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Old 05-05-2010, 08:40 AM
 
Location: downtown Troy, NY
4 posts, read 14,478 times
Reputation: 11

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Troy, NY is an Amazing OLD city and it REMAINS a wonderful place to come to visit, live, tour.
IT IS 2010 in TROY, NY. TAKE A NEW LOOK:
Substantial, handsome buildings that are good for another 100 years.
Many buildings and neighborhoods available for renovation and renaissance.
Compact, accessible living with good bus and train and air transportation.
Rural countryside just 10 minutes from the river bank.
Diverse schools, universities, theatres and museums.
Supporting infrastructure of hospitals, civic organizations, churches.
SOLID ECONOMIC BASE AND EDUCATED CITIZENS
Four season climate with excellent plentiful water.

HISTORY:
Troy, NY is an amazing OLD city and it REMAINS a wonderful place to come to visit, live, tour.

1790 through 1825 Troy was mostly a ferry point crossing the Hudson River, a loading dock for farm and wilderness products from the western Massachusetts and Southern Vermont, the top of the 162 miles of rapids-free, sea-level estuary that ends at Manhattan, NYC.

In 1825 Governor Clinton located at the capital Albany, NY, eight miles south, started the ERIE CANAL that openned Ohio >West to a flood of settlers. Troy flourished as a merchant city. Streams and lakes were organized for waterpower, wood was reduced to charcoal for smelters and Adirondack ore made famous Troy cast iron. Citizens and new immigrants brought their muscles, hopes and skills to the industies of Troy.

From 1865 through 1880 Troy was one of the richests places PER CAPITA in the USA. Heavy industry started moving to Pittsburgh by 1880. Enormous sewing factories started to slow and close by 1925. Vibrant retailing in the downtown was killed by the closing of passenger rail to Troy and the opening of the capital district first shopping mall in Latham in 1962. [all dates are hazy]

In 1964 when I first visited, ALL the industry, factory, and homes were still existing, although some were mostly empty.

By 1980 the City of Troy was looking pretty sad and possibly hopeless--especially by new/plywood construction and half-acre greengrass eyes. Even Trojans' grandchildren sneered at its bricks/alleys/sidewalks and moved to the suburbs. Commuters drove through Troy to pick up drugs, to dump sofas to avoid trash fees at home, and to shudder at the thought of waiting for the bus. TV consolidated opinion as auto crashes, crime and fires pushed out less visually-exciting news.

Everyone complained about one-way streets, parallel parking. Two-lane Hoosick Street had massive traffic jams as NY Thruway, Northway, and local traffic speed from the West and are funnelled down from 12 lanes moving East to Vermont and Massachusetts. Sigh, autos are still a problem...

Since 2000 Troy is reviving and succeeding. Write your CURRENT knowledge of Troy, NY in subsequent comments.

Thanks, Hoping to be here another 30 years!

Last edited by CherryHall; 05-05-2010 at 08:43 AM.. Reason: typo eliminated, phrasing improved
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Old 05-05-2010, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Albany, NY
724 posts, read 579,824 times
Reputation: 277
My semester just ended and my graduation is Saturday. As my music major took up most weekends, I am now free to do as I please whenever I don't have a gig. One of the things I am most looking forward to is the ability to take trips to all the wonderful little cities and downtowns in the area, Troy being one of my favorite! My partner and I both adore taking the bus from Albany to Troy to take in the architectural heritage, history, shops, restaurants and on and on.

Doesn't the city have one of the USA's most complete 19th century downtowns? This was the golden age of American city building. Everything we've done in the 20th century has only served to create endless suburbs and truly ruin our nation and our planet. The more towns like Troy we have, the better off we all will be.
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: downtown Troy, NY
4 posts, read 14,478 times
Reputation: 11
GEOGRAPHY (dates are hazy)
The City of Troy is sited on five miles of the east side of the Hudson River. The Hudson River flows South to North and back South again every 24 hours with the ocean tide.

On its east RIVERBANK is (south to north):
*South Troy =located south of the Postenkill Canal (Mohawk/Hudson Industrial Gateway Museum);
*Pottery District, Washington Park, Little Italy;
*Downtown (Russell Sage College);
*Uptown/North Central (Troy Marina, Troy boat launch);
*Lansingburgh\North Troy (a separate Lansingburgh School District K-12) (Catholic Central High School).

The city was mostly down along the river until horse-drawn trolleys made living on the hills accessible. Living above the river put homes above the smells and soot of 19th Century sewage, horses and coal stoves at the cost of a steep climb at the end of a workday or a slippery snow storm.

ABOVE THE RIVER WARDS and UP steep hills are these areas:
*HVCC Hudson Valley Community College 1946, (LaSalle School), Emerald Greens;
*East Side/Rt 2/Pawling Avenue homes date from 1880 (Emma Willard School 1830 but relocated);
*Mt. Ida date from 1820 (Prospect Park), (RPI Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 1867);
*Hillside =8th>14th Streets, Beman Park =15th Street>Burdett Avenue (Samaritan Hospital/NE Health)(Hilton Garden Inn), 18th>South Lake Ave);
*[north of Hoosick Street] NorthCentral =8th>10th Street, Oakwood/Rt 40 (St Mary's Hospital) (Frear Park) >25th Street >North Lake Avenue;
*ABOVE and east of Lansingburgh is Oakwood Avenue Highlands (Oakwood Cemetery has extensive trails and scenic overlooks) and housing developments of the Diamond Rock area/Troy Waterplant.

YOU can contribute more accurate descriptions and other information when you post the next Reply. Thanks.

Last edited by CherryHall; 05-06-2010 at 05:10 PM..
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Old 05-31-2010, 08:44 PM
 
8 posts, read 28,486 times
Reputation: 12
Default Troy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by CherryHall View Post
Troy, NY is an Amazing OLD city and it REMAINS a wonderful place to come to visit, live, tour.
IT IS 2010 in TROY, NY. TAKE A NEW LOOK:
Substantial, handsome buildings that are good for another 100 years.
Many buildings and neighborhoods available for renovation and renaissance.
Compact, accessible living with good bus and train and air transportation.
Rural countryside just 10 minutes from the river bank.
Diverse schools, universities, theatres and museums.
Supporting infrastructure of hospitals, civic organizations, churches.
SOLID ECONOMIC BASE AND EDUCATED CITIZENS
Four season climate with excellent plentiful water.

HISTORY:
Troy, NY is an amazing OLD city and it REMAINS a wonderful place to come to visit, live, tour.

1790 through 1825 Troy was mostly a ferry point crossing the Hudson River, a loading dock for farm and wilderness products from the western Massachusetts and Southern Vermont, the top of the 162 miles of rapids-free, sea-level estuary that ends at Manhattan, NYC.

In 1825 Governor Clinton located at the capital Albany, NY, eight miles south, started the ERIE CANAL that openned Ohio >West to a flood of settlers. Troy flourished as a merchant city. Streams and lakes were organized for waterpower, wood was reduced to charcoal for smelters and Adirondack ore made famous Troy cast iron. Citizens and new immigrants brought their muscles, hopes and skills to the industies of Troy.

From 1865 through 1880 Troy was one of the richests places PER CAPITA in the USA. Heavy industry started moving to Pittsburgh by 1880. Enormous sewing factories started to slow and close by 1925. Vibrant retailing in the downtown was killed by the closing of passenger rail to Troy and the opening of the capital district first shopping mall in Latham in 1962. [all dates are hazy]

In 1964 when I first visited, ALL the industry, factory, and homes were still existing, although some were mostly empty.

By 1980 the City of Troy was looking pretty sad and possibly hopeless--especially by new/plywood construction and half-acre greengrass eyes. Even Trojans' grandchildren sneered at its bricks/alleys/sidewalks and moved to the suburbs. Commuters drove through Troy to pick up drugs, to dump sofas to avoid trash fees at home, and to shudder at the thought of waiting for the bus. TV consolidated opinion as auto crashes, crime and fires pushed out less visually-exciting news.

Everyone complained about one-way streets, parallel parking. Two-lane Hoosick Street had massive traffic jams as NY Thruway, Northway, and local traffic speed from the West and are funnelled down from 12 lanes moving East to Vermont and Massachusetts. Sigh, autos are still a problem...

Since 2000 Troy is reviving and succeeding. Write your CURRENT knowledge of Troy, NY in subsequent comments.

Thanks, Hoping to be here another 30 years!
I was lucky enough to live in Troy for a whole year, about 8 years ago. Im hoping to repeat the experience and return there for school next year. Admittedly, i was overly optimistic about part-time work opportunities and ended up deeply in debt but im older and wiser now...i absolutely loved being so close to nature. I lived way up on Oakwood Avenue past the cemetery, thus i could be in Frear Park in 5 minutes or Benington VT in about 40 minutes. Troy does have good and bad...if you happen to get off 787 at the wrong exit you could end up in some not so great 'white ghetto' areas. The movie 'The Time Machine' with Aussie actor Guy Pierce was filmed there in 2000, precisely because it has 19th century neighborhoods which have changed very little, if at all. If i had money, id live in East Greenbush, be close to gainful employment in Albany or NYC, bur equally close to Vt, without exhorbitantly high taxes or poverty wages. Troy is somewhere i would definitely return to. i would even go so far as to say i have some affection for the place.
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Old 06-08-2010, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
308 posts, read 1,384,946 times
Reputation: 64
I have deep affection for this place too. It is always my second hometown.
Quote:
Originally Posted by toy-cop1965 View Post
I was lucky enough to live in Troy for a whole year, about 8 years ago. Im hoping to repeat the experience and return there for school next year. Admittedly, i was overly optimistic about part-time work opportunities and ended up deeply in debt but im older and wiser now...i absolutely loved being so close to nature. I lived way up on Oakwood Avenue past the cemetery, thus i could be in Frear Park in 5 minutes or Benington VT in about 40 minutes. Troy does have good and bad...if you happen to get off 787 at the wrong exit you could end up in some not so great 'white ghetto' areas. The movie 'The Time Machine' with Aussie actor Guy Pierce was filmed there in 2000, precisely because it has 19th century neighborhoods which have changed very little, if at all. If i had money, id live in East Greenbush, be close to gainful employment in Albany or NYC, bur equally close to Vt, without exhorbitantly high taxes or poverty wages. Troy is somewhere i would definitely return to. i would even go so far as to say i have some affection for the place.
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Old 06-11-2010, 03:48 PM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,874 posts, read 11,368,705 times
Reputation: 2576
DD will be starting at RPI after a gap year. We visited twice, and are hoping all goes well.
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