Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
2,500,000 members. Thank you!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-25-2023, 07:36 PM
 
975 posts, read 624,542 times
Reputation: 1723

Advertisements

The title is fairly self-explanatory, but I thought this would be kind of fun.

This can apply to your native language and/or any other languages you speak.

I'm an American who has lived in Malaysia for 13 years. I grew up in Eastern Mass, but I don't speak with a Boston accent because my parents were from other states and they hated the local accent. I still use some of the local words (wicked good, dude).

But after years abroad, my accent, and to a certain degree dialect, have evolved to be more international. I use some British and Aussie words from time to time (You wanker!, Bloody hell, no worries), but I also sometimes mix my English with Malay when speaking to Malaysians, especially my wife and daughter (Go mandi, lah! Can lah! Hello sayang.)

I've been told that when I try to speak Malay, I sound Chinese. lol. Maybe it's because my Malay is rather choppy, but I really don't know.

What about you? Why do you have the accent you have?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-25-2023, 09:11 PM
 
954 posts, read 497,660 times
Reputation: 2162
Sometimes I feel like I’m a parrot. I can imitate and pick up anyone’s accent, enunciation and speech pattern very quickly sometimes I don’t even know what my real “accent” is.

I speak Mandarin, Taiwanese dialect (a bit poorly), English, French fluently and knowledgeable in Spanish, Japanese and Cantonese. (the latter very spotty.) I was told I have a slight “French twang” when speaking English and with “American accent” when speaking Mandarin. My teenager daughter went to French school in her formative years and now she almost isn’t aware she pronounces certain words completely with French accent. (Her English word “dinner” is 100% French without the r sound at the end. She’s very soft spoken so French registered better than English to her.)

We love to make a list of the differences between the U.S and British common words, and often playfully switch them back and forth while applying different accents. ( doing accents is our family pastime.) Traîner vs. sneakers, take away vs. take out (food), to let vs. to rent, to get on well vs. to get along well…it’s fun and educational.

I think when you speak more than one language and generally have good ears/auditory memories, sometimes you’d caught yourself sounding like a cabbie from Brooklyn without even realizing. (When I lived in NYC, sometimes my friends and I heard ourselves unknowingly spoke in typical NY/Brooklyn/Soprano accent with words like “coffee” “daughter” “boss”. When you heard them so much on a daily basis they seeped through your conscious and your brain…)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2023, 12:34 AM
 
Location: West Seattle
6,297 posts, read 4,795,984 times
Reputation: 8319
Standard Chicago accent in English, with a few NYC features from my Queens-ite mom, e.g. Mary/marry/merry are all different for me.

I don't think I have a super strong accent in Hungarian --- I've gotten a few sentences into conversations before the other person realized I wasn't native. But one English feature it's hard to shake is the unstressed vowel reduction: instead of fully pronouncing all the vowels in "barátom" ("my friend"), the first "a" can come out more like a schwa.

When I've spoken Arabic with natives, I always get told my accent sounds like prestigious "newscaster Arabic", even when I'm trying to sound like a regular Joe from Jordan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2023, 05:51 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
6,895 posts, read 5,767,311 times
Reputation: 23405
I speak Russian and English, and I'm pretty all right at Spanish. I learned Tejano style Spanish and apparently the one thing that unites speakers of all other Spanish dialects is that Tejano is the worst, lol. So that's fun. I can fake a Castilian accent but it's super exaggerated and silly sounding.

I have a speech impediment that shows up in Russian but not in English - I can't consistently trill my Rs because of mild ankyloglossia. I'm told it sounds "cute" but it annoys me when I'm trying to be serious and someone is trying not to smile and I can guess why

In English I have an upper Midwestern accent with a little Slavic influence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2023, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
30,361 posts, read 17,745,454 times
Reputation: 34017
Good thread. I'm from NYC, but I have been told that I don't have a NYC accent; people have thought I'm from the American South, while I am not so go figure

When I speak Chinese, I try my best to emulate a Beijing accent, but one can of course tell that I'm not a native speaker. That said, I also don't sound like a standard American speaking the language.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2023, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA/London, UK
3,844 posts, read 5,231,006 times
Reputation: 3324
Very cool thread/topic!

I am a native English speaker and split my time growing up between Jamaica, Canada and the US. People say I have a pretty "flat" accent with hints of Jamaican still thrown in. When I am with my Jamaican family or back in JA visiting, my accent comes out much stronger, so I can flip it on and off relatively easily.

I am also fluent in Spanish and speak with a Panamanian accent, since I learned Spanish from birth from my Panamanian born Grandmother. The Panamanian accent is a mix of Central American and Caribbean Spanish for reference.

Finally, I learned how to speak Turkish while living in Istanbul. I've been told that I have an Istanbul accent, which makes sense since that is what I was exposed to while learning. Funny enough though, my best friend in Turkey speaks with a black sea accent/dialect, so a few words come out that way when I am speaking Turkish due to his influence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2023, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Northeast of Brazil
3,887 posts, read 6,669,953 times
Reputation: 2344
I'm a native Portuguese speaker, raised in the state of Ceará, specifically in Fortaleza, the state capital and largest city, and my accent is very typical of this part of Brazil (Fortaleza and most of the state of Ceará). Both the accent and the slangs.

The way we pronounce the letter "S" before consonants "T" and "D" is different of the way we pronounce the letter "S" before all other consonants (and the final S in the word), that's very typical of here and it's a totally subconscious (or maybe unconscious) thing... For example, in the world "disposto" (that means "willing" or "disposed" depending on the context) we here in Ceará pronounce the first "s" (before the letter "p") differently of how we pronounce the second "s" (before the letter "t"). That's peculiar of our accent, and it don't happen in most of Brazil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2023, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Dayton OH
5,628 posts, read 11,152,602 times
Reputation: 13039
I am a native speaker of English from California. I lived most of my school years and working years in California, with 3 years of work in New Jersey and 2 years of work in Alabama. In both of those locations (NJ & AL), the locals knew right away I was not a local, and many correctly figured I was from the "west coast".

I speak Spanish too, which I started learning at Kindergarten age. I can't remember when I did not know how to converse in Spanish. Later at age 17, I attended high school as an exchange student in Chile for one year. I very rarely spoke English for a year, but I also never adopted a "lazy" way of speaking Spanish from Chile, which is dropping the pronunciation of many word endings. My pronunciation is more like Sonora, Mexico. Here in Germany, I know lots of people from Venezuela who I speak Spanish with. Nearly all are very surprised when I say that I am from the USA.

I learned German in the 1970s when I was age 19 to 22 serving in the US Army (stationed in Germany). I forgot a lot after I returned to the USA after my Army years, but since I retired 5 years ago, I have spent at least half that time in Germany. I rarely speak English here, and my German has gotten pretty darn good, but I still have a "foreigner's accent". At least a dozen times, people who don't know me have asked if I am from Holland, so that is my answer, I speak German with an accent that sounds like someone from Holland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2023, 07:38 AM
 
975 posts, read 624,542 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDee12345 View Post
The title is fairly self-explanatory, but I thought this would be kind of fun.

This can apply to your native language and/or any other languages you speak.

I'm an American who has lived in Malaysia for 13 years. I grew up in Eastern Mass, but I don't speak with a Boston accent because my parents were from other states and they hated the local accent. I still use some of the local words (wicked good, dude).

But after years abroad, my accent, and to a certain degree dialect, have evolved to be more international. I use some British and Aussie words from time to time (You wanker!, Bloody hell, no worries), but I also sometimes mix my English with Malay when speaking to Malaysians, especially my wife and daughter (Go mandi, lah! Can lah! Hello sayang.)

I've been told that when I try to speak Malay, I sound Chinese. lol. Maybe it's because my Malay is rather choppy, but I really don't know.

What about you? Why do you have the accent you have?
My daughter is 18 months old now and I wonder what accent she's going to have.

Like I said before, I'm American, my wife is Indian Malaysian and our daughter goes to daycare with mostly Chinese Malaysian toddlers. She already uses the word for milk in Mandarin, speaking mostly English but understands some Malay words. She'll be all over the place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2023, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,703 posts, read 37,519,078 times
Reputation: 11501
I grew up in English-speaking parts of Canada but in a (Canadian) French-speaking family.

Growing up I spoke both languages fluently but my accent in English was probably closer to "the norm" than my French one was. What I mean by that is that I sounded more like your average Anglo-Canadian than your average French Canadian. When I'd go to Quebec, I'd sometimes get asked if I was an anglo (who just had really good French).

Now I've lived most of my adult life in Quebec so my accent in French has more or less merged with the typical Québécois accent of people here in my social class. No one ever asks me if I am an anglo anymore.

Over the years living in Quebec I think I have taken on a bit of a slight French accent when I speak in English. Especially when there are periods when I don't speak English for a while.

The French intonations in my English would similar to what the interviewee here has, though my accent is much less charming than hers.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-NQX6SXhOM

Though if I am speaking English a lot most of the French intonations disappear and I sound a lot like Justin Trudeau in English.

I also speak very basic Spanish and my teachers have always told me that my accent is really really good. So much so that when I speak to people in a Spanish speaking country, they assume I am a lot better than I am and go immediately into rapid-fire Spanish they think I will understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top