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Old 07-31-2012, 02:46 PM
 
810 posts, read 615,684 times
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Quote:
1) Casper's paper is by far and away the "newspaper of record" in Wyoming.
The Billings Gazette has been my favorite Wyoming newspaper for several years now.

But, seriously, I find local newspapers to be invaluable here even if they only publish once a week. They are my go-to source of information for what events are happening and what issues are current and may be of interest to me.

Quote:
I remember being told that all the schools are equipped to house kids overnight, for days at a time if necessary, when bad weather persists.
I have helped feed more than a few stranded team members when my kids were still in school. The whole town pitched in. And once a team bus with mechanical problems made our winter formal a lot more interesting for the local kids. They just got to join in on the fun with ours.
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Old 07-31-2012, 04:53 PM
 
634 posts, read 844,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branDcalf View Post
I have helped feed more than a few stranded team members when my kids were still in school. The whole town pitched in. And once a team bus with mechanical problems made our winter formal a lot more interesting for the local kids. They just got to join in on the fun with ours.
I used to teach at a small, rural school in north Albany County....and when a horrible blizzard hit and the roads closed during the school day, we spent the night at school, with students. Basketball in the gym, 5-card poker in the library, movies in the English room, hangman in the Math room....we did it all night long
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:26 PM
 
8,011 posts, read 20,627,850 times
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Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
^^^ WOW! I have learned so much and feel like I've made friends! I hope to get back to Wyoming next summer, but it sure would be an adventure to experience it in winter! You guys are amazing adapters / survivors who obviously are very proud of the place you call home. Isn't that rare in this day and age?

I remember being told that all the schools are equipped to house kids overnight, for days at a time if necessary, when bad weather persists. Can I just say that most parents in THIS part of the country would be screaming holy hell if the school buses didn't bring their precious babies home?
You've made a very interesting and insightful conclusion about living in Wyoming ...

The unexceptional exceptionalism of the residents here who have made a conscious decision that this is the place for them.

Despite our perceived differences in how difficult or not as we perceive living here compared to many other climates and so many other factors ....

One thing I think I can observe in my neighbors and the folk I've met throughout the state who are happy to be here is that every one of them wouldn't hesitate for a second to be of whatever service and assistance they could be in any adverse situation that presented.

Typical scenarios:

Livestock out. Doesn't matter whose or how they got out, but the priority is to contact the owner or find out who it is and do everything reasonably possible to get the livestock back to where they need to be or at least safe and sound, corral'ed someplace so that they can be taken care of later. I've seen loose livestock and a bunch of neighbors pitching in to round 'em up. Have had the proverbial knock on the door from the brand inspector "we need help" and you drop everything to assist. On foot, truck, with an ATV, on horseback ... whatever it takes to deal with the situation, everybody pitches in without question, acrimony, finger pointing, accusations ... the common goal is present and dealt with as expeditiously as possible. If there's fences down or damaged, that can be dealt with later ... and we've all showed up with our fencing tools, materials, and time/labor to deal with the situation for folk who don't have the manpower or ability to do so. No questions asked, no payment expected ... you simply deal with the situation as needed. I've seen horses out on the road that I didn't know whose they were; stopped, haltered with a spare halter or rope, and put them in the closest corral that I could find. The owner of that corral wasn't bothered that I'd taken advantage of their resource, but was asking if that was all of the horses that needed to be rounded up and if I needed any help. Nope, got it under control ... any idea whose horses these are? Time to make some phone calls and locate the owner to retrieve them, or call the brand inspector if need be. Found out one time that the horse owner was out of town and wouldn't be back for a few days ... no problem, we'll feed 'em and they've got access to water. Get 'em when you're back, happy travels. I've seen loose sheep on the road ... didn't know where they came from either, rounded them up and put them in my corral close to the county road. Called the brand inspector who was going to show up the next day to check them out. A day later, the boys who'd been notified by the brand inspector came looking for their sheep that had gotten loose from a flock a couple miles away when they were loading them up for summer range; loaded them up and thanked me for the help. No offer to pay and none expected, happy to help out.

Stuck on the road in a storm, or anytime for that matter. Nobody passes another vehicle that appears to be in distress without stopping. Can't say how many times folks passing by have seen me by the side of the road, checking on my place and stopped to ask if I needed any help (or times when I've been pulled over in a spot where I could get mobile phone reception and was taking a call). You simply do the same for anybody else on the roads around here, it's more than common courtesy, it's just how things are done. I've been asked to fire up a tractor to pull somebody out of the barrow pit in the middle of storms ... it's not a question of will I do it, but where is it needed? Is everybody OK? I've had times I picked up the people and got them home, then went back with a member of their group to get the vehicle out. My neighbors do the same thing as needed. I've seen times where a tractor gets stuck, and another neighbor is already there with theirs to assist. I've passed a stranded car where at least 3 or 4 other vehicles had stopped to help, the folk were digging it out by hand and pushing it out by hand ... but no, they already had it all under control and didn't need any more help. Nevertheless, you stop and pitch in, many hands make for lighter work.

EH had a great story about seeing some folks fishing near his place leave their lights on or somehow ran their battery down on a vehicle one day. He saw them trying to start the vehicle to leave and could see the lights dim when they tried to start the vehicle without success. He was already on his way to assist with a jumpstart for those folks. Didn't matter who they were, or whether or not it was a foolish mistake that caused the problem, he was willing and able to assist and did so without question. And that was just one of his stories to be found in the threads here. These aren't unusual, it's just how it's done.

I've had times where the haying was going slowly with equipment breakdowns, and in the middle of their harvest ... others come by and left me equipment that I could use or helped fix mine. One neighbor saw me having problems with my swather and had his boys drop theirs off between fields they were doing; asked that I have it available for them by the next morning. It did a super job in my field and was ready for them in the AM, fuel tank topped off ... I probably used 20 gallons and filled up over double that. So what? they were kind enough to help me out and it was the least I could do for them. Similarly, I had a neighbor whose son was sent overseas (called up Nat'l Guard unit) and the older fellow had no way to bring his bales of hay in off the field. Saw him out in the field trying to pick up small squares with a trailer and his pick-up truck driven by his wife (ailing, with chemo going on then). Knowing his predicament, I just showed up the next day with my 4020 and bale wagon to retrieve his hay and stack it, I knew where their haystack would go. Didn't ask him, didn't tell him, just did it. Took 8 loads off his field and did a reasonable job of stacking. Didn't expect him to pay me for it. Know what was really nice? a couple of the teenage boys from another neighbor saw me stacking the hay and came back that afternoon to cover the stack and secure it. I couldn't have done that. Of course, we all would have helped out if he'd asked, but he didn't need to do that.

We had a neighbor's horse colic today while she is a two-day drive away from here taking care of family. She called us, needed some assistance, the neighbor's kid that was feeding and watering in her absence wasn't able to deal with the situation. We'd have hitched up a trailer and taken the horse to the vet 32 miles away if needed, but we were able to deal with the horse and treat it to where it will be OK. I'm no vet, but we got the horse up and walking around until it pooped a bunch of stuff and the problem was resolved. Best for the horse and no expensive vet bill for the owner.

I'm sure that every one of the Wyoming posters in this thread would have reacted the same way in their communities here in Wyoming. Even the ones who have different opinions than mine about life here, I have no doubt they'd behave this way. It's simply the way of life here, and it's very different than what many people who move here don't understand.

You can almost tell the difference about some who have a hard time with the concept by how they behave when they move in. The ones who understand the sense of community and civility are the ones who show up on your doorstep with a smile, introduce themselves, and have some home-baked goods as opposed to those who think it's incumbent upon the existing neighborhood to go to them and welcome them. We'll get around to them in time to introduce ourselves, but it's a paradigm shift in how you regard yourself and being an asset to your neighbors as the new neighbor. I've been received by some who treated me as if they were royalty and we were paying them homage and their due respects upon deigning to move into the area. At least that's how I've found it to be; the folk who fit in the community seek to fit in and have done so, and the folk that have moved in around here that came expecting the other residents to cater to them have consistently proved themselves to be a**holes. I've written extensively in other threads about how much time and money they've cost me and others in the community with their expectations, demands upon our resources, and flat-out intrusion upon our property, water, and resources. I'll still be of assistance in an emergency for them, but going beyond that level of neighborliness isn't going to happen.

In our case, we made a point of saddling up a couple horses and riding around to visit all our new neighbors when we moved into the neighborhood. We've since made the rounds every year with gift baskets of our fresh vegetables, especially to our elderly neighbors who have limited financial resources. They know who the guilty party is that left the bags of squash and tomatoes and peppers and onions and potatoes on their doorstep .... and they know that we raise that stuff not only for our own consumption, but for sale from our farm. Ya never know, though ... a basket of fresh corn sometime shows up on our doorstep in the dead of night, too ... and I know where those gardens are.

Similarly, I've had more than one time where I knew neighbors were away for awhile and the snow had piled up in their driveways (1/4-1/2 mile or so). Since I had my rig fired up anyway, we just went over and plowed them out so when they got home, they could make it to their house. Y'know ... I've had my driveway plowed a few times in years since and I don't know who did it .... and the drifts in my drive require a sizable field tractor to front loader out.

And so it goes ... I'm certain that every one of the Wyoming resident posters on this thread and others has many more similar stories ... be it school kids stuck due to road closures, or strangers stuck on the road or at a truckstop, or needing help with house or farm or ranch. None of these situations is treated like it's an imposition, it's just neighbors helping neighbors. Be it Cody or any other place around here ... wyolady, jody, EH, bawhaha, brand, or so many others that post here ... you'd be proud to call them your neighbor.

Last edited by sunsprit; 07-31-2012 at 10:39 PM..
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Auburn
1,975 posts, read 1,988,819 times
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had 60 aces ready to bale 5 years ago all on steep hills. Spent my oldest son's 21 birthday watching diver look for his body. Got home that night and the hay was all baled and stacked in a shed.
Have ran my combine with a few neighbors running thiers and putting up anothers grain as he was in the hospital. Saw 4000 round bales picked up and stacked in one day as the rancher's dad was in the hospital all summerand he cut and bale but didn't have time to haul , there was like 6 tractors loading and 3 stacking and probally a dozen trucks and 5th wheels hauling.
then there food, fire wood, snow removed, brandings docking all done for a neighbor in need.
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Old 08-01-2012, 12:43 AM
Status: "MISSING DANNYY" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Savannah GA
7,840 posts, read 5,682,855 times
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I'm in tears -- literally -- from reading all these heartwarming stories. Not because I think what you describe is so unique to Wyoming, but because I know it describes all of America and indeed, mankind. Despite our many differences, our extreme variations in everyday life, our geographical oddities (you deal with snow in the middle of the continent, I deal with the constant threat of tropical weather on the SE coast), we share a common bond and sense of spirit that truly defines what it means to be American. Whether in NYC or Savannah, GA or Cody, WY -- we share a commonality, pride, spirit and love for life and family that is indeed unique on this planet. No matter where I've traveled in this vast country of ours, I have NEVER ever failed to connect with others who quickly became friends for life. Thanks for sharing your love of Wyoming with me; hopefully I can return the favor someday. Y'all come see us in Georgia!
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Old 08-01-2012, 03:21 PM
 
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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Quoting wyoming/depressed on the Sundance thread today:

"Gillette.....for some of us is not good "

"For as many of those that would tell you that Gillette is GREAT. There are some of us that moved here several years ago that just plain dislike Gillette, Wyoming. I don't even live in the town, but live in 40 mile away Pine Haven. Gillette has nothing to offer, other than possibly employment and a few other things.

If I could have known what I know now about this area, I would have NEVER EVER moved here from Missouri.

Please research carefully what you might expect from a very small community."


This is what I see with so many people who do move here without first doing their due diligence about Wyoming. Small towns exist everywhere, including Missouri, so that's not the big difference .... Gillette is one of the most vibrant economic areas of Wyoming today, and wyoming/depressed isn't complimentary about it due to other factors.

It's simply not everybody's cup of tea. That's why I always advise visiting here to find out for yourself what this place is like before getting all invested into a move to Wyoming.
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Old 08-01-2012, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
8,128 posts, read 11,438,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If I could have known what I know now about this area, I would have NEVER EVER moved here from Missouri.

Please research carefully what you might expect from a very small community."


This is what I see with so many people who do move here without first doing their due diligence about Wyoming. ........

It's simply not everybody's cup of tea. That's why I always advise visiting here to find out for yourself what this place is like before getting all invested into a move to Wyoming.
But that's the thing. No matter how much research you do, how many visits you make...you cannot REALLY know what any given area is like until you actually move there--and are living there day to day.
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Old 08-01-2012, 04:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Cathy4017 View Post
But that's the thing. No matter how much research you do, how many visits you make...you cannot REALLY know what any given area is like until you actually move there--and are living there day to day.
Guess we get to disagree about this ...

I've had some pretty incredible unsolicited job offers around the USA in the 1980's-1990's, with a starting base income in the low 6 figures and commissions on top of that with easy quotas to reach, and traveled to visit the places at the company's expense for the trip and a tour guided by the exec's trying to hire me. I wasn't making anywhere near that kind of money out here in the Rocky Mountains when I got those offers; all I had to do was accept the offer and move and I'd have had a huge boost to my career earnings and opportunities.

But when I visited the cities and saw what my income would bring me for housing, access to my main hobbies (sailing, fishing, flying, motorcycle touring, snow skiing, back country camping, and some land to live on for my horses with access to trail riding) ...

I knew that I'd not be happy moving to those places. They included San Francisco, Portland OR, Seattle, Los Angeles, San Diego, New York City, Miami, Tampa, Orlando, St Louis, New Orleans, and Chicago. Chicago was special because I had a (then) girlfriend who was socially connected there and we had special deals offered to her for housing and recreational opportunities ... she'd grown up there and knew the ins and outs of the place and loved it. I visited for a week, got the red carpet treatment from her well connected family and friends, and knew that it wasn't for me; we broke up because she was going to stay there and I wasn't.

I tried one of those jobs for awhile just because the offer was so incredible and I talked myself into believing that my doubts about the place could be overcome with the liberal application of money. It wasn't too far to where I could go salt water fishing and keep my sailboats for racing, so that was a plus. Moved to Glendale, CA ... stayed for a month before I knew that the job and money was wonderful but the place wasn't for me. My gut never acted up so badly as it did there, it affected me physically as well as mentally. Moved back in 6 months with no plans, no place to live, and opened up a shop back here again after finding a place to buy that would work for me.

Similarly, I've extended job offers to people that came well recommended to me for my businesses to come here from those cities that I didn't like to call home. I've paid their way out here, shown them around, given them a car to tour the place to explore as they saw fit, did the whole wining/dining thing, did the tours of the recreational facilities ... tried to show this place in the best light possible that I could. Got turned down cold by every one of them, they'd figured out that this place was just too slow paced, not enough "things to do", no first-run movie screens, no theater/arts community to measure up to what they were leaving, no shopping to match their pastime or expectations, no year-around opportunity to drive their sports cars, no whole foods or their favorite specialty grocery stores, no trader Joe's, no upick berry farms nearby, no clothing stores to match what they were used to (Nordgrens or similar), no big airports with jet aircraft ready to whisk them away to their favorite destinations, no big year around golf courses, no big sports stadiums or arenas for their favorite teams, no bluegrass green lawns all year round, no deciduous trees or dense hardwood forests with undergrowth (ya know, the type of place where you only hunt deer with a shotgun because you can't get rifle shots there), .... in short, these people typically felt like they were moving back to the stone age and it was too big a transformation for them.

They were universally shocked at how much less salary/income level they would earn here, even though it was adequate to buy them comparable housing ... if not better, with room to move and their own private piece of paradise. Many were just absolutely freaked out at the prospect of long cold windy winters; some came out to verify or dispell their fears and were still freaked out when considering that their family members would have to learn to drive in these local conditions.

And those were all people who were pre-qualified who'd mentioned that they wanted to escape the big city pressures, the huge crowds of people, the hours of commuting to reach their recreation destinations for weekends, and so forth. Some were excited about the prospect of getting away from crappy school districts and wanted good public schools or the opportunity to home school which we have here. I didn't extend my job offers and expenses of trying to hire people until I'd vetted the prospects a bit by phone or letters. Understand that the hiring process has it's expenses for the employer which were a burden on my business.

I had one hire that did come out from San Francisco. He lasted until the first cold weather hit with sub freezing temps. Gave me his two week notice then and moved back to what he claimed he hated so much, got hired immediately back in the Sausalito area doing what he'd been doing before ... for less money.

That's what I've been talking about when I post on all these threads about how folk really need to do that self examination about what makes them happy in a place to live and call home. There's simply so much that many people take for granted that is important to them and they don't miss it until it's no longer there on their doorstep ... and much of it just isn't here.

PS: When I hired on for my current independent rep job, I had to undergo interviews by regional managers outside of the one who I'd applied to. Subsequently, I was interviewed by the manager with a rep opening in Tulsa OK. He didn't want to go behind the back of the manager who I was dealing with, but he told me point blank that if ... for any reason it didn't work out ... that he had a standing offer for me to come to Tulsa and he'd make sure that my quota's were adjusted to a point where I'd make a lot more money there than here. Sorry, but I've been to Tulsa a number of times for training on other product lines and stayed a few weeks there in the summers and winters ... just as I have in Dallas. No way for me; and I've looked at what my housing dollar would buy in both towns when I had weekends off there. Wow, they've got some mighty impressive subdivisions out there at really low price points ... but I'm perfectly happy in an old farm house here and my outbuildings at the ranch. Maybe if the offer was in the 7 figures I'd consider it, but I wouldn't be happy there; I know I'd stay for only a few years before retiring back to work here.

OTOH, I know that I could be perfectly happy in Story, Sheridan, Buffalo, Cody, Lander, Thermopolis, Saratoga (give me the hobo pool every day, please!), Laramie, Sundance, Dubois, the Star Valley, Pinedale, Wheatland, and Cheyenne. Esterbrook would even work (almost bought a gorgeous 80 acre parcel there surrounded on three sides by public lands and with it's own water rights to a 40 acre lake adjacent) if I could resolve the access issue for my travels. There's a commonality about them all that appeals to me and I'd move in a heartbeat to any if circumstances made it possible ... but the other half of this ranch has a job in Cheyenne that she likes, we're not moving. And that's just fine with both of us. Put this in the perspective that I have houses in Vail and can move there if I chose to do so ... years ago, that was a dream that I'd move there or to Aspen or Basalt. Now I just visit now and then, work on my property, and leave to come back here. Well past retirement age, I'm working because I enjoy it and the challenges. Wyoming is home.

Last edited by sunsprit; 08-01-2012 at 05:01 PM..
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:28 PM
 
634 posts, read 844,520 times
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I'm actually wondering if wyoming/depressed doesn't like it because he/she lives 40 miles away. 40 miles isn't a hop, skip and a jump, and perhaps Pine Haven is what wyoming/depressed doesn't like. The poster says Gillette doesn't offer much other than employment, when those who live there (and those who don't) know it has plenty to offer.

Like sunsprit says, they should have determined what they were looking for to define happiness. Gillette has plenty to offer, but if it doesn't have what wyoming/depressed needs to be happy, they are out of luck.
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Old 08-01-2012, 07:03 PM
 
8,011 posts, read 20,627,850 times
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wyolady ... that's an interesting perspective, but

"Gillette.....for some of us is not good "

"For as many of those that would tell you that Gillette is GREAT. There are some of us that moved here several years ago that just plain dislike Gillette, Wyoming."

is pretty specific that he/she dislikes Gillette.

From that, I'd be hard pressed to interpret that he/she doesn't like Gillette because of issues with Pine Haven. If Pine Haven was the problem, it would have been appropriate to slam it as the source of their distress. By Wyoming standards of access, 40 miles is pretty close to home for the regional center of economic/medical/shopping activity and Gillette is quite the regional powerhouse that way ... jobs, shopping, medical, recreation, lots of activity to be found there.

But the big issue still stands: "if it doesn't have what wyoming/depressed needs to be happy, they are out of luck." Spot On!
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