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View Poll Results: Which cuisine do you prefer?
Anglo Caribbean 27 40.91%
French Caribbean 16 24.24%
Spanish Caribbean 23 34.85%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-22-2015, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
469 posts, read 576,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mordovar View Post
You have never been in Spain.

Been there. Been to France and Mexico too. I'm also panning trips to Canada and Cuba in the not so distant future, and if all goes as planned a trip to the UK for a couple of weeks. Would you like me to post pictures of the food I see there when I go, all knowing one?
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:15 AM
 
40 posts, read 51,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Habitualmente in English | Spanish to English Translation

Habit | Define Habit at Dictionary.com


Tomato was introduced in Italy less than 500 years ago. What's Italian cuisine without tomatoes

Yucca was introduced in Sub-Saharan Africa by the Europeans, whom themselves discovered it in the Western Hemisphere, less than 400 years ago. Many people are so unaware of this that they actually think certain foods that derives from yucca were actually introduced in this hemisphere by Africans when in reality they have been eaten on this side of the Atlantic for centuries before the first European even arrived on American shores.

I hope you understand what I'm saying.


Yes, but tomato is more recent....tomato was grown, but it was thought to be poisonous until the 19th century!!!
Potato was grown in Europe for its flowers, and only eaten in Malaga, Spain (manzanas de malaga), for centuries after it was brought from America. It became famous during a famine.
Chocolate became known because nuns prepared delicacies (aromas de Guajaca), that order of nuns broght chocolate to Spain...but it became known elsewhere 200 years later.
Most of the famous dishes in the Spanish cuisine are very recent, take for example the fabada, no written mention of fabada until 1930...a dish also influenced by America, as American beans were introduced in the "Pote Asturiano", related to sancocho.
Paella, the flagship of Spanish dishes, was eathen only in Valencia, and it was "arroz valenciano", they still call it like that in the Phyllipines.
The famous Catalan "bread and tomato" became famous after the civil war, as people used to smear tomato over hard bread.
Most of the food eaten now does not bear much resemblance to what we ate 100 years ago, that food would kill us, lard was used, no knowledge of nutrients, cholesterol.
Food in Spanish greater antilles is related to old Spanish food, Canarian food, and food eaten in ships.
Africans did not bring anything with them, that's absurd.
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
30,635 posts, read 18,222,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
So now you are going to tell me what I have or don't have in common with Africans. Sorry I have been to Africa and know loads of Africans, especially Nigerians. I also know Cuban blacks. I live in NYC so I am familiar with what Puerto Ricans and Dominicans eat. I know that a fried plantain that I get in a Dominican restaurant is 100% the SAME as the fried plantain that I grew up eating in Guyana, and is 100% the same as the fried plantains that I have eaten in the homes of Nigerians.

Contrary to what some might peddle the foods of the Caribbean embrace the cultures of the peoples who arrived in the Caribbean. That includes AFRICA.

Will we soon to told that the Afro Cuban rhythms originated in the Canaries? That might be next at this rate.
I try to chalk it up to genuine confusion regarding the subject, but the length that some of these comments (i.e. African slaves lost any culinary method/technique, didn't bring over foods, etc.) make me think something else is at play (what, I don't know), especially in light of the historical and contemporary record and acceptance of African influence in various cuisines today by chefs and historians alike.

Last edited by prospectheightsresident; 05-22-2015 at 11:23 AM..
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:46 AM
 
15,063 posts, read 6,173,585 times
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LOL@ Africans didn't bring anything with them. That's the most hilarious and outrageous thing I've heard in awhile.
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Old 05-22-2015, 11:22 AM
 
1,039 posts, read 1,101,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
LOL@ Africans didn't bring anything with them. That's the most hilarious and outrageous thing I've heard in awhile.
In his defense, which I am reluctant to do since I think he could be that racist Cuban troll that lives in Spain, he may have been talking about Africans not bringing any physical food products etc...he couldn't be that stupid to think African's didn't bring cooking techniques...could he?

Now that I think about it, it is known that some food was brought from Africa along with the slaves so he is wrong regardless
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Old 05-22-2015, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
30,635 posts, read 18,222,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whogoesthere View Post
In his defense, which I am reluctant to do since I think he could be that racist Cuban troll that lives in Spain, he may have been talking about Africans not bringing any physical food products etc...he couldn't be that stupid to think African's didn't bring cooking techniques...could he?

Now that I think about it, it is known that some food was brought from Africa along with the slaves so he is wrong regardless
Pretty much. I tried to give the benefit of the doubt to many of these comments, but they are just categorically wrong when you look at the record.
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Old 05-22-2015, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Seoul
11,554 posts, read 9,325,947 times
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Difficult choice. I'd say Anglo caribbean is the best just because Jamaican cuisine is insane. For a country of its size its amazing how diverse the cuisine is. Of course DR and Cuban cuisine is amazing too. Honeslty I think Caribbean is the tastiest region in the world
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Old 05-22-2015, 10:56 PM
 
8,572 posts, read 8,538,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
I try to chalk it up to genuine confusion regarding the subject, but the length that some of these comments (i.e. African slaves lost any culinary method/technique, didn't bring over foods, etc.) make me think something else is at play (what, I don't know), especially in light of the historical and contemporary record and acceptance of African influence in various cuisines today by chefs and historians alike.

This is just an extension of the usual argument which projects Latin America as based on Spain and a touch of the Indigenous with the African being unimportant. Its important for Latin America to be painted to be as "white" as possible. That way we will ignore the fact that the darkest Afro descendant citizens are almost invisible among the upper middle and upper classes. That is aside from those who make it through sports, entertainment, or the military.
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Old 05-22-2015, 11:19 PM
 
8,572 posts, read 8,538,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
I try to chalk it up to genuine confusion regarding the subject, but the length that some of these comments (i.e. African slaves lost any culinary method/technique, didn't bring over foods, etc.) make me think something else is at play (what, I don't know), especially in light of the historical and contemporary record and acceptance of African influence in various cuisines today by chefs and historians alike.

In fact one can look at corn. It originated in the Americas, and was brought over to Europe, from where it spread to Africa. African slaves brought a variety of corn based dishes with them when they arrived in the Americas.

Mofongo sounds like an African name, but we will soon be told that it was invented by a gourmet chef in Barcelona.
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Old 05-23-2015, 03:45 AM
 
40 posts, read 51,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
I try to chalk it up to genuine confusion regarding the subject, but the length that some of these comments (i.e. African slaves lost any culinary method/technique, didn't bring over foods, etc.) make me think something else is at play (what, I don't know), especially in light of the historical and contemporary record and acceptance of African influence in various cuisines today by chefs and historians alike.

Slaves brought and preserved a large part of their legacy in the Spanish Antilles and Haiti; language, religion and of course music. That was not the case of English sugar factories, they were stripped of all their culture and now the only thing that they have to proof their remote ancestry is colour. Their local historians are always searching for African signs of identity, but most move to laughter since everything is rather English.

Slaves, when they were brought at considerable price, and bought at considerable price in the Spanish colonies, were treated as "conscripts". Just to make my point, during the WWII, when the US Army recruited thousands of Italian Americans, they did not bring their spaghetty and pizza to the army, they had to eat army food, canteens.

They were confined to slave barracks and fed according to norms and standards stablished by the crown. The administrator, usually Spanish, criollo or isleño, was in charge of buying all the food (records remain). They bought considerable amounts of "tasajo" or salted meat, cod fish, meat...and they were allowed to buy cows tat died of old or from disease. For carbohidrate, they used imported rice, Caribbean roots, such as yucca and malanga, and different foods that Spanish and Portuguese brought from their travels, such as sugar cane from India, plaintains from Canary Islands (conquered 50 years before).

After generations, slaves adopted "canteens" and later, when some were freed or the marooned living in "Palenques", they adopted the Taino "conuco", a very small orchard with local vegetables and roots, and pigs, since there were many wild pigs. Anybody interested can read "Memories of a marooned slave" by Miguel Barnet. The book talks about the live of a marooned "esclavo de nación" (from Africa) that fled and later joined independency wars. He died during the 60's.

Of course, as tourist promoters want to promote the food in the Spanish Antilles, they use a lot of poetry since tourists are not culinary historians, but most is false. A very important influence in Cuban cuisine is Chinese, Catonese, since they set up restaurants and eating joints a long time ago, so Catonese food was important even during the past century.

Cuba also imported Indians from mainland, from Yucatan and Guajira peninsula, the Mexican influence is barely detectable in the eastern areas. Indians from India were also imported during the 17th century, but there's no trace of their food. Jews left their imprint as well as Americans, since the island was ocupied from 1898 tp 1912.

With the emergence of a rationing card in 1962, still surviving, most of the culinary culture was lost...Cuba became something similar to a slave barrack that had to eat what was planned by the "Ministerio", a very strange paralelism. As slave masters, communists bought the cheapest foodstuff in the international market...hard chickpeans and broken rice from vietnam, strange cans from the USSR, etc. So the country is now trying to recover their cuisine checking old cooking books.

The USSR underwent a similar phenomenum, as they lost all their cuisine and when communism ended and there was the possibility of opening private restaurants, all the great cooks from the past were dead. They had to start all over from books.

Last edited by mordovar; 05-23-2015 at 03:59 AM..
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