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Old 07-04-2012, 01:55 AM
 
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My wife laughed out loud the first time she heard me pronounce "phantom," phanthumb. It's something I've done all my life.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:35 AM
 
27,654 posts, read 21,573,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skwim View Post
My wife laughed out loud the first time she heard me pronounce "phantom," phanthumb. It's something I've done all my life.
That is funny.

I've heard a lot of people pronounce asphalt as ash-phalt. Even an ENGINEER, which astounded me.

And some people say heighth for height.
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Old 07-04-2012, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,339 posts, read 2,929,893 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post

I've heard a lot of people pronounce asphalt as ash-phalt.
Probably Canadians.

That's a Canadian pronunciation which seems uncommon in American English.
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:27 PM
Status: "hibernating" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: New England
7,726 posts, read 5,606,405 times
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I used to say lengthly, as is a lenghly speech. It still sounds right to me.
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Old 07-05-2012, 10:10 AM
 
8,398 posts, read 6,924,216 times
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I've seen the letter "l" missing from the word "public" many times.
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Old 07-05-2012, 11:09 AM
 
27,654 posts, read 21,573,774 times
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^^^ I think that's a Freudian typing slip.

I saw it recently at work in a bank's presentation materials. Pubic Finance.
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Old 07-05-2012, 11:30 AM
 
Location: PA (work in NJ)
6,611 posts, read 8,532,862 times
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Hijacking my own thread here, since this is supposed to be about our own mistakes but....


The Italian place across from where I work has had "broccoli rape" on the menu for years. The "pubic" thing reminded me of this.
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
38,753 posts, read 38,397,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Probably Canadians.

That's a Canadian pronunciation which seems uncommon in American English.
I heard a radio ad in Canada, in which the announcer identified the sponsor as "Kenmount Ashfelt and Masonairy Supply Company". Getting two words wrong in the name of one company. But the company president and everyone who works there pronounces it that way.
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Austin
2,173 posts, read 1,426,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I post a lot in these threads about my impatience with poor grammar, poor vocabulary, or poor usage. But I'm also a pretty tough self-critic. I'm probably harder on myself than I am on the stupid fools who make grammatical errors consistently. So here are my confessions:

I used to mix up "ersatz" and "erstwhile." They have totally different meanings, but I still have to stop and remind myself whether I'm reading about something that doesn't exist anymore or something that's a cheap fake when one of them pops up in something I'm reading.

Up until about a year ago, I thought it was correct to say "I was pouring over all the books I could find on the topic..." but it's actually "poring." I guess I had a mental image of a person "pouring" themselves like a liquid over a whole lot of written material, sort of becoming one with it. But stupid me, it's "pore."

I somehow got through my whole life (42+ years so far) without learning the word "chanteuse." I read a LOT, so how did the word get by me without my looking it up? I'm embarrassed to say I heard someone on TV (who isn't necessarily very bright) say the word--"so-and-so was a very famous chanteuse..." and was like "huh?" Then I looked it up. My boyfriend, who reads about as much as I do and who also has a decent vocabulary, even knew the word (but he also does crossword puzzles a lot). Of course, as things like this always seem to happen, once I learned the word, I now see it a lot.

I had thought that the saying "toe the line" was "tow the line." I didn't know the origin of the phrase, but I knew when a person was told to "tow the line" they were being told to "buckle down," follow the rules, or pay better attention to what they should be doing." So I pictured fishermen towing a fishing line, working more diligently to catch a fish than just sitting there dozing with a fishing rod in their hands. Then I learned that it was actually "toe" and it came from either track & field (put your toe on the starting line before running) or from shooting contests (put your toe on the line when you shoot for the target and don't go beyond it).


Okay grammar/vocab-snobs (like me), what have been your embarrassing blunders? I came forward with my shame, how about you?
I don't make many myself, but I will tell you what irks me to no end! Loose and lose. I have not figured out why these particular words are used inappropriately. Often. By almost everyone. I don't want to read anymore comments like "I am going to loose my mind." And yet...
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Old 07-06-2012, 09:52 AM
 
Location: PA (work in NJ)
6,611 posts, read 8,532,862 times
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I totally agree with you Red, but this thread is supposed to be our confessions about our own errors. We grammar snobs make them too, albeit rarely . But we can be harder on ourselves than we are on the masses.
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