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Old 05-12-2008, 01:46 AM
 
Location: San Diego
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I'm guessing there will be a lot of Canadian and Australian cities in the mix, but then again, I don't know, so help me out. Thanks!
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Old 05-12-2008, 03:16 AM
 
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Singapore feels like an American city, despite the large Asian population. English is widely spoken, and you'll find a lot of the American chain restaraunts there (i.e. Fridays, Outback, even a Hooters). The CBD of Sing. looks like a cleaner version of downtown Los Angeles.

Otherwise, Perth and Sydney feel pretty American, as well as Vancouver.
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Old 05-12-2008, 07:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAandATL View Post
Singapore feels like an American city, despite the large Asian population. English is widely spoken, and you'll find a lot of the American chain restaraunts there (i.e. Fridays, Outback, even a Hooters). The CBD of Sing. looks like a cleaner version of downtown Los Angeles.

Otherwise, Perth and Sydney feel pretty American, as well as Vancouver.
I definitely agree with Singapore. It's one reason I don't really like going there.

Brussels feels very American. Other than a few historic neighborhoods and the Grand'Place, it's loaded with freeways, modern high-rises, suburbs, fast food joints (even with drive-thrus), and there's English everywhere because the Francophones don't like the Flemish and the Flemish don't like the Francophones.
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Old 05-12-2008, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Brussels DOES feel very American. Felt like Philadelphia. Dublin also made me feel like I could have been in an American city on the East Coast. Sort of industrial feel with lots of brick buildings.

Traditionally though, I've heard Australian cities are the most similar to the U.S. - both VERY car-culture oriented.
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Old 05-12-2008, 09:15 AM
 
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When I was in Auckland, NZ it felt like I was in Florida.
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Old 05-13-2008, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Brusssels
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Helsinki had the architechture and open feel of an American city (East Coast). Cologne also has the look/feel/vibe of an American city.
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Old 05-13-2008, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
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Some of the larger, economically developed cities in Northern Mexico (Hermosillo, Monterrey, Chihuahua, Torreon, Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosi) have inherited the sprawl type residential and retail developments of the southwestern USA. I'm not saying this is pretty. I'm simply saying parts of these cities have taken on the look and feel of poorly planned southwestern USA sprawl. The dry landscape, sparse vegetation, similar architecture and bright sun have something to do with the resemblance too.
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Old 05-14-2008, 12:21 AM
 
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Are you sure? Helsinki remind me of many gloomy Eastern European cities. I guess the OP should have made an introduction stating what gives the feeling of an American city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpat View Post
Helsinki had the architechture and open feel of an American city (East Coast). Cologne also has the look/feel/vibe of an American city.
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Old 05-14-2008, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Burkina Faso
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Canada is so much like the U.S. it's not even worth mentioning.

The suburban bits of the Netherlands vaguely reminded me of Ohio.
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Old 05-16-2008, 12:16 PM
 
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Funny...the suburban Netherlands reminded me of Connecticut. Also, most Dutch speak perfect Americanized English. I think a lot of Scandinavia is also similar culturally to the US. In Germany, maybe Frankfurt and Heidelberg. Brussells felt very European to me, I wouldn't include it in this category at all.

Mexican cities (well, I've only been to Cancun) obviously have a lot in common with Sunbelt cities in the US as well.
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