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Old 06-02-2020, 10:41 AM
 
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I don't know if it's just an abnormally good season for allergies or if it's simply because I'm indoors all the time from the lockdown, but my allergies seem to be very tame compared to other years. Hardly any problems at all, unless I take a long walk outside.

Has anyone seen their allergies almost disappear from being inside all the time due to the lockdown?
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Old 06-02-2020, 10:49 AM
 
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You just moved to a new state. It often takes a while to develop allergies to the plants in a new location.

My nephew has grass/pollen allergies. When his family moved from Lakewood, CA to Edmond, OK, he was fine for the first year, then the allergies came back. Turns out he's wickedly allergic to oak pollen, and their yard is full of big old oak trees. He can't spend any time in the yard in the spring without wearing a mask. His allergies are actually worse in OK than they were in CA, and he has to take a daily medication. He's now looking into grad school in some other state where he can get away from oak pollen.

But to answer your basic question, it stands to reason that if someone stays inside they will be exposed to fewer grass/pollen allergens than if they are outside a lot. If your allergy is to mold or pet dander and there is mold or a cat in your house, staying in won't help at all.
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Old 06-02-2020, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Southern California
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Quick background on me: Diagnosed w/ allergic asthma in 2017 at age 42, otherwise never ever had any kind of respiratory issue in my life.

In these last few yrs, I've had several scary, out-of-the-blue occurrences w/ not being able to breathe as well. Overall, haven't had to use my inhalers much at all. But I'm about to get refills so I'm prepared just in case.

Currently: Last Wed., my breathing got funny & hadn't in a long time...don't know if it's just that time of year or something I ate that never used to affect me but maybe as I age, more food ingredients are starting to affect me. I did eat Ore Ida tater tots & I Googled, "potatoes & asthma" & the frozen/processed potatoes DOES affect asthma. Maybe I ate a little too many the night before.

Perhaps it's the masks we've had to wear the last 2 mos that's starting to affect me. I've probably only worn a mask about 7 times for about 1 - 1.5 hrs in the last 2 mos to go grocery shopping.

My breathing's still a little funny now, so I don't know...maybe I'll have to start using my inhaler(s) again for a while here.
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Old 06-03-2020, 04:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
You just moved to a new state. It often takes a while to develop allergies to the plants in a new location.

My nephew has grass/pollen allergies. When his family moved from Lakewood, CA to Edmond, OK, he was fine for the first year, then the allergies came back. Turns out he's wickedly allergic to oak pollen, and their yard is full of big old oak trees. He can't spend any time in the yard in the spring without wearing a mask. His allergies are actually worse in OK than they were in CA, and he has to take a daily medication. He's now looking into grad school in some other state where he can get away from oak pollen.
Isn't it more likely that allergies are most severe when people move to a new state, and then they get used to it over time?

I guess you're right, and it makes sense, but it does seem counter intuitive.

Also, if I keep moving every year or so, then by your reasoning I can escape allergens entirely.

Last edited by MrJester; 06-03-2020 at 05:12 AM..
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Old 06-03-2020, 09:00 AM
 
10,062 posts, read 6,171,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Isn't it more likely that allergies are most severe when people move to a new state, and then they get used to it over time?

I guess you're right, and it makes sense, but it does seem counter intuitive.

Also, if I keep moving every year or so, then by your reasoning I can escape allergens entirely.
Repeated exposure to allergens sometimes makes allergies worse and sometimes better. It depends on the person and the allergy. Without doubt, though, if you move away from whatever you're allergic to, you're going to feel better at least for a while.

The problem of course is that you may develop allergies to whatever grows in the new area. People who tend to develop allergies...tend to develop allergies, wherever they are. My nephew might find relief from his oak allergy by moving to Colorado, but then become allergic to box elder.
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Old 06-05-2020, 09:50 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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I'm noticing the pollen outdoors more than I used to, but I think it's because I bought a couple of good air purifiers and the air in my house feels great to breathe.

As far as the pandemic and allergies, it's made managing my food allergies much more difficult, and I've had reactions that my rescue meds and nebulizer didn't help enough and I had to have prednisone. It's probably going to get worse because the FDA has decided to allow food manufacturers to make ingredient substitutions without updating their labels.
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Old 06-05-2020, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ and Redwood City, CA
11,007 posts, read 7,183,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
As far as the pandemic and allergies, it's made managing my food allergies much more difficult, and I've had reactions that my rescue meds and nebulizer didn't help enough and I had to have prednisone. It's probably going to get worse because the FDA has decided to allow food manufacturers to make ingredient substitutions without updating their labels.
Yikes. Sorry to hear that.

I don't have food allergies but I just bought a Miele canister vac (HEPA, of course) to deal with the growing dust problem in the house. There's very little carpet, thankfully. But I'm worried about the dust that will be kicked up by the process of vacuuming and what effect that will have on my allergies. What gets sucked into the vac stays in the vac, of course. Miele excels at that.
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Old 06-06-2020, 11:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
I'm noticing the pollen outdoors more than I used to, but I think it's because I bought a couple of good air purifiers and the air in my house feels great to breathe.

As far as the pandemic and allergies, it's made managing my food allergies much more difficult, and I've had reactions that my rescue meds and nebulizer didn't help enough and I had to have prednisone. It's probably going to get worse because the FDA has decided to allow food manufacturers to make ingredient substitutions without updating their labels.


Oh no! I hadn't heard that. That could be lethal for people like you and me. I hardly use any processed foods but there are a few, like condiments, canned tuna and salmon, if those are considered processed. I haven't mastered making my own hot mustard, for example! Maybe I'd better learn. I do draw the line at catching my own fish so I guess it's going to only be fish from the fish market that I'll prepare myself. I do a lot of that anyway. Thanks for sharing that very important information.
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Old 06-06-2020, 10:14 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,447 posts, read 23,125,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by movinon View Post
[/b]

Oh no! I hadn't heard that. That could be lethal for people like you and me. I hardly use any processed foods but there are a few, like condiments, canned tuna and salmon, if those are considered processed. I haven't mastered making my own hot mustard, for example! Maybe I'd better learn. I do draw the line at catching my own fish so I guess it's going to only be fish from the fish market that I'll prepare myself. I do a lot of that anyway. Thanks for sharing that very important information.
Here's the info about what they're allowing. https://www.fda.gov/regulatory-infor...-public-health

I usually stick to foods that have one or two ingredients, but there are a couple days I can't cook each month, after I get my zolair and it kicks my butt, and I buy bread and hagen daaz ice cream for those days

I usually buy HEB's organic mustard or Maille brand because I'm less likely to react to them.
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Old 06-06-2020, 11:58 PM
 
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Thanks so much! Just when I think I have my food situation under control, along comes another twist. Ugh.

I hear you on the no-cooking days. I get like that every time I get my allergy shots - the whole day is "shot", pun intended. I like your bread and hagen daz ice cream menu for those days!

I haven't tried Maille mustard and we don't have HEB in my neck of the woods. I've seen the Maille in the store so I'll have to give it a try. I'm using Hengstenberg's German Mustard (medium hot version) right now and I'm getting along with it just fine. It doesn't have preservatives or binders in it which is always a plus.

Otherwise, I think my allergies to perfumes, scents, and the like are a bit better due primarily to keeping as far away from people as possible and constantly wearing a mask when I'm out and about. The other environmental and food allergies are just as bad as ever which isn't surprising - those issues will never change.
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