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View Poll Results: Which cuisine do you prefer?
Anglo Caribbean 27 40.91%
French Caribbean 16 24.24%
Spanish Caribbean 23 34.85%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-12-2015, 04:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
I recently decided to cut out cheese/milk etc I sure miss macaroni pie. Callaloo is heaven!

You can go weeks and not eat rice and peas.
Oh boy...well you can still make a vegan version. Love calalloo. I'm vegetarian so it's a great one for me.

Right re the rice & peas...well peas and rice.
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Old 05-12-2015, 04:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wvtraveler View Post
You are correct in that I have more experience with the Spanish Caribbean cuisine. I did have a lot of Haitian classmates when I was in tech school and they would often times bring their lunch with them and it was almost always rice with some form of legume, occasionally some type of meat, usually chicken. That's been my experience with the French side.

I picked Anglo as my favorite of the three because I like the curries they use and the food overall is more flavorful to me...still a lot of rice and beans though.

That's why...the Spanish Caribbean and Haitian cuisine has more rice and beans in standard meals. Mexicans have more of the rice and beans combo incorporated in meals than the Anglo Caribbean generally speaking.

We definitely eat it but our food varies from that a lot more. There are plenty dishes without the rice & beans combo.

Last edited by ReineDeCoeur; 05-12-2015 at 04:42 PM..
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Old 05-12-2015, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
10,068 posts, read 14,940,669 times
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Dominican cuisine is mostly Spanish dishes with a few African/Taino/French (both direct from France and via Haiti)/English (mostly via Lesser Antilles)/Arab (mostly Lebanese) influences. But for the most part its Spanish stuff.

Seafood is hardly part of the local fare (the country doesn't even have a fishing industry despite that the surrounding sea is full of sea life) unlike in the English Caribbean islands and possibly the French. The exception is in Samana where they do have plenty of seafood dishes, but most of the Dominicans over there are descendants of US blacks that moved there in the 1820's. Its the least Dominicanized (aka very little Spanish influence) part of the DR and for practically a century people there spoke English rather than Spanish, and even today most are Methodist/Baptist instead of Roman Catholic. Even the demographic characteristic is different with the white and mulatto element reduced to a very small minority while the pure and nearly pure black in an overwhelmingly majority. In most places in DR the mulatto presence dominates. Samana simply doesn't have much Spanish ancestry whether in full or mixed and this is evident in the local culture and in the food.

Most Dominicans are completely unaware what comes from where. Case in point, most Dominicans think that quipes is legitimate Dominican food, when in reality its Lebanese. Many Dominicans think that sancocho is the most uniquely Dominican stew when in reality its Spanish and in most Spanish American country sancocho is also part of their cuisines. The list is long, but there is very very very few things in Dominican cuisine that is authentically Dominican.

Last edited by AntonioR; 05-12-2015 at 08:10 PM..
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Dominican cuisine is mostly Spanish dishes with a few African/Taino/French (both direct from France and via Haiti)/English (mostly via Lesser Antilles)/Arab (mostly Lebanese) influences. But for the most part its Spanish stuff.

Seafood is hardly part of the local fare (the country doesn't even have a fishing industry despite that the surrounding sea is full of sea life) unlike in the English Caribbean islands and possibly the French. The exception is in Samana where they do have plenty of seafood dishes, but most of the Dominicans over there are descendants of US blacks that moved there in the 1820's. Its the least Dominicanized (aka very little Spanish influence) part of the DR and for practically a century people there spoke English rather than Spanish, and even today most are Methodist/Baptist instead of Roman Catholic. Even the demographic characteristic is different with the white and mulatto element reduced to a very small minority while the pure and nearly pure black in an overwhelmingly majority. In most places in DR the mulatto presence dominates. Samana simply doesn't have much Spanish ancestry whether in full or mixed and this is evident in the local culture and in the food.

Most Dominicans are completely unaware what comes from where. Case in point, most Dominicans think that quipes is legitimate Dominican food, when in reality its Lebanese. Many Dominicans think that sancocho is the most uniquely Dominican stew when in reality its Spanish and in most Spanish American country sancocho is also part of their cuisines. The list is long, but there is very very very few things in Dominican cuisine that is authentically Dominican.
I learned something new! I now feel that I have a solid reason to visit the DR.
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:56 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Oh boy...well you can still make a vegan version. Love calalloo. I'm vegetarian so it's a great one for me.

Right re the rice & peas...well peas and rice.
Hmm I suppose but I make the best Macaroni Pie/cheese ever! *Drooling*

And its Rice & Peas!
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:10 AM
 
15,063 posts, read 6,169,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
Hmm I suppose but I make the best Macaroni Pie/cheese ever! *Drooling*

And its Rice & Peas!
I bet! But tell me you don't call it mac and cheese. It's macaroni PIE!

But yes, will be making some this weekend...with PEAS and rice.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:27 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
I bet! But tell me you don't call it mac and cheese. It's macaroni PIE!

But yes, will be making some this weekend...with PEAS and rice.
I call it Macaroni Cheese normally but sometimes I'll call it Macaroni Pie.

I might do some RICE & PEAS on Sunday with some callaloo
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Old 05-15-2015, 10:45 AM
 
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It's impossible to categorise the different cuisines in the Caribbean as "Anglo" or "French" or "Spanish", since there's so much overlap between language groups and so much variety within them. Curries, pelau, dahl, and roti that are common in Trini, Grenadian and Guyanese cooking are completely absent in the Bahamas, but you'll find some of these same foods in Guadeloupe for example. It's really hard to generalise

Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Dominican cuisine is mostly Spanish dishes with a few African/Taino/French (both direct from France and via Haiti)/English (mostly via Lesser Antilles)/Arab (mostly Lebanese) influences. But for the most part its Spanish stuff.

Seafood is hardly part of the local fare (the country doesn't even have a fishing industry despite that the surrounding sea is full of sea life) unlike in the English Caribbean islands and possibly the French. The exception is in Samana where they do have plenty of seafood dishes, but most of the Dominicans over there are descendants of US blacks that moved there in the 1820's. Its the least Dominicanized (aka very little Spanish influence) part of the DR and for practically a century people there spoke English rather than Spanish, and even today most are Methodist/Baptist instead of Roman Catholic. Even the demographic characteristic is different with the white and mulatto element reduced to a very small minority while the pure and nearly pure black in an overwhelmingly majority. In most places in DR the mulatto presence dominates. Samana simply doesn't have much Spanish ancestry whether in full or mixed and this is evident in the local culture and in the food.

Most Dominicans are completely unaware what comes from where. Case in point, most Dominicans think that quipes is legitimate Dominican food, when in reality its Lebanese. Many Dominicans think that sancocho is the most uniquely Dominican stew when in reality its Spanish and in most Spanish American country sancocho is also part of their cuisines. The list is long, but there is very very very few things in Dominican cuisine that is authentically Dominican.
LOL what on earth are you talking about. I'd say Dominican cuisine is probably 40-40-20 African, Spanish and Taino with a handful of influences from elsewhere (like quipe or yanikeke). The only way you could say Dominican food is spanish is if you've never been to Spain, the cooking techniques are vastly different, and the ingredients are rather different as well. Dominican food overall resembles Haitian food more than it resembles Spanish food to be honest.
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:47 PM
 
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Ingredients are not important, as settlers replaced them with local ones. Both Dominican and Cuban foods are basically Spanish, but using local ingredients. The main dish, Ajiaco in Cuba and Sancocho in Dominica, is Spanish, very old stew, but using local ingredients.

In the case of Cuba, it has been said many times that it's a very archaic northern Spanish food in a tropical climate...not adequate, also Andalusian influence, fritters, not healthy.

Many other Spanish dishes were also transposed, paellas in Cuba, fabadas, caldo gallego, tortilla española, empanadas, etc.

Food in greater antilles has also a nautical origin, beans, dried meats and dishes that have disappeared in Spain. Home food in Canary Islands is similar to Cuban food, not the food served in restaurants, and you can find black beans and rice in some Spanish regions.

Desserts are also very Spanish, but using local ingredients.

Not to forget Chinese influence, that comes after the Spanish one. Taino influence is quite limited to casabe and a few dishes more.
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Old 05-15-2015, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Ingredients are not important, as settlers replaced them with local ones. Both Dominican and Cuban foods are basically Spanish, but using local ingredients. The main dish, Ajiaco in Cuba and Sancocho in Dominica, is Spanish, very old stew, but using local ingredients.

In the case of Cuba, it has been said many times that it's a very archaic northern Spanish food in a tropical climate...not adequate, also Andalusian influence, fritters, not healthy.

Many other Spanish dishes were also transposed, paellas in Cuba, fabadas, caldo gallego, tortilla española, empanadas, etc.

Food in greater antilles has also a nautical origin, beans, dried meats and dishes that have disappeared in Spain. Home food in Canary Islands is similar to Cuban food, not the food served in restaurants, and you can find black beans and rice in some Spanish regions.

Desserts are also very Spanish, but using local ingredients.

Not to forget Chinese influence, that comes after the Spanish one. Taino influence is quite limited to casabe and a few dishes more.
What you say is pretty much on the mark for both Cuban and Dominican food (even Puerto Rico fits in too.) Some Spanish dishes have had slight changes in their names. A perfect example would be the rice dish that Dominicans call "Moro", the actual name of the dish is "Moros y Cristianos" (Christians and Moors.)

As for the sweets, Dominicans think that Dulce de Leche (Milk Sweet is the literal translation, but I don't know if that's the actual translation) or Mata Gallego (Kill a Galician, LOL), to name only a couple, are legitimate Dominican invented sweets. In reality they are Spanish and present in all the Spanish American countries.

Other foods such as Dumplin or Yaniqueques (Johnny Cakes) are of English Caribbean or African American origin, but again Dominicans tend to think they are legitimate Dominican inventions.

Dominicans also eat a lot of Casabe, which is the traditional bread of the Taino indians. I think its an acquired taste, because to many people that didn't grew up eating that it tastes like cardboard. LOL

The exception is with the Chinese influence which is found in Cuban food but not so much in Dominican food. This might change in the next few decades, because Cuba has had a relatively strong Chinese presence since more than a century ago. The Cuban Chinese community has decreased a lot since Fidel Castro rose to power, but their influence in the food remains. In the DR the Chinese presence has been growing since the 1990's and its already the largest Chinese community in the Caribbean. A few more decades and I think many of their foods and preparation styles mighr find their way into mainstream Dominican cooking.

Last edited by AntonioR; 05-15-2015 at 06:45 PM..
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