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Old 07-11-2019, 05:56 PM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,784 posts, read 26,065,089 times
Reputation: 55954

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Personal experiences are welcome!



Yes. I have Googled this. There seems to be much more agreement on locations that are "Allergy Unfriendly" and lots of disagreement about places that are good for people with allergies.



When I was growing up, I knew people who moved to Arizona because their allergies were so bad. Now, I don't see AZ on the allergy friendly lists as much.



Currently, we live in a valley in Ohio. In general, OH comes up on almost every list as a place to stay away from if you are allergic or asthmatic. As does PA, KY, TN, AR and other inland states.



We moved here almost seven years ago. While we like it, every year our allergies and asthma have gotten increasingly worse. My husband had NO allergies before moving here. Now he is constantly coughing, clearing his throat, dealing with post nasal drip, congestion, and shortness of breath.



I am the same, but worse. I've always dealt with some seasonal allergies, but nothing like this.



It isn't just my respiratory system that is affected, it's my skin. I never had eczema in my life, but now I do. My eyes run and are dry and itchy. My husband is experiencing the same thing.



When I read about good areas to live, they seem to share certain qualities.



1. They are near water. Mostly salt water, but Minneapolis was an exception. The NE, where we are from originally, seems OK. Most of the south seems not good - with the exception of FL.



2. OR they are in mountainous regions - Utah and Colorado come up quite a bit. I find this contradictory because I have heard that high altitudes are not good for asthma.



3. California and Florida come up a lot. But, so does Portland Maine and Washington State.



We have come to the conclusion that long term, Ohio is not a good place for us. We both get worse each year.



We want to start visiting some places where we might find some relief.



Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-11-2019, 06:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,447 posts, read 23,125,767 times
Reputation: 27676
You should check for mold in your home, since both of you are experiencing symptoms.
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Old 07-11-2019, 06:08 PM
 
2,997 posts, read 1,251,279 times
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The West used to be good for allergies/asthma until people moving in brought their native plants with them which changed everything. Plus there are 2 different types of asthma. One is caused by allergies and for that type a colder climate is better if everything dies in the winter.
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:19 PM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,784 posts, read 26,065,089 times
Reputation: 55954
So, where do people go now?
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Old 07-11-2019, 11:03 PM
 
Location: on the wind
12,920 posts, read 6,444,509 times
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What specifically are you allergic to? Its pretty difficult to suggest an area without knowing what you are most sensitive to. Don't bother saying it is "pollen" or "hay fever"...the type of pollen could make all the difference. If you know the specific allergens you can search for a place where those allergens are less likely. If you haven't had any allergy testing done do it. It can show the ones that cause the most trouble. For example, if ragweed drives you crazy you could search for a place where ragweed seldom grows. If your worst is mold, you'd want a very dry climate.

A big part of the problem is that your sensitivities can change over time. When you first moved to OH your immune system hadn't been exposed to potential new local allergens. Now that it has been "educated" and sensitized to them it is overreacting to some of them. Think about poison oak/ivy. Most people are allergic to it which is why most people get the skin reaction to it. Each exposure can make their reaction worse. Its not that the plant is more toxic, its that previously exposed people get a bigger immune system response to it.

Having been through lots of allergies, testing, allergy shot series, and associated asthma as a kid I grew up knowing what my sensitivities were (from minor to major), which helped me avoid them. As for asthma, as already mentioned there are two types. Higher altitudes may be "bad for asthma" simply because some one with chronic asthma deals with airway inflammation and constriction so will have to work harder to get enough oxygen out of that thinner air. Its more of a functional problem, not an allergic one.

Last edited by Parnassia; 07-11-2019 at 11:12 PM..
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Old 07-12-2019, 11:35 AM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,784 posts, read 26,065,089 times
Reputation: 55954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
You should check for mold in your home, since both of you are experiencing symptoms.
We've both thought of that. And we are thinking of having that done. However, it's NOT only in my home, HM, it's outdoors.

It's horrible really, because unlike where you live, we have three or four months at best to enjoy the outdoors. Once I get to be outside, there are days that I have to come inside because my symptoms are so severe. So bad that I can't take a walk or spend time on my deck or screened in porch.

People actually joke that all of the warmer months are called "The Pollination". It covers your vehicles, your walk way and your clothes. It's in the Spring, Fall AND Summer. There really is no respite.

We are not the only ones feeling this, but about half of the residents are unaffected. Everyone else is- - to varying degrees.

I grew up on the coast and I was allergic there, but nothing like this.

I LOVE being outside and doing outdoor things. Having only a fell months when the weather is not oppressively cold, makes it very frustrating.

Actually, right now, I am inside the house, windows and doors tightly closed and the AC on.
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Old 07-12-2019, 11:59 AM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,784 posts, read 26,065,089 times
Reputation: 55954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
What specifically are you allergic to? Its pretty difficult to suggest an area without knowing what you are most sensitive to. Don't bother saying it is "pollen" or "hay fever"...the type of pollen could make all the difference. If you know the specific allergens you can search for a place where those allergens are less likely. If you haven't had any allergy testing done do it. It can show the ones that cause the most trouble. For example, if ragweed drives you crazy you could search for a place where ragweed seldom grows. If your worst is mold, you'd want a very dry climate.

A big part of the problem is that your sensitivities can change over time. When you first moved to OH your immune system hadn't been exposed to potential new local allergens. Now that it has been "educated" and sensitized to them it is overreacting to some of them. Think about poison oak/ivy. Most people are allergic to it which is why most people get the skin reaction to it. Each exposure can make their reaction worse. Its not that the plant is more toxic, its that previously exposed people get a bigger immune system response to it.

Having been through lots of allergies, testing, allergy shot series, and associated asthma as a kid I grew up knowing what my sensitivities were (from minor to major), which helped me avoid them. As for asthma, as already mentioned there are two types. Higher altitudes may be "bad for asthma" simply because some one with chronic asthma deals with airway inflammation and constriction so will have to work harder to get enough oxygen out of that thinner air. Its more of a functional problem, not an allergic one.
No doctors here really try to isolate what you are exactly allergic to - they just treat it. So many people present with these symptoms.

I am allergic to whatever stuff is floating around the air in May through October. And, even in the summer. I once enjoy gardening, now I can't do that. Forget hiking. Walking on paved suburban streets is difficult enough.

I was not very allergic as a child or younger adult. A became a little sensitive in my 40s and developed asthma then. So I have been diagnosed with adult onset asthma.

And yes. You are right. The first couple of Springs through Autumns were not bad. They became progressively worse with each exposure.

I'm not trying to be oppositional at all, and I appreciate your help, but what ever specific thing I am allergic to, is active ALL WARMER MONTHS. From May through October.

Since this is not unique to me, or to my husband, I am pretty sure that moving is the only answer. Finding out the specific allergens might be helpful when we are deciding on a new location. But trust me, EVERYTHING in in this part of Ohio makes me symptomatic.

From what you have written and the testing I have had, it would seem that a higher elevation would not be good for me.

I have constricted airways - AND my Asthma is exacerbated by allergens, so there is both an inflammatory and a functional issue at work. I will ask my doctor when I see him on Monday.
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Old 07-12-2019, 12:00 PM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,784 posts, read 26,065,089 times
Reputation: 55954
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
The West used to be good for allergies/asthma until people moving in brought their native plants with them which changed everything. Plus there are 2 different types of asthma. One is caused by allergies and for that type a colder climate is better if everything dies in the winter.
My allergies and asthma are alive and well all year long.
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Old 07-12-2019, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
2,196 posts, read 945,107 times
Reputation: 4918
Having allergies and asthma is miserable. I used to live in Phoenix and got tested for what I’m allergic to. Dust was the number one thing, and those Phoenix dust storms were awful.

Washington has been a huge improvement. I can walk a good distance without puffing on an inhaler. I sneeze more up here, but it’s a trade off. Wherever you live, you’re likely to have some type of allergies.

Agreed that living somewhere with ocean breezes will help blow away pollen. This could be anywhere from California to Maine. You used to live in a coastal climate and things were much better, so it sounds as though coastal living might be in your future. It’s more expensive by the water, but a lot of people do it. I’ve heard good things about coastal towns in Oregon. You’d have a mild climate for outdoor activities too.
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Old 07-12-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,447 posts, read 23,125,767 times
Reputation: 27676
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
We've both thought of that. And we are thinking of having that done. However, it's NOT only in my home, HM, it's outdoors.

It's horrible really, because unlike where you live, we have three or four months at best to enjoy the outdoors. Once I get to be outside, there are days that I have to come inside because my symptoms are so severe. So bad that I can't take a walk or spend time on my deck or screened in porch.

People actually joke that all of the warmer months are called "The Pollination". It covers your vehicles, your walk way and your clothes. It's in the Spring, Fall AND Summer. There really is no respite.

We are not the only ones feeling this, but about half of the residents are unaffected. Everyone else is- - to varying degrees.

I grew up on the coast and I was allergic there, but nothing like this.

I LOVE being outside and doing outdoor things. Having only a fell months when the weather is not oppressively cold, makes it very frustrating.

Actually, right now, I am inside the house, windows and doors tightly closed and the AC on.
I'm allergic to heat. So I can enjoy the outdoors here from Nov thru March, assuming it's not below 40 because I react to cold too. This time of year I can only go outside after dark, or maybe a couple hours between 5 and 7 in the morning. In the winter, I can exercise in my garage and I can ride my bike. The rest of the year, I can't do anything.

Have you asked your doctor about allergy shots? Or tried using Flonase?

I'll be honest, I'm on so many allergy meds for MCAS that my seasonal allergies aren't an issue anymore. Maybe taking more antihistamines would help you too, at least until you move...you can take zyrtec twice a day, you can ask your doctor about singulair or a daily asthma controller.
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