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Old 11-06-2011, 10:24 AM
 
811 posts, read 1,097,602 times
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Have Bata bunny boots, very warm.


How about a coat, parka that you can move and work in? No feather stuff takes to long to dry been there done that. Note> stay of out the frozen water.

How about Balaclava, hats, gloves, goggles, bibs?

Thanks
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Bethel, Alaska
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Before someone comes in and says how he dressed in the winter with his 30 years of living there...


Winter Wonderland-Dress For Success - YouTube

Classic Alaska :. Army/Navy
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Bethel, Alaska
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WINTER CLOTHING SYSTEM - YouTube


Clothing Essentials (redone) - YouTube
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Deltana, AK
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Yep, bunny boots or something similar (I wear some ginormous Sorels). Carhartt insulated bibs over normal clothes. Fleece sweater plus down jacket over normal clothes. Note that when it's below zero, you sure as hell better not be getting your down jacket wet... Balaclava with a wool cap over it. Gloves are important: get a pair of well fitting liners to wear all the time, then rig up some way to clip big heavy mittens to your shirt sleeves so they can conveniently come on and off. This keeps me good down to -20 or so, and I've never really been out for long periods below that. At that point, glasses get very cold and become a danger to your face. Below -20 you should really breathe through a scarf. To travel safely at -40, one really needs a great deal of practical experience in the cold.

Remember to eat high calorie food, and drink plenty of water. If you're away from heat sources, have some way to quickly start a fire (if you get wet).
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Point Hope Alaska
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Well its pretty well established fact: No one has more experience dressing for the coldest conditions on earth and staying outside 24/7 as the Inupiaq people do.
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 12,764,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildchild_to View Post
Have Bata bunny boots, very warm.


How about a coat, parka that you can move and work in? No feather stuff takes to long to dry been there done that. Note> stay of out the frozen water.

How about Balaclava, hats, gloves, goggles, bibs?

Thanks
Well something people overlook is footwear! You get cold feet your toast!

There is a lot of good boots out there, but having dry feet is almost #1 on that list. You can get "Bunny Boots" which are mostly surplus military boots and they are warm and rubber, your feet sweat and after a day your feet are sloshing around in your boots, when you take them off your feet look like prunes.

The Felt type boots are good too, but if they get wet, you get cold!

First, you need to have spare heavy wool socks, some people like the part synthitic to help wick sweat away, but in my opinion 100% wool insulates even when wet, 50% of something else is that much heat lost when wet.

Befor I put my boots on, I put the Socks on, put the white store shopping plastic bags on over them and the put my boots on. My feet will still sweat and make the socks wet at subzero temps, but I always have dry boots, a change of socks and extra bags with me!

I don't care for the mucklucks, they are comfortable, but you need to be at subzero temps where the snow is very dry and like dust, any warmer and they tend to get wet. There are times in the spring months where it is normal to have -40 at 5AM and be +35 at noon! Big swing and that affects you if you are working outside!

That is for my feet, let others jump in and tell you about other dress.
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:54 AM
 
811 posts, read 1,097,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warptman View Post
Before someone comes in and says how he dressed in the winter with his 30 years of living there...


Winter Wonderland-Dress For Success - YouTube

Classic Alaska :. Army/Navy
Looks like one of the Arctic Oven tents there, Layering is key helps trap the warm air.
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 12,764,625 times
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Snowmachine helmets!

For years I either didn't wear a helmet or when I did it was a battle with the lens fogging/freezing up so if you had a full face one you had to keep the lens up to let the very cold air circulate to keep the lens clear...

About five years ago I bought a full face helmet with a double lens and a 12 volt heated heater built in, talk about going first class! At -40 I don't normally go out to the cabin, but the clouds can clear and the temps can plummet while you are on the trail. My snowmachine has a 12 volt plug on it (have installed them on friend's machines) so it is easy to plug the helmet into power.

What a wonderfull piece of gear to have on! You have your neck covered up to the bottom of the helmet and you can have the shield completely closed and at any sub zero temp your face is warm and the lens is clear!

Note: Downside is you have to remember to unplug the helmet before getting off the machine, after the first few head jolts when the cord goes tight, you pick up on that pretty quickly!

This was a warm day and I had the faceshield unplugged, but on the left side of the face shield you can see where it plugs in. This video was coming back after taking a load of lumber out to the cabin.



Pulling the sled empty - YouTube
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:19 AM
 
811 posts, read 1,097,602 times
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Bunny boots are good, if around the water as I had my share of breaking through the ice. Dump out boots make a small fire if I can warm, dry feet put dry wigwam socks on and off I go. I have worn them with no socks after my 2 pr gotten wet, they sorta rub you the wrong way.
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Old 11-06-2011, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 12,764,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SityData View Post
Well its pretty well established fact: No one has more experience dressing for the coldest conditions on earth and staying outside 24/7 as the Inupiaq people do.

I don't know it that is totally accurate, interior Alaska where the Athabaskins live, it is much colder than the North Slope Arctis is at times, North of the Alaska Range.

They are very good at Arctic weather survival skills and normally don't get credit for it! But there are a lot of cultures that do well in those environments!

But as a rule, the "Eskimo's" are the ones that are credited with cold weather survival, which is a stereotype!
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