Pennsylvania - Ethnic groups



During the colonial period, under the religious tolerance of a Quaker government, Pennsylvania was a haven for dissident sectarians from continental Europe and the British Isles. Some German sectarians, including the Amish, have kept up their traditions to this day. An initially friendly policy toward the Indians waned in the late 18th century under the pressures of population growth and the anxieties of the French and Indian War. The famous Carlisle Indian School (1879–1918) educated many leaders from various tribes throughout the US. In

Pennsylvania Counties, County Seats, and County Areas and Populations
Pennsylvania Counties, County Seats, and County Areas and Populations

Pennsylvania Counties, County Seats, and County Areas and Populations

COUNTY COUNTY SEAT LAND AREA (SQ MI) POPULATION (2002 EST.) COUNTY COUNTY SEAT LAND AREA (SQ MI) POPULATION (2002 EST.)
Adams Gettysburg 521 94,437 Lancaster Lancaster 952 478,561
Allegheny Pittsburgh 727 1,269,904 Lawrence New Castle 363 94,104
Armstrong Kittanning 646 71,673 Lebanon Lebanon 363 121,199
Beaver Beaver 436 179,351 Lehigh Allentown 348 317,533
Bedford Bedford 1,017 49,944 Luzerne Wilkes-Barre 891 314,643
Berks Reading 861 382,108 Lycoming Williamsport 1,237 119,000
Blair Hollidaysburg 527 127,840 McKean Smethport 1,237 44,884
Bradford Towanda 1,152 62,810 Mercer Mercer 672 119,514
Bucks Doylestown 610 610,440 Mifflin Lewistown 413 46,435
Butler Butler 789 178,078 Monroe Stroudsburg 609 148,839
Cambria Ebensburg 691 150,452 Montgomery Norristown 486 766,517
Cameron Emporium 398 5,843 Montour Danville 131 18,214
Carbon Jim Thorpe 384 59,688 Northhampton Easton 376 273,324
Centre Bellefonte 1,106 138,524 Northumberland Sunbury 461 93,371
Chester West Chester 758 450,160 Perry New Bloomfield 557 43,876
Clarion Clarion 607 41,316 Philadelphia Philadelphia 136 1,492,231
Clearfield Clearfield 1,149 83,203 Pike Milford 550 50,095
Clinton Lock Haven 891 37,680 Potter Coudersport 1,081 18,217
Columbia Bloomsburg 486 64,134 Schuylkill Pottsville 782 148,505
Crawford Meadville 1,011 89,856 Snyder Middleburg 329 37,828
Cumberland Carlisle 547 217,743 Somerset Somerset 1,073 79,456
Dauphin Harrisburg 528 252,933 Sullivan Laporte 451 6,482
Delaware Media 184 553,425 Susquehanna Montrose 826 42,082
Elk Ridgeway 830 34,454 Tioga Wellsboro 1,131 41,461
Erie Erie 804 280,370 Union Lewisburg 317 42,006
Fayette Uniontown 794 146,654 Venango Franklin 679 56,810
Forest Tionesta 428 4,888 Warren Warren 885 43,290
Franklin Chambersburg 774 131,598 Washington Washington 858 204,110
Fulton McConnellsburg 438 14,365 Wayne Honesdale 731 48,889
Greene Waynesburg 577 42,520 Westmoreland Greensburg 1,033 368,428
Huntingdon Huntingdon 877 45,707 Wyoming Tunkhannock 399 27,801
Indiana Indiana 829 88,780 York York 906 389,209
Jefferson Brookville 657 45,818     ——— —————–
Juniata Mifflintown 392 22,760   TOTALS 45,150 12,335,091
Lackawanna Scranton 461 210,711        

Pennsylvania itself, however, there were only 18,348 American Indians in 2000, up from 15,000 in 1990.

Modest numbers of black slaves were utilized as domestics, field workers, and iron miners in colonial Pennsylvania. Antislavery sentiment was stirred in the 18th century through the efforts of a Quaker, John Woolman, and other Pennsylvanians. The Gradual Abolition of Slavery Act was passed in 1780, and the important antislavery newspaper The Liberator appeared in Philadelphia in 1831. As of 2000, black Americans numbered 1,224,612 (10% of the total state population), and were concentrated in the large cities. Philadelphia was 43.2% black in 2000, with 655,824 African American residents.

The late 19th and early 20th centuries brought waves of immigrants from Ireland, Wales, various Slavic nations, and the eastern Mediterranean and the Balkans. Many of the new immigrants settled in the east-central anthracite coal-mining region. In 2000, 508,291 Pennsylvania residents, or 4.1% of the total population, were foreign born, up from 3.1% in 1990. Italy, Germany, the United Kingdom, India, the former Soviet Union, Korea, and Poland were the leading countries of origin. In the valleys surrounding Pittsburgh there are still self-contained ethnic enclaves, and there has been increased interest in preserving distinctive ethnic traditions.

Hispanics and Latinos in Pennsylvania numbered 394,088 in 2000 (3.2%), up from 232,000 in 1990. Most were Puerto Ricans, with smaller numbers of Cubans and Central Americans. In 2000, Asians numbered 219,813; the Asian population included 50,650 Chinese (almost double the 1990 total of 25,908), 31,612 Koreans, 57,241 Asian Indians (almost triple the 1990 figure of 19,769), 14,506 Filipinos, and 30,037 Vietnamese, up sharply from 14,126 in 1990. Pacific Islanders numbered 3,417.



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