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Old 11-01-2021, 04:51 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Following on a discussion from another thread, I'm interested to see some of the Cowboy cultures of the world. With the advent of possible less meat consumption and a pivot to vegetarianism or veganism these cultures could hold less significance towards the end of this century.

Aside from handling cattle, many of these cultures have developed their own cultural expressions through dress, music, dance and typically a heavy red meat diet. Many a time these are substantially different from other national cultures.
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Old 11-01-2021, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Great Britain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Following on a discussion from another thread, I'm interested to see some of the Cowboy cultures of the world. With the advent of possible less meat consumption and a pivot to vegetarianism or veganism these cultures could hold less significance towards the end of this century.

Aside from handling cattle, many of these cultures have developed their own cultural expressions through dress, music, dance and typically a heavy red meat diet. Many a time these are substantially different from other national cultures.
I once knew a cowboy builder.
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Old 11-01-2021, 06:41 PM
 
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What do you want to know. There are huge differences between cattle farming in Texas and summer ranges in the Bavarian Alps. Been there
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Old 11-01-2021, 06:42 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
I once knew a cowboy builder.
Scum of the Earth.

Hopefully the cowboy cultures being presented will be more respectable? - Maybe not?
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Old 11-01-2021, 07:17 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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The cowboy culture I'm most familiar with is LLANERO culture from The Llanos. A northern South American grasslands the size of Germany which encompasses mostly the river Orinoco basin, the world's 3rd largest river, which straddle Venezuela and Colombia. As well as a cattle ranching region you can find safari wildlife such as Pumas, Jaguars, Anteaters, Pink Dolphins, Capybaras, Eagles, Anacondas, Owls, Ibises, Deer, Capybaras, Armadillos, Caymans and many others. It's a 'Global 200' biome region of the planet.

The dance and music is characterised by a Harp, Cuatro (4-stringed guitar) & Maracas. The genre is called Joropo and the dance is fast paced with intricate footwork. During the independence movement these hardy horsemen and lancers were the bulk of the Cavalry and were decisive in winning the wars for independence. The region also has its own unique mythology characterised by various monstrums. The region is also home to 7+ indigenous tribes of mainly Arawakan, Guajiboan & Carib peoples, many of whom don't speak Spanish.

The traditional dishes are the Mamona which is massive cuts of Veal on pikes that poke out from the ground around a fire which are continually marinated in beer. Also the Capybara is a sought after delicacy and is so delicious and tender.

Los Llanos


Llanotitle by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


volando by Smallest Forest, on Flickr


Paso de río by AlcaldiadeYopal, on Flickr


Cachaceros by Gabriel Rojas, on Flickr


El Arpista by Alfonso Giraldo, on Flickr
Cachos al Amanecer by Alfonso Giraldo, on Flickr


Gonzalo el arpista by Alfonso Giraldo, on Flickr


Giant Anteater by Roger Manrique, on Flickr


Casanare Hato La Aurora 3743827_orig by Pueblo Fuerte, on Flickr


Altillanura
by Juan Manuel Cardona Granda, on Flickr


Oasis by Juanita Uchiha Cubbins, on Flickr


Monstrums



Llanos Promo




Joropo Dance





Joropo Music

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Old 11-03-2021, 01:09 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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The UK's Eden project in Cornwall has just announced at COP26 that it will open an Eden Project in the Llanos region of Colombia. The first of seven globally. This is great news for the advancement of knowledge, promotion & research into conservation.

It gladdens me to see there are some people and institutions that do know and value the Llanos region.


Eden Project plans to open new site in Colombia | Cornwall Live



Last edited by Pueblofuerte; 11-03-2021 at 02:20 PM..
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Old 11-03-2021, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
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Cattle ranching in the Americas started with the first horses and cattle brought by the Spanish. Don't ask me how those animals made the voyages. If you see how small these boats were you understand the mystery. Hence, the first cowboys of the Americas probably are Dominican ones or, more exactly, ancestors of many current Dominicans. From the island it spread to the rest of the Americas.

This is a replica of a boat in the 15th century. The first horses and cattle to the Americas sail across the Atlantic Ocean in boats of similar size. If it was a cramp space for humans who understand what was going on, imagine for animal thst doesn't understand.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhABSaRURHQ

Though the very first horses arrived at La Isabela on the north coast of Hispaniola (now hardly ruins within a national park), most of the rest arrived to the main town on the south coast of Santo Domingo, the oldest city founded by Europeans in the Americas. These boats docked on the port right next to the Ozama River (it means deep water in the Taino language, it has nothing to do with the Arab terrorist.)

A drawing of Santo Domingo circa the 1500's or 1600's.

https://twitter.com/javierleoncio49/...231538176?s=20

View from Google Earth of Santo Domingo today.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sa...c587b82715c164

Before the Spanish arrived, there were no horses, cattle, sheeps, pigs, chickens, etc anywhere in the Americas. That means there were no cowboys either.

Naturally, with the arrivals of the horses and cattle came the husbandry composed by Spaniards and African men. The direct descendants of these horses and cattles still exist on the island. Somewhat modified as the animals adapted to their new terrain and have become smaller (something scientists noticed about animals that arrive on islands and stay there for generation), but they are sturdy and capable of not getting tired too quickly in the tropical heat.

A tourist and a guide on horseback while vacationing in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. Native horses of Hispaniola are direct descendants of the first horses brought to the Americas from Spain over 500 years ago. Tourists from North America and Europe immediately notice they are smaller than the ones at home.

https://www.afar.com/places/centro-e...ana-punta-cana

Needless to say, a cattle ranching culture developed, perhaps the first one in the Americas too. The center of cattle ranching, which is one of the oldest economic activities on the island, became what now is known as "Los Llanos" or "Llanura de Santo Domingo" or "Llanura del Caribe" (take you pick), the largest plains in the Caribbean outside Cuba. This area spans from the Santo Domingo area all the way to the Punta Cana area in an east to west direction and covers most of the East except the northern edge which is interrupted by the Oriental Mountains. In colonial times this was known as "Llanura de los Castellanos" (Castilians Plains) and post that era "Llanura del Seibo."

A landing of an airplane at Punta Cana International Airport. Much of the approach and final for landing is over the most eastern part of the "Los Llanos." The area is a mix of mostly cattle ranch, sugar cane plantations and natural vegitation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_hwVe9jF_A

Dominican activities surrounding cattle ranching and cowboys include the following (again, these were introduced by the Spanish, so these are some of the oldest traditions on the island and all of the Americas for that matter.) On many of these dvents, though not all, these are horses and/or cattle imported from other parts in North, Central and South America and their descendants, others are a mix between the local variety and the imported ones. The end result is that they are bigger and more muscular, in many cases even hairier, that the native ones.

Cabalgatas. These are done everywhere, some even march into Santo Domingo. Imagine that, a major city with its main avenues experiencing a "traffic jam" of large quantities of cowboys (and cowgirls) on their horses. This is down mainly with native horses.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPzeWWH4Elg

Competitions. The main venue is the Feria Ganadera in Santo Domingo, but there are other venues near towns and city in the interior of the country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SDJ7uF79fs

The winner!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo0iPgwN-XA

Amazing place. A competition while you eat/drink!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZ843-e_2Ew

Kids training a horse on a Dominican horse ranch. I can see the tradition will continue for generations.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIzgKOmAwJA

In El Seibo is the only place in the Caribbean where bullfighting is still practiced. Again, one of the oldest traditions, though in colonial times the animal was killed (as its still done in Spain, Mexico, Colombia, Peru, etc.) It's prohibited to kill the animal or physically hurt him. In anycase, bullfighting is outlawed everywhere in the DR except here. Bullfighting also used to take place in Puerto Rico, but the Americans put an end to that. A similar thing took place in Cuba.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ndHzn8f-qI

Rodeo still takes place at the Ciudad Ganadera in Santo Domingo.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlpNgiI0tao

Showing horses at the Ciudad Ganadera in Santo Domingo. Competitions are also held with cowboys and their horses from other countries such as Colombia (in fact, the speaker in this video has an obvious Colombian accent), Puerto Rico, etc. Dominican cowboys abd their horses also go to competitions in those places too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj-C77oaAII

Well, I guess people get the point. lol
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Old 11-04-2021, 09:47 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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I remember travelling through that region of DR on my way to Punta Cana. I did see some livestock.

One of the things which I was told about the DR is that food is far less pricey than in other islands of the Caribbean because they're able to grow and rear most of their own food.

I would like to know more of the geographical extent of this ecosystem though? When I type in ”Llanura del Caribe” all I get is the coastal plains of Colombia's Caribbean region in all search engines, wikipedia, etc.. This is of course an important grasslands for cattle also but much less iconic than the actual Los Llanos Savannah which is a vast geological area in northern South America.

I found a handful of info when I typed in "Llanuras de Santo Domingo" but is there something like a wikipedia page with more specific details? e.g. Area, geography, economy, geology, main towns, etc.
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Old 11-04-2021, 09:51 AM
 
Location: London, UK
4,098 posts, read 3,742,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep2 View Post
What do you want to know. There are huge differences between cattle farming in Texas and summer ranges in the Bavarian Alps. Been there
Well what you can present and know of each. Area, geography, population, towns and cities, culture, music, history, folklore, myths & legends, attire, gastronomy are just some examples.
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Old 11-04-2021, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
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Part 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
One of the things which I was told about the DR is that food is far less pricey than in other islands of the Caribbean because they're able to grow and rear most of their own food.
Yes, but most are produced in the Cibao Valley, because it has the best soil and climate for that. It's basically the breadbasket of the country.

In the Los Llanos it's mostly cattle ranches and sugarcane plantations. Almost all the sugar and molasses is exported to the United States. The DR has a sugar quota with the USA, the latters offer a price higher than the world market in addition to meeting a minimum of sugar and molasses production headed to the USA. There have been times when 100% of the sugar and molasses produced in the DR is exported to the USA and sugar/molasses is imported from Brazil for the Dominican market. Imagine going to a supermarket in say La Romana and all the sugar is imported when outside the town is the edge of one of the largest sugarcane plantations in the world (for a long time the Central Romana was the largest sugar mill in the world and now is either the second or third largest, the large chimneys seen in La Romana near the southern end is from that sugar mill.) The Americans are the ones that created much of the current sugar industry in the DR, with the first truly large sugarcane plantation created in the late 1870's by the Massachussets native William Bassto supply entirely the US market. So basically, from the start big sugar in the DR has been tied to the USA. If sugar production existed solely to supply the Dominican market, maybe 5% of the current land devoted to sugarcane would be under sugar production and much of it on the outskirts of Santo Domingo.

On the other hand, cattle/horses production which is an industry started by the Spanish in the early 1500's abd is one of the oldest economic activities, for centuries the main one during the colonial period and after, is almost entirely focused on the Dominican market. Very little is exported. For a time in the colonial period the export of cow hide became relevant, mostly because of the abundance of cow. This was exported almost completely to Spain snd from there to satisfy Europe's demand for leather -shoes, belts, etc.) For about a century in colonial times the sector, mostly domestically focused, did had an important export business to neighboring Saint-Domingue. The French always had a severe shortage of horses and cattle which were needed in the production of sugar, which was their biggest money maker. The Spanish/Dominicans had an overabundance of horses and cattle, so once the Spanish Monarchy authorize Santo Domingo to do business with Saint-Domingue, the main exports were horses and cattle. That ended with Haiti's independence over 200 years ago and since then it has been almost entirely locally focused. This includes all aspects of the cattle from cow hide, milk (and its derivatives such as cheeses, milk-based sweets most of which initially were brought from Spain such as dulce de leche -found everywhere the Spanish went, hence every Latino country has its own dulce de leche-, meat for steaks and such, etc). When it comes to the DR, almost all of those products thst are consumed in the country are from domestic ranches, even in the resorts. Same with chicken, eggs, fruits (especially tropical fruits for obvious reasons), vegetables, rice, beans, plantains in all its forms, bananas, and other foods. That's unlike most of the Caribbean. Resorts did import the steaks mostly from the USA, because American cattle devoted to this experience cold winters and that causes them to produce fat. That influences the flavor and how tender the meat is. Dominican steak is more lean and tougher, because the cattle always are in a warm climate. There is a new cattle breed in ranches up in the central mountain valleys near Jarabacoa where their genetics (forgot what two cattle races were mixed) plus the cooler climate there produces a more tastier and tender steak. However, the Nacional supermarket chain people are behind this development, so that particular steak is only found in their supermarkets as far as I know. Since it is locally made, it's a little cheaper than the imports from the USA. I don't think they sell to resorts and this is probably the only Caribbean cattle production of that type in the Caribbean.
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