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Old 11-10-2011, 12:55 PM
 
338 posts, read 176,062 times
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Clue time: The element is one that features frequently in murder mysteries as the method of murder...
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Old 11-16-2011, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
14,312 posts, read 20,082,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rescue3 View Post
Clue time: The element is one that features frequently in murder mysteries as the method of murder...
Colonel Mustard, in the library with the candlestick!




This was hard to find, but after several searches over the last few days I finally came across it in a description of "Yellowstone", the BBC series.

Silica and Arsenic.

Yellowstone (BBC TV series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
On the open plateau, bison are built to endure the worst of the winter, bulldozing their way through deep snow to reach grass. In the harshest winter for a decade, even they are forced to move, following a thermal river to a geyser field. The grass here is laced with silica and arsenic – if the bison stay too long, it will poison them.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:18 AM
 
338 posts, read 176,062 times
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That is exactly correct, and you win the prize!

I was watching the Nat Geographic channel's special on Yellowstone and learned that. I had to make sure it was on the Internet somewhere before I posted that question - great find.

You're up!
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Old 11-18-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
14,312 posts, read 20,082,323 times
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OK next quesiton: In regard to the impact that the Great Depression had on Wyoming. The Great Depression is generally considered to have been during the 1930's, beginning on Black Tuesday, with the stock market crash on Oct. 29, 1929. In the 1930's only 27 banks closed in Wyoming. In the 1920's one hundred and one banks failed in Wyoming. What was happening in Wyoming in the 1920's that lead to so many bank closures?
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Old 11-23-2011, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
14,312 posts, read 20,082,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
OK next quesiton: In regard to the impact that the Great Depression had on Wyoming. The Great Depression is generally considered to have been during the 1930's, beginning on Black Tuesday, with the stock market crash on Oct. 29, 1929. In the 1930's only 27 banks closed in Wyoming. In the 1920's one hundred and one banks failed in Wyoming. What was happening in Wyoming in the 1920's that lead to so many bank closures?
Hint: The bedrock of the economy was mining and transportation.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
14,312 posts, read 20,082,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
OK next quesiton: In regard to the impact that the Great Depression had on Wyoming. The Great Depression is generally considered to have been during the 1930's, beginning on Black Tuesday, with the stock market crash on Oct. 29, 1929. In the 1930's only 27 banks closed in Wyoming. In the 1920's one hundred and one banks failed in Wyoming. What was happening in Wyoming in the 1920's that lead to so many bank closures?
Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
Hint: The bedrock of the economy was mining and transportation.
There doesn't seem much interest in this question, in retrospect I can see that the answer to this question is probably too complicated for a trivia question. So I will give the answer away. Rescue3 sent me a PM which explains part of it, which I pasted in below.

The short answer is that the markets for coal and agricultural products were depressed.

For decades significant portions of Wyoming depended on the railroad and coal industries for its economic foundation and to a lessor degree, agriculture. In the 1920's the use of mining machinery grew and the need for coal miners decreased. Coupled with the increased use of petroleum and natural gas, the demand for coal also decreased. All adding up to fewer jobs.

The numerous homesteaders who had settled in Wyoming were also finding that it was very difficult to make ends meet with a small ranch in the state. To make a profit, large amounts of grazing land was required. As a result public grazing land was being over grazed. "Overgrazing had reached the point that Senator Taylor from Colorado said, there was not a blade of grass left in Wyoming." Agricultural prices were depressed and it often cost more to make the improvements necessary to "prove up" a homestead then one could make sell its agricultural products.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rescue3
CptnRn:

A fun one - I used to be in banking. However, I don't want to turn this board into a running conversation between me and you. Let's let someone else find the "History of Wyoming" website.

But the answer is:

Banks fail because loan portfolios fail.

Banks serve communities. If the community disappears, the bank fails for lack of a customer base.

Starting with the Homestead Act in 1916, lots of farms popped up. Communities developed around those farms, and banks with them.

Then in 1919, there was a terrible drought that wiped out farmers' crops. They had to borrow to run their farms and that didn't work out very well.

The interstate system was also changing the face of agriculture; boom towns and farm towns dried up as products and commodities traveled to other places. The banks that served those communities dried up, too.

Short answer: Wyoming was in its own depression long before 1929; probably more like 1921.


You can read more about Wyoming during the depression here Wyoming History - Wyoming & The Great Depression

If anyone else would like to offer up a question, have at it. Other wise I will punish Y'all with another one of my own.
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Old 12-27-2011, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Mountain View, WY
22 posts, read 24,278 times
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Default Where can one find a Golden Rainbow in Wyoming?

I really haven't been on here in about a year, but hopefully I will have more time to stay tuned.

I will take a go at the next question. It sadly seems like this forum is creeping to an end...

Where can one find a Golden Rainbow in Wyoming?

(Hint: You can catch one if you're lucky)
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Old 12-27-2011, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Moved to Washington
275 posts, read 321,277 times
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I know that there are Goldens in Wyoming, and I know that there are Rainbows in Wyoming, and I know that there are Browns and Cutthroats or even Tigers, and also a few Cuttbows, but I didn't know that there were any Golden Rainbows in Wyoming..
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Old 12-27-2011, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Mountain View, WY
22 posts, read 24,278 times
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Sure, that's good enough I guess. I thought it would be more tricky with Golden Trout being a subspecies of rainbows, but I guess not for you dad... We should take a hike into the Wind Rivers some time and try our luck at them.
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Old 12-27-2011, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Moved to Washington
275 posts, read 321,277 times
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You havn't been around for awhile Zearxx, welcome back! I had answered this question awhile ago, ElkHunter had asked it....

The record golden trout was caught out of Cook Lake in Sublette county by Charles Reed on August 5th 1948. It was 11.4 lbs, and was 28 inches long. The lake was planted by Finis Mitchell in the 1930's.




So now for the next question.. Keeping on the subject of Rainbows, how many gatherings of the Rainbow Family of Living Light have taken place in Wyoming?
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