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Old 10-13-2015, 11:04 PM
 
2,580 posts, read 2,008,090 times
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I have had 2 massage experience and one at the airport chair massage that was horrible. But i loved the real massage in spa. I would love to get more but the price puts me off & the realization that if i stretch more or lift weight i might not be so stiff.

What is the general consensus? is it worth it? if so how often
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Old 10-14-2015, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Gettysburg, PA
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I don't have any real major problems with pain, but when I was getting a massage about once every 2 or 3 months, I noticed that when I did have some minor back problems it took care of them. Now that I've moved and had to cut back expenses a bit, I noticed that the back problems returned when I hadn't had a massage in a while. I am very grateful to God that I now have a fiancé who is not too bad at giving massages. Whenever I have a knot in my back he is usually around within not too long a period to help with it--and the problem goes away. I most recently noticed that I started having restless leg symptoms, and we discovered this huge knot on the side of my thigh. It seemed like it was aggravating a nerve or something. We got rid of it and no more restless leg problems.

I'm planning to go back to getting massages every once in a while if I can save up enough money (if not, then hopefully my fiancé--who lives out of state right now--can be around enough) because I really do think that they are beneficial, at least if you have some minor issues with muscle knots and stuff. If you got some major back problems or something, then it might not be enough. But it's worth it to me!
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Venus
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I know people think of massage as a luxury but for someone who suffers from chronic back pain, to me massage is necessary. It is VERY important that you find a therapist that you like. I have had different massage therapists and they are not created equal. I once had an airport massage. I was very disappointed with it because you are sitting up and not laying down-which is how you get the full benefit of a massage. I have been to some who I didn't care for at all (one keeps sending me discounts but I didn't like her technique that I never used the discounts). When you get a massage, you can tell the therapist too much pressure, not enough pressure, etc.

I have had one massage therapist who is REALLY good but he is in high demand and it is really hard for me to get to see him. I would only get to see him once every 6 months or so-sometimes longer and by that time, my back is really bad that I feel like Quasimodo. Even though he was inexpensive (only charged me $50 for a house call), after a while, I gave up on him. What good is an inexpensive and GOOD massage therapist if I can't get an appointment with him? I have JUST found another therapist who will make house calls. (I am legally blind so it is hard for me to get anywhere). Yeah, he is a bit more expensive ($75) but he will be more regular. So far, I have had one session with him but I'm scheduled for the second. I can't say if one is better than the other-they are just different-different technique. If I had my druthers, I would have one once a week but finances dictates otherwise. So, for me once a month should be doable. I'm sure once I have massages on a regular bases, my back will feel so much better.



Cat
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Old 10-14-2015, 01:09 PM
 
2,580 posts, read 2,008,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Basiliximab View Post
I most recently noticed that I started having restless leg symptoms, and we discovered this huge knot on the side of my thigh. It seemed like it was aggravating a nerve or something. We got rid of it and no more restless leg problems.

But it's worth it to me!
I often have restless leg, maybe that's what it is.

I am going to try to go once every season.
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Old 10-22-2015, 08:47 AM
 
1,205 posts, read 944,615 times
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Absolutely worth it. I am putting off meds or surgery as long as possible. Regular massage takes care of some ordinary middle age aches and pains and also deals well with one big issue I have. But I dont like pain so it is worth the $$.

All sorts of quality in CMTs. Get a referral from a trusted friend/relative/doctor or search on your own. Find a good one stick with them. Plenty of CMTs are fun but not beneficial. I see massage as medicinal at this point so someone right out of school with an extreme light touch won't help me.

There is also good support that massage is good for your immune system. Various other benefits too. I think ppl should spend money on massages and not so much on things like eating out if budget is a concern. You will benefit more and likely be happier. (Even though restaurants are fun
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Old 10-23-2015, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
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For cheaper but still effective massages, you might consider massage schools. You would be contributing to their education but also it's usually a third of the cost. Massage has many benefits
Massage: Get in touch with its many benefits - Mayo Clinic
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,559 posts, read 4,007,221 times
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Massages relax muscles which in turn increases blood flow movement. Blood nourishes (accelerates healing) and removes accumulated toxins in the parts of the body that hurt.

You can do self-massage, buy thermal massagers, or take daily hot water baths to supplement. Massages are just temporary. Eliminating lifestyle habits that may be exasperating the issues are equally essential, e.g. too much sitting, too much exercising or weight-lifting, insufficient nutritious food (powered food and pills are worthless), etc

Massage should be considered a temporary modality until the body is healed. After that, one should be able to put together a healthy self-maintaining lifestyle. Also, some types of massage are far more effective than others but for each person it is different.
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Old 10-28-2015, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
20,310 posts, read 23,891,606 times
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Bear in mind, just because one is certified to do massage, it doesn't always translate into getting the best massage. I went through massage school, back in the mid-1980's, when there was no state licensing (in some states there still isn't), and when I moved to Phoenix, you couldn't run an ad for massage unless you were licensed, and they required 700 hours, whereas I finished school with just 350+ hours.

It's crazy! In neighboring Scottsdale, you only need 200 hours, and in Mesa, at the time, you needed no hours! Zero! When I finished school in Minneapolis, someone did a study as to the requirements to do massage in the 50+ suburbs of Mpls.-St. Paul and there were all kinds of differences/variances.

And, after doing massage for 7 years, I wasn't about to go back to school, and start all over again!

Massage therapists, can be surprisingly picky, as well, as far as what clients they wish to massage. And their telling you they're too busy to give you a massage (I've done the same) may indicate they simply don't want to see you again, and they hope you get the hidden message to find someone else. Myself, I like seeing new people all the time, and don't court a regular clientele, never have!

I've been doing massage for 25-30 years, and this last Great Recession has ended the careers of many a massage therapist. I couldn't survive doing it without a 2nd job.

Myself, having been to China a few times, to get massage there, to learn how they do it, I became addicted to Chinese massage, as well as Thai massage, which is all done dry, no oils needed. I just love that deep kneading and rhythmic, gentle-to-hard pounding/slapping of the body (muffled by a thick towel), and I've since learned, that the pounding actually snaps the toxins out of the body better than Esalen.
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