All posts by Pavel Prikhodko

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning Pavel has worked for many years as a researcher and developer on a wide range of applications (varying from mechanics and manufacturing to social data, finance and advertising), building predictive systems and trying to find stories that data can tell. In his free time, he enjoys being with his family.

A few numbers about voting

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Elections in the United States are a process that can unify the whole country, and are also the driving factor behind American democracy. People who are voters in national elections must be American citizens (native-born or naturalized) and at least 18 years old. There were six national elections between 2004 and 2014: three congressional and three presidential.

In that period, the voting rate of non-Hispanic Whites across presidential elections decreased from 79.2 percent in 2004 to 73.7 percent in 2012. The non-Hispanic White share of the voting population dropped from 80.4 percent in 2006 to 76.3 percent in 2014. Across the last three election cycles in both types of elections, the voting rate of non-Hispanic Whites fell slightly.

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A few numbers about Mormonism

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Mormonism is the religious tradition of the Latter Day Saint movement of Restorationist Christianity. It was founded by Joseph Smith in the 1820s in New York. Mormonism today is the new, non-Protestant faith. After Smith’s death, most Mormons followed Brigham Young on his journey to the territory of Utah, calling themselves The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). The word Mormon comes from the Book of Mormon, one of their religious texts.

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How people get to work

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

People who live in the U.S. use different modes of transport to get to work. According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 86 percent of people used automobiles, 5 percent used public transport and 0.1 percent used taxicabs in 2012. Less than 1 percent of Americans choose bicycles for transport. Some people (0.2 percent) used their motorcycles to get to work. About 3 percent of workers preferred to walk. We can be sure that most Americans prefer go to work using their automobiles. The development of transportation networks like roads, transit lines and others played an important role in the design of the communities.

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