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Old 04-11-2019, 04:22 PM
 
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I'm looking for some good books to read about or set in NM or ABQ, fiction and non-fiction.

So far I've read quite a few of Rudolfo Anaya's books, including of course "Bless Me, Ultima." Also saw the movie.

I've read "The Spell of New Mexico" edited by Tony Hillerman, which I loved despite its published date of 1976. There was still A LOT of relevant insight even though it's dated.

I love this quirky book I found called "Signs and Shrines: Spiritual Journeys Across New Mexico," by Sharon Neiderman.

Now I want to find more like these books - real insight into the culture, thoughtful observations from natives or non-natives. Both have interesting perspectives and focus on different things.

Do you have any favorite authors or books you might recommend that are set in ABQ or NM? If you know any movies, those would be nice to know, too, but I'm especially interested in books. Thanks!
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Old 04-11-2019, 04:45 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
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I was going to say "The Spell of New Mexico Paperback – May 1, 1984" by Tony Hillerman (Author)...

Not specifically about New Mexico, but related and my copy was loaned to quite a few New Mexicans "Great River, The Rio Grande in North American History" by Paul Horgan. It is a bit over 1,000 pages, it was two volumes, my paperback came in one volume. I got it about 15 years ago, probably time to re-read it again...
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:17 PM
 
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Just finished Alburquerque by Rudolfo Anaya, it was pretty good. Also John Nichols trilogy.
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:57 PM
 
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There are several. At the top of the list is Bless Me Última, by Rudolfo Anaya. It grabbed me from the first page to the last.
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Old 04-11-2019, 08:21 PM
 
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Those are all good (although don't know the Niederman book). Rudy Anaya also has edited other collections, like Tierra, and Cuentos: Tales from the Hispanic Southwest.

Of course the classic, Death comes for the Archbishop, by Willa Cather. And The Milagro Beanfield War by John Nichols (also a film).

V.B. Price has two very good books: A City at the End of the World (about Albuquerque), and The Orphaned Land, about environmental contamination in New Mexico.

The House at Otowi Bridge, by Peggy Pond Church, is one of my favorites, about the life of Edith Warner, a single woman from Pennsylvania who settled to work at the train depot near the San Ildefonso Reservation, and her relationships with the Pueblo Indians and the scientists who later came to work on the Manhattan Project.

Also a favorite: The Centuries of Santa Fe, by Paul Horgan, is a fascinating series of portraits of historical people from the founding of Santa Fe to the present, weaving the history of that city and the territory/state through a vivid retelling of their lives.

River of Traps: A New Mexico mountain life, by William DeBuys, tells of the author's attempt at farming in a Hispanic northern NM village.

American Indians of the Southwest, by Bertha P. Dutton, is dated but provides a good foundation for understanding Native history and culture, as well as Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's more recent Indigenous People's History of the United States.

New Mexico: A new guide to the colorful state, by Chilton, Chilton, Arango etc. is a great resource for details on local history for anywhere you go in the state.

Field guides, such as Field guide to the plants and animals of the Middle Rio Grande Bosque (Cartron et al.) are also invaluable.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:32 PM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
Those are all good (although don't know the Niederman book). Rudy Anaya also has edited other collections, like Tierra, and Cuentos: Tales from the Hispanic Southwest.

Of course the classic, Death comes for the Archbishop, by Willa Cather. And The Milagro Beanfield War by John Nichols (also a film).

V.B. Price has two very good books: A City at the End of the World (about Albuquerque), and The Orphaned Land, about environmental contamination in New Mexico.

The House at Otowi Bridge, by Peggy Pond Church, is one of my favorites, about the life of Edith Warner, a single woman from Pennsylvania who settled to work at the train depot near the San Ildefonso Reservation, and her relationships with the Pueblo Indians and the scientists who later came to work on the Manhattan Project.

Also a favorite: The Centuries of Santa Fe, by Paul Horgan, is a fascinating series of portraits of historical people from the founding of Santa Fe to the present, weaving the history of that city and the territory/state through a vivid retelling of their lives.

River of Traps: A New Mexico mountain life, by William DeBuys, tells of the author's attempt at farming in a Hispanic northern NM village.

American Indians of the Southwest, by Bertha P. Dutton, is dated but provides a good foundation for understanding Native history and culture, as well as Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's more recent Indigenous People's History of the United States.

New Mexico: A new guide to the colorful state, by Chilton, Chilton, Arango etc. is a great resource for details on local history for anywhere you go in the state.

Field guides, such as Field guide to the plants and animals of the Middle Rio Grande Bosque (Cartron et al.) are also invaluable.
River of Traps looks particularly intriguing to me. I am going to rent that one out for sure.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:42 PM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
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109 East Palace: Robert Oppenheimer and the Secret City of Los Alamos, Jennet Conant

If you know about or live in Los Alamos I guarantee you will find this book intriguing.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:57 PM
Status: "Trump - excepting Jorgensen, the least of multiple evils" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
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I'm sure there are others, but the only one I can recall at present is The Milagro Beanfield War (and I really did read the book -- need to find the rest of the trilogy). author John Nichols and I seldom find common ground, but burned-out social worker Charlie Bloom's introduction to local cuisine (the grittier side of a chicken dinner) by local Stella Armijo was hilarious!

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 04-11-2019 at 10:14 PM..
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Old 04-11-2019, 10:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
I'm sure there are others, but the only one I can recall at present is The Milagro Beanfield War (and I really did read the book -- need to find the rest of the trilogy). author John Nichols and I seldom find common ground, but burned-out social worker Charlie Bloom's introduction to local cuisine (the grittier side of a chicken dinner) by local Stella Armijo was hilarious!
Hahahahaahaaa! I went on Amazon looking for author Stella Armijo thinking the book you were referring to had "Charlie Bloom" in the title. Joke's on me! I finally figured out the obvious. I'll have to read the Milagro Beanfield War. I've picked it up a number of times, but it's never been the right time.
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Old 04-11-2019, 11:13 PM
 
434 posts, read 342,726 times
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Good God, everyone! I should have asked my question sooner - I'm a kid in a candy store! Really. I've just spent the last half hour at Amazon checking out every title suggested above. Thank YOU!

When I was in ABQ last year, I spent a long time in the Barnes and Noble at the Coors Bypass area going through the whole NM section. That's how I found out about Rudolfo Anaya and The Spell of New Mexico. I tried to find more, but it was the generic stuff and certainly nothing you all have recommended. I so appreciate your responses.

aries63 - You're the Bomb! I'm intrigued with V.B. Price. He's got a lot of work out there, mostly non-fiction, and the one novel I found, "The Oddity," is where I'm going to start - along with "The City at the End of the World." I'm very much drawn to his works, how he sees things, his topics. I went to see if VB was male or female and Wiki says he's son of Vincent Price. Interesting little fact.

Two more questions, please...

1. Some of the books recommended are older and may not be stocked in Barnes and Noble. Are there any good used books stores in ABQ and Santa Fe you especially like...or just know about enough to recommend?

2. Would the Barnes and Noble in the Coronado Mall likely have a better selection of books than the Coors Bypass Barnes and Noble (b/c the store's bigger or caters to a different crowd or...)?

Thank you!
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