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Old 03-03-2017, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Old Town
1,976 posts, read 3,496,600 times
Reputation: 2014

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Why? Because they are tearing up the entire center of the city to save 2% of the population 11 minutes of time.
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Old 03-03-2017, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Abu Al-Qurq
3,690 posts, read 8,050,230 times
Reputation: 2956
Quote:
Originally Posted by NMHacker View Post
Why? Because they are tearing up the entire center of the city to save 2% of the population 11 minutes of time.
Hold up here. That's not quite true. This will save less than 1% of the population any time over the previously existing alternative. The vanishingly small number who save any time will save less than 5 minutes.

This also doesn't factor in the large percentage of the transit-using population who will actually take longer to get to their destination and/or use transit less often. This is based on ART's own estimates, long after all the interminable construction is over and done with.

The fact is a vehicle that has to make so many frequent stops is not really any faster than one of the rapid rides that has to stop at occasional red lights. Existing city bus service on Central, which makes far more frequent stops, is slower, but is substantially more popular, is due to be curtailed to pay for this albatross. Now these riders will have to walk further to the nearest ART stations, slowing their commute. The ART report did a side-by-side comparison and found most of these existing commuters would take a minute or two longer on average to get to their destination.

ART could have been substantially different- putting twin corridors on Coors and San Mateo, or Louisiana, or Montgomery, or Menaul, where there is far lower quality transit than along the best-quality route we have, and plenty of demand, would have actually impacted ridership positively instead of lowering it slightly.

Any benefit that <1% would have received has already been spent in traffic delays from construction.

Instead of just hitting itself in the head with a hammer it already had, the city went out and bought the most expensive hammer it could find for the job.
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Old 03-05-2017, 05:58 PM
 
60 posts, read 56,899 times
Reputation: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoidberg View Post
Hold up here. That's not quite true. This will save less than 1% of the population any time over the previously existing alternative. The vanishingly small number who save any time will save less than 5 minutes.

This also doesn't factor in the large percentage of the transit-using population who will actually take longer to get to their destination and/or use transit less often. This is based on ART's own estimates, long after all the interminable construction is over and done with.

The fact is a vehicle that has to make so many frequent stops is not really any faster than one of the rapid rides that has to stop at occasional red lights. Existing city bus service on Central, which makes far more frequent stops, is slower, but is substantially more popular, is due to be curtailed to pay for this albatross. Now these riders will have to walk further to the nearest ART stations, slowing their commute. The ART report did a side-by-side comparison and found most of these existing commuters would take a minute or two longer on average to get to their destination.

ART could have been substantially different- putting twin corridors on Coors and San Mateo, or Louisiana, or Montgomery, or Menaul, where there is far lower quality transit than along the best-quality route we have, and plenty of demand, would have actually impacted ridership positively instead of lowering it slightly.

Any benefit that <1% would have received has already been spent in traffic delays from construction.

Instead of just hitting itself in the head with a hammer it already had, the city went out and bought the most expensive hammer it could find for the job.
It certainly seemed like that was the case about a month ago, but I was on Central just two days ago and the traffic seems to be flowing a little more smoothly. Is there really any inconvenience to speak of compared to business as usual in super large cities like NYC or LA? (the latter being a prime example because NYC is more walkable.)
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Old 03-06-2017, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
968 posts, read 995,569 times
Reputation: 1516
Quote:
Originally Posted by RioGrandeFeline View Post
It certainly seemed like that was the case about a month ago, but I was on Central just two days ago and the traffic seems to be flowing a little more smoothly. Is there really any inconvenience to speak of compared to business as usual in super large cities like NYC or LA? (the latter being a prime example because NYC is more walkable.)
Central through Nob Hill isn't too bad at the moment. It seems like customers have largely returned to the restaurants and shops, as well: based on what I've seen on weekend nights over the last month or so, most places seem to be back to doing OK. The places that appear to be suffering are either new, or spots that seem like they were having trouble anyway. Even the little record store operated by one of ART's most vociferous detractors seems to be doing good business again, and he seems to have taken down his "No ART" signs.

However, there are a few other parts of town where things are really bad. Central and University is a mess, and has been for months. I don't think I've driven up Central from I-40 since the project began without getting stuck in gridlock for at least 3 or 4 blocks. Construction is heavy down by Presbyterian Hospital as well. As I said in another post, the area around where Central, Rio Grande, and Lomas meet is also a huge, slow-going mess. Things had really been taking off along that West Central corridor; I hope this doesn't stop them in their tracks.
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Old 03-06-2017, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
1,663 posts, read 3,204,292 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Hibs View Post
Central through Nob Hill isn't too bad at the moment. It seems like customers have largely returned to the restaurants and shops, as well: based on what I've seen on weekend nights over the last month or so, most places seem to be back to doing OK. The places that appear to be suffering are either new, or spots that seem like they were having trouble anyway. Even the little record store operated by one of ART's most vociferous detractors seems to be doing good business again, and he seems to have taken down his "No ART" signs.

However, there are a few other parts of town where things are really bad. Central and University is a mess, and has been for months. I don't think I've driven up Central from I-40 since the project began without getting stuck in gridlock for at least 3 or 4 blocks. Construction is heavy down by Presbyterian Hospital as well. As I said in another post, the area around where Central, Rio Grande, and Lomas meet is also a huge, slow-going mess. Things had really been taking off along that West Central corridor; I hope this doesn't stop them in their tracks.
I tried going to 5 Star burgers on west Central not long ago and they were on an hour wait. Granted it was a Friday night.
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Old 03-06-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
968 posts, read 995,569 times
Reputation: 1516
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkymonkey View Post
I tried going to 5 Star burgers on west Central not long ago and they were on an hour wait. Granted it was a Friday night.
That's good to hear, I guess. (They really are terrific burgers).
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Old 03-06-2017, 03:26 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
26,466 posts, read 44,535,470 times
Reputation: 30832
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkymonkey View Post
I tried going to 5 Star burgers on west Central not long ago and they were on an hour wait. Granted it was a Friday night.
I just returned from driving from Broadway Blvd to Louisiana Blvd on Central four times in less than an hour. That included stopping at the Bob's Burgers to eat... The trip started 2:15 pm, I didn't look at the time when we finished the route.

In all fairness, that is not the busiest time. We did not see any traffic backups.

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 03-06-2017 at 03:40 PM..
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Old 03-06-2017, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Silver Hill, Albuquerque
968 posts, read 995,569 times
Reputation: 1516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
I just returned from driving from Broadway Blvd to Louisiana Blvd on Central four times in less than an hour. That included stopping at the Bob's Burgers to eat... The trip started 2:15 pm, I didn't look at the time when we finished the route...
Other than Central and University, most of that stretch is still pretty OK. West of downtown is where things really go to pot at the moment...
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Old 03-06-2017, 05:56 PM
 
6,976 posts, read 4,293,245 times
Reputation: 9218
I realize this might be a stupid question to ask, since the streetcar/light rail idea was killed back in the day, but does anyone think this ART thing could be upgraded/changed to a streetcar/light rail 10 or 15 years from now?
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Old 03-06-2017, 06:42 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
26,466 posts, read 44,535,470 times
Reputation: 30832
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
I realize this might be a stupid question to ask, since the streetcar/light rail idea was killed back in the day, but does anyone think this ART thing could be upgraded/changed to a streetcar/light rail 10 or 15 years from now?
That would not be an upgrade "10 or 15 years from now?"

Between 1904 and 1928 Albuquerque's Central Avenue was served by an electric street railway.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centra...ue,_New_Mexico)

ART does not use rails. It does not use overhead electric wires and electric trolley poles. It is basically an electric bus powered by internal rechargeable batteries. It can be driven on regular streets.

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 03-06-2017 at 07:08 PM..
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