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Old 04-10-2016, 09:40 PM
 
9 posts, read 9,894 times
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With A.R.T. in place, with you know dedicated bus lanes in the middle of major arterials, like Montgomery, Menaul, Indian School, Coors, etc...you know citywide. This means people can get around quickly and safely without driving. This opens the another bus transit system, I call New Mexico Regional Transit. (NMRT) In effect, a bus would leave from (say) Madrid, NM, and arrive in Albuquerque at 5am, 6am, 7am, and 8am. Then leave back to Madrid at 5pm, 6pm, 7pm and 8pm. There would be a sweeper run at noon and midnight, to make sure noone gets stranded. In effect, a driver would drive a bus from Madrid, then drive a car back, then drive another bus. This would provide a lot of part time employment in rural suburbs. For locations longer than 2 hours from Albuquerque, like Silver City, or Roswell, a dual driver system could be implimented, where one driver drives down, the other drives back within 6 hours or so. The buses would park in the day in Albuquerque. To compliment, commuter rail would arrive in from Las Cruces, Gallup, White Sands, Raton, Tucumcari, in the morning, and leave in evening. Innovated idea would be "dinner buses' where you can have dinner at a table. Whatever, A.R.T. is not just a Albuquerque issue, it is a state wide issue. The reason why we do this, is frankly it is cheaper than building more freeways (for that matter traffic accidents cost $$$$). It is a safer way to travel. New Mexico highways are not the best, but with New Mexico Regional Transit, it would reduce traffic,making the roads safer. And this would run on alternative fuel (ie Algae produced biodiesel). With nearly a 1,000 buses, it would employ nearly a 3,000 people or more statewide. I calculate that A.R.T. would need about 1,000 buses, but would employ about 10,000 people. We are talking J.O.B.S. It also means more disposable income, people can spend in restaurants, education, houses (solar collectors). Who loses, well the Texas Oil Billionaires, who can't stand the idea of alternative fuels. TOUGH!
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Old 04-10-2016, 09:50 PM
 
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There are two issues here, first, state highway departments are not obligated to reimbuse businesses for road reconstruction. Businesses do indeed benefit once the road is built. But there is an impact during construction. The reason why state laws do this is called "Act of God". Roads do indeed wear out due to snow,ice and traffic. Everytime a pot hole is repaired, the business cannot sue since it lost a parking place due to pot hole repair. A town cannot sue the highway department if there is a land slide or a snow storm. There are numerous court cases on this. However, sometimes local governments do help, with loans etc. The other issue is the bus lane. This is the reason why traffic engineers design streets, not politicians. The fact is traffic patterns change over time. As Albuquerque's population grows, there is more traffic. Somewhere you have to add high occupancy vehicles like buses. One bus lane can carry as many people as 5 car lanes. So the question is this, will the dedicated bus lane take away business. The answer is squarely, it will stimulate business. It is people who shop in stores...not cars. With more people, there is more pedestrian activity, and where you have pedestrians you have business. I know, I help build the Seattle area transit system, and the bus express system is so popular, it is being loved to death. The fact is, it will stimulate the economy. The merchants cannot demonstrate that the reduction in auto traffic will impact retail business...for one reason, it hasn't been tried. The fact is Route 66, is a Federal highway, and thus Federal funds are being used. So should be heard in Federal court, not local court. There is a long history in other cities on this. There are two issue involved here, and I suspect the courts will separate the two.
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Old 04-10-2016, 10:00 PM
 
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I have been monitoring this in Seattle. Many of the same comments and fears I have heard are the exact, exact, exact same thing that happen in Seattle in 1990, when we built the bus express system. When we presented it to the voters, it passed with nearly 2/3rd approval. The reason why the center lane bus express system was put in, was squarely it can be built faster and quicker than rail system. Today it is very popular. When we started up the Sound Transit system, at first the buses ran empty, but the price of gasoline went up to nearly $3.00 a gallon. The everyone flocked to the system The fact that we had a region wide transit system (with center stations, real stations), for buses, kept the region out of a recession, while the rest of the nation went into a recession. In short, it created jobs, and stimulated business. Back in 1975, I worked with then Jack Kolbert, Mayor of Albuquerque, we designed a city-wide A.R.T. system, with dedicated bus lanes, with pedestrian platforms in the middle. This was citywide on arterials like Menaul, Montgomery, Juan Tabo, Indian School, Coors, etc. Since the Arab oil embargo was going on, we even passed state legislation calling for the use of school buses, for an emergency transit system. What most people do not know, is that the engineers back in the 1950s actually did discuss putting in a transit system based on bus lanes citywide. This was 1950!!!! Very visionary. Albuquerque can put in a bus rapid transit system, citywide, within one to two years, capable of handling 50% of all trips...and make it nice, professional, safe, fast, etc. This is actually low cost as transit systems go. But most important when people spend less on cars,ie gasoline, it means they have disposable income to spend on restaurants, groceries, homes, education, health care. Keep in mind, Central use to have a street car on it, except we are using streetcars with rubber tires. Nob Hill use to be a high class neighborhood, until auto interest ripped out the street car. All we are doing is putting back in what was lost. This is going to be very very good for business.
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Old 04-11-2016, 10:17 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Originally Posted by MartinNix View Post
It is people who shop in stores...not cars.
Yes, people with particular habits.

Nob Hill is not so amazing and central that drivers can't go somewhere else if they find it inconvenient to continue going there.
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Old 04-11-2016, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
5,940 posts, read 8,886,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinNix View Post
The fact is Route 66, is a Federal highway, and thus Federal funds are being used. So should be heard in Federal court, not local court. There is a long history in other cities on this. There are two issue involved here, and I suspect the courts will separate the two.
While Route 66 is a historic route, the Federal Highway Administration does not own any portion of the route; all of the route is owned and maintained either by state or local governments.
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Old 04-11-2016, 11:11 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
This is just a suggestion, but that part of town has enough of a draw that it will attract consumers regardless of the inconvenience of the ART construction.
I'm not convinced Nob Hill is all that. It's pretty small. It's not like a real downtown and it's not even like the area you might find around a university in a large city.

If this all works out I will admit I was wrong, and I may end up shamelessly enjoying the new way of getting around on Central. I don't see it. I know it ruffles feathers to say it, but given the behavior of a lot of public transportation users here, I don't really want to go back to using public transit. Albuquerque has a lot poverty along with the social problems that tend to cluster with it. No new public transportation is going to magically transform that (and therefore make using public transportation more palatable).

I guess on a psychological level, driving my car feels a lot closer to getting around on foot almost all the time (the way I used to in Philadelphia) than riding public transit does.
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Old 04-11-2016, 01:03 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
16,656 posts, read 19,453,483 times
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Originally Posted by ApartmentNomad View Post
I'm not convinced Nob Hill is all that. It's pretty small. It's not like a real downtown and it's not even like the area you might find around a university in a large city.
You are not convinced Nob Hill is all what? It is a neighborhood that attarcts a certain amount of commerce.

Whether ART will increase or decrease the amount of commerce Nob Hill attracts is at question here, not how Nob Hill compares to real downtowns or areas around universities in other cities.
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Old 04-11-2016, 01:18 PM
 
3,688 posts, read 5,352,680 times
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Nobody's saying once ART is built on Central it will magically improve everything. But I think it is a step in the right direction in a city that seems to refuse to think about its transportation future while expanding with huge new developments like Santolina.

Nob Hill has its issues and one of them is lack of parking:

"Carter said she has lived in the area for more than 30 years.

“Sometimes, we as residents want to say, ‘We live here! We’re residents. We need to be here,’” Carter said. “It is just difficult when they don’t seem to care. I can’t park in my driveway sometimes.”

The city said there are no plans for new parking in the area."

Neighbors say Albuquerque’s Nob Hill has a parking problem | KRQE News 13
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Old 04-11-2016, 05:02 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Nob Hill has its issues and one of them is lack of parking
Agreed. I vote for more parking.

Maybe the problem is I've made the adjustment from an extremely dense urban downtown to a spread out, sometimes quasi-suburban city, a little too well.
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Old 04-11-2016, 05:03 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
You are not convinced Nob Hill is all what?
Try a dictionary of idioms.
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