the truth has set us free
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Old 02-13-2021, 08:04 AM
 
1,131 posts, read 2,288,675 times
Reputation: 1284
Now that the implications of Brexit are being realized full-force, I predict that London is going to start to seem smaller and smaller and smaller and ... European stock trading, for example, is already shifting to Amsterdam and derivative creation is well on its way to being centered in NYC.
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