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Old 06-09-2013, 04:55 PM
 
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The three countries(Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic) are one in 3 instead of 3 in one. All 3 regions have similar cultures and histories. They have similar migration patterns, music, and cuisine. I think it's fair to say that they are regions of the same country separated by water.
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:04 PM
 
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I think it's fair to say you don't know what you're talking about. You could say the same thing about the English Caribbean.
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:11 PM
 
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I'm confused. What exactly are you saying, because as GeographyFreak pointed out, you can say the same of the English Caribbean. I'm totally not understanding the topic...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
I think it's fair to say you don't know what you're talking about. You could say the same thing about the English Caribbean.
I spat out my juice when I read this. Freaking hilarious! Best response ever lol
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:24 PM
 
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Seriously though, the differences become more apparent when you look at the countries in detail. Since you talk about migration patterns, let's examine immigration as well as emigration. Cuba, and to a lesser extent Puerto Rico, was a magnet for Spanish immigration during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This is in part due to the fact that those islands were as Spanish as Madrid up to 1898. The Dominican Republic on the other hand became independent earlier and also saw a lot of white emigration to Cuba and Puerto Rico in the 1830s. That's why today the Dominican Republic is blacker than the other two countries, even though Cuba and Puerto Rico are probably blacker now than they once were.
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Old 06-09-2013, 05:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
I think it's fair to say you don't know what you're talking about. You could say the same thing about the English Caribbean.
I agree. This is why I say British West Indians are monolithic.
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Old 06-09-2013, 07:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
I agree. This is why I say British West Indians are monolithic.

it's not.
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Old 06-09-2013, 07:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Average Fruit View Post
it's not.

Yes, it is.
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
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Those three places have much more in common among themselves (and with Venezuela too, the Venezuelans even speak like typical natives of the Spanish Caribbean; I guess Venezuela is to the Spanish Caribbean as Guyana is the British West Indies) than they do with the rest of Latin America. Panama is another country that has the feel of the Spanish Caribbean as does the Caribbean coastal region of Colombia.

Everywhere else in Latin America it feels very different from these places.
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by knowledgeiskey View Post
Yes, it is.
Only to ignorant people. Are you really going to tell me that Trinidad is exactly the same cultural as Grenada?
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Old 06-09-2013, 08:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Average Fruit View Post
Only to ignorant people. Are you really going to tell me that Trinidad is exactly the same cultural as Grenada?

For the most part, yeah.


Might Sparrow who was a Grenadian born is Trinidad's most iconic artist.
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