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Old 06-26-2012, 04:02 PM
 
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This has been a question I have been wondering for a while. How do Africans view people of African descent around the world? I wonder how countries that were directly involved in the slave trade (Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) think especially.

I know in Jamaica, the US, France, and Brazil there is a ral affinity with "the Motherland." The general view of Africa is the typical fair: A hellhole. But for American Blacks, it also has a mysticism and real interest. I wonder what the other side is thinking...
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Old 06-26-2012, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
This has been a question I have been wondering for a while. How do Africans view people of African descent around the world? I wonder how countries that were directly involved in the slave trade (Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) think especially.

I know in Jamaica, the US, France, and Brazil there is a ral affinity with "the Motherland." The general view of Africa is the typical fair: A hellhole. But for American Blacks, it also has a mysticism and real interest. I wonder what the other side is thinking...
I haven't gone to check it out, but I've heard from others that the "mysticism and real interest" is definitely not mutual. A few factors come into play - African emigres to America and their striking success in academia (statistically, well ahead of Black NON-emigres) and business, and also the very severe class divides and poverty in some African nations, which greatly exceeds any kind of class divides or poverty you'll see anywhere in the US. A friend of mine who went to Benin said she and her husband could sense some definite resentment, which was of course not vocalized, but could be picked up on nonetheless.

It would be interesting to hear others' take on this however.
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Old 06-27-2012, 11:05 AM
 
Location: America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
This has been a question I have been wondering for a while. How do Africans view people of African descent around the world? I wonder how countries that were directly involved in the slave trade (Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) think especially.

I know in Jamaica, the US, France, and Brazil there is a ral affinity with "the Motherland." The general view of Africa is the typical fair: A hellhole. But for American Blacks, it also has a mysticism and real interest. I wonder what the other side is thinking...
Let me start by saying my family is from Sierra Leone and we also have some extend family from Nigeria.

So your question is actually attempting to shoe horn Africans into one box and this can not be done. It is a impossibility. Just the same way Africans of the diaspora (blacks in America, Jamaica, Latin America, Europe) are not one group in and of themselves. Not only are there differences between countries, but then there are cultural difference between ethnicities, countries and class etc.

So now, with West Africans a lot of the problem here is, many are not even being taught African history no less about the diaspora. In grade schools in many places you are being taught about European history and very little about African history. Many think African history starts with colonialism, which is funny, considering we colonialised Europe long before they ever colonized us. The same goes for slavery. We enslaved whites by the MILLIONS in north and west Africa LONG before they sought to enslave Africans. North Africa up until about 700 was mostly black (Berbers are originally black) but because of slavery importation and mixing the population's look changed, coupled with then influx of Turks and Arabs on top of that. but that is another story. I know some un-knowledgeable person will try to say I am wrong so just to stop all that so we don't get derailed please see:


this video on African genetics


and


this on the Moors <-- the end of this one is interesting with the aristocratic woman talking about how her black African forefather's history was rewritten and wiped away for certain purposes after the Moors left.

In east Africa, like Kenya for example, this isn't the case. they are taught African history pre and post colonization. So what does this have to do with anything? Well, someone who is ignorant about themselves and their own history, will not know how to identify with others, who may share a similar history, because, well they are ignorant of it. They only know what is going on in the present. So you have some Africans who are extremely ignorant, and they view the diaspora in a way, as if they have no connection. Then you have those who are educated about themselves and their history, who do see a affinity. This holds true from east to west and north to south in Africa. I was at a masjid once (I am Muslim) and was listening to a brother from Egypt speak. He was a mulatto. Anyway, he referred to the African Americans as (our brothers in blood). He saw himself as a African (a black one) and acknowledged that African Americans are truly African (whether some want to embrace that reality or not). So it all depends on who in Africa we are talking about and their education level.

Now there is another component. Some people in the diaspora are afro-anglos, as I like to call them. Well there are afro anglos on the continent of Africa as well but thats another story. these are the people who have adopted a European mindset and as such, a African would not have anything in common with them and vice versa. I include in this mix, those blacks living in the west who have adopted a "ghettoized" mindset. Some people think acting ignorant is how to be black and this is ridiculous. In America for example, in the 1960s you didn't see as much of this as you do now. Music glorifies this ridiculous mentality today, but back in the 60s and 70s you had music of love and pride in ones self like your James browns and your Marvin Gayes to name a few. Also you had the likes of Miles Davis, Coltrane etc and these men carried themselves with pride. This is afro-anglo mentality is true in all of the diaspora, even Jamaica. I know of one person who said they didn't understand why Africans want to be Jamaicans so bad. When asked, what they are talking about, the person said "I hear Africans speaking Jamaican Patois all the time" lol. This foolish child doesn't realize that Africans were Africans before Jamaica was a Jamaica, so anything they have there, their forefathers gave them from Africa. All over English speaking Africa people speak Pidgin, which is a mix of English and local languages and it sounds much like the Jamaican dialect. My point is, you have these types who do not know much about Africa, don't seem to care much about Africans and again as such they will not be embraced.

So in short, just like anything else some African embrace the diaspora, some don't and there are many reasons coming from both sides of the fence that explain why. Also, to bring this point home, when someone mentioned how their friends were not treated well in Africa or looked down on. Well, how were they acting when they were there? How would anyone have known what they were unless they made it known? I know one black woman from the states who was living in Egypt. She was called "brown sister" in Arabic by a Arab Egyptian. The person got offended, and the Arab said "why are you so offended, we are all Africans here", to which the girl responded "you can clearly see the native American in me". Again, ignorance and cause for someone to treat you differently because you do not identify with the people on the continent for whatever reason. So its a complex issue, one that could be remedied with dialogue and education on both sides.
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Old 06-28-2012, 04:09 PM
 
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WildStyle is right in that it is not possible to sum up continental African views towards diasporans in one neat box. I am a Ghanaian living in the U.S. I see most diasporans as culturally Western and thoroughly disconnected from anything African other than blood (in varying degrees). Of course that is by no fault of their own. There are very few I can identify with in any substantive way. However I respect the descendants of slaves because I took the time to read up on how they got to be the way they are. Slavery was a horror and I wouldn't be in the U.S. thriving if they didn't persevere.

I have an affinity towards Haitians. When I came to the U.S. they befriended me and we have a lot in common from religion to the way we balance packages on our heads.
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Old 07-02-2012, 11:45 AM
 
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Actually, I specifically was wondering about countries directly involved in the slave trade, like Nigeria, Angola, etc. I made this clear in my first post. I'm well aware that Africa is huge, diverse, and impossible to succinctly summarize. I was more asking for specific views from people and their families.

Other than that little tid bit you got wrong, WildStyle, thank you for your info. I have a Nigerian friend who says she BARELY learned about African history, and I also have a Mozambican friend who is very well versed on African history, especially Southern Africa.

My Kenyan friend thinks it interesting how blacks in the New World kept many obviously African things, such as beats, dances, and mannerisms.
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Old 07-02-2012, 02:44 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
Actually, I specifically was wondering about countries directly involved in the slave trade, like Nigeria, Angola, etc. I made this clear in my first post. I'm well aware that Africa is huge, diverse, and impossible to succinctly summarize. I was more asking for specific views from people and their families.

Other than that little tid bit you got wrong, WildStyle, thank you for your info. I have a Nigerian friend who says she BARELY learned about African history, and I also have a Mozambican friend who is very well versed on African history, especially Southern Africa.

My Kenyan friend thinks it interesting how blacks in the New World kept many obviously African things, such as beats, dances, and mannerisms.
I have a Congolese friend that said something similar. When he came to the U.S. he was very surprised at how many things he recognized in Black American culture that were clearly of African origin. True to form, DNA is a dominant force.
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:25 AM
 
4,626 posts, read 5,263,105 times
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Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
This has been a question I have been wondering for a while. How do Africans view people of African descent around the world? I wonder how countries that were directly involved in the slave trade (Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) think especially.

I know in Jamaica, the US, France, and Brazil there is a ral affinity with "the Motherland." The general view of Africa is the typical fair: A hellhole. But for American Blacks, it also has a mysticism and real interest. I wonder what the other side is thinking...
I'm American but the people I known from Africa have very mix reviews. You really got to look at situation 360 just as Most Black Americans know little of Africans, most Africans know very little of black American culture and History. Again I got mix reviews but first I going to speak on the bizarreness of some negatives. Most Africans I met at least at some point all there thoughts of black Americans were based on recent black American pop culture stereotypes. And I stress pop culture and mainly recent. Most Africans would not know about slavery in America, very little of the jim crow period. Most would not know what black Americans have contribute to America like the blues, jazz, Rock & Roll and etc. Some of black American culture is partly connected with African roots but it's not obvious as say Afro Brazilian.

I understand why some West Africans may be confused by why most black Americans don't want to learn about there roots. It's very hard for black Americans to trace our roots. But basically you have a lot of yoruba, ashante, Mande and etc people in America not knowing there yoruba, ashante, Mande and etc. I feel it's one thing not to know what direct background you are it's other not to know even the options. But with saying that modern west Africa is not black Americans roots are a ancestors may have been Yoruba but they were never Nigerian. I have met some Africans that thought of us as nothing but sell outs and etc. This is largely because of lack of understanding of the top paragraph and again what black Americans have contribute to America.

Last not all of my experiences have all been negative I have met plenty of Africans with positive things to say about black Americans. I have even dated an Liberian girl a while back no comment.
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Old 07-04-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,189 posts, read 2,413,389 times
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Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
I'm American but the people I known from Africa have very mix reviews. You really got to look at situation 360 just as Most Black Americans know little of Africans, most Africans know very little of black American culture and History. Again I got mix reviews but first I going to speak on the bizarreness of some negatives. Most Africans I met at least at some point all there thoughts of black Americans were based on recent black American pop culture stereotypes. And I stress pop culture and mainly recent. Most Africans would not know about slavery in America, very little of the jim crow period. Most would not know what black Americans have contribute to America like the blues, jazz, Rock & Roll and etc. Some of black American culture is partly connected with African roots but it's not obvious as say Afro Brazilian.

I understand why some West Africans may be confused by why most black Americans don't want to learn about there roots. It's very hard for black Americans to trace our roots. But basically you have a lot of yoruba, ashante, Mande and etc people in America not knowing there yoruba, ashante, Mande and etc. I feel it's one thing not to know what direct background you are it's other not to know even the options. But with saying that modern west Africa is not black Americans roots are a ancestors may have been Yoruba but they were never Nigerian. I have met some Africans that thought of us as nothing but sell outs and etc. This is largely because of lack of understanding of the top paragraph and again what black Americans have contribute to America.

Last not all of my experiences have all been negative I have met plenty of Africans with positive things to say about black Americans. I have even dated an Liberian girl a while back no comment.
I met a lot of people from Africa in college. Not one of them ever thought of Black Americans as sell outs. I have never heard any one them even use that term. I think educated black people from Africa and the diaspora understand each others perspectives quite well. Many of the African leaders that led the way to each of their country's independence were inspired by the struggle of American Black people.
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Old 07-04-2012, 09:15 PM
 
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Most Black Americans/Carribeans/Brazilians are descendants of slaves of white taskmasters. Most native Africans are descendants of "slaves" to European colonizers. Both were involved in the struggle to gain political freedom and economic independance. Many within both communities have been left behind under the weight of a non-progressive lower class. Both groups tend to be mainly judged according to their lower class and not the significant strides which they have made overall.
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Old 07-04-2012, 10:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
I met a lot of people from Africa in college. Not one of them ever thought of Black Americans as sell outs. I have never heard any one them even use that term. I think educated black people from Africa and the diaspora understand each others perspectives quite well. Many of the African leaders that led the way to each of their country's independence were inspired by the struggle of American Black people.
This is very abstract because were taking about a broad group of individuals, and people have different experiences. I not saying Africans generally view black Americans that way but don't be surprise if some Black Africans do. It's similar how some black Americans have bad ideals of Africans. Lot of negative stereotyping on both sides is cause by ignorance of the other group.

watch especially pass 6:00 to the end

Coming Home - Ghana - YouTube

Again mix reviews I have met a lot Africans with positive views of Black Americans also. You can't offended by ignorance of some individuals of either group, you got to remember what it is. Whether it's someone African calling a black American ghetto or being called white in some African language, or a black Americans calling Africans names. You got to remember it's all ignorance but yes "educated black people from Africa and the diaspora understand each others perspectives quite well" unfortunately not every one is so educated of the other group. Many of the Africans I have known though out my life in America said at some point they felt disrespected by black Americans. But that's ignorance and still they met plenty of black Americans that had a different view and became friends with them. What I'm saying is the same thing flipped.
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