Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Which cuisine do you prefer?
Anglo Caribbean 27 40.91%
French Caribbean 16 24.24%
Spanish Caribbean 23 34.85%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-15-2015, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,369,707 times
Reputation: 39038

Advertisements

I feel fortunate to have grown up in a community with enough Jamaicans that my High School offered beef patties and coco bread daily for lunch for only a dollar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-16-2015, 04:27 AM
 
692 posts, read 957,946 times
Reputation: 941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Ingredients are not important, as settlers replaced them with local ones. Both Dominican and Cuban foods are basically Spanish, but using local ingredients. The main dish, Ajiaco in Cuba and Sancocho in Dominica, is Spanish, very old stew, but using local ingredients.

In the case of Cuba, it has been said many times that it's a very archaic northern Spanish food in a tropical climate...not adequate, also Andalusian influence, fritters, not healthy.

Many other Spanish dishes were also transposed, paellas in Cuba, fabadas, caldo gallego, tortilla española, empanadas, etc.

Food in greater antilles has also a nautical origin, beans, dried meats and dishes that have disappeared in Spain. Home food in Canary Islands is similar to Cuban food, not the food served in restaurants, and you can find black beans and rice in some Spanish regions.

Desserts are also very Spanish, but using local ingredients.

Not to forget Chinese influence, that comes after the Spanish one. Taino influence is quite limited to casabe and a few dishes more.
How could you say that ingredients aren't important? The logic behind this makes no sense.

Furthermore, even if you look beyond ingredients to fundamental cooking techniques, there is a STRONG African and indigenous influence in Spanish Caribbean cuisine. Ingredients like Beans, Yuca, Yautia etc are all indigenous foods, not Spanish. Platanos, Guineos, the overwhelming presence of fritura, mangu, etc are all African. Even the use of Rice is moreso African than Spanish, since Spanish cuisine doesn't actually use that much rice traditionally.

This isn't to downplay the obvious Spanish influence in cuisine, but to say that it's predominantly Spanish is silly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 07:10 AM
 
98 posts, read 112,181 times
Reputation: 46
Not true. Fritters are typically Andalusian, frituras. Spanish cuisine uses a lot of rice, and the "national" dish is rice. The fundamental cooking techniques are Spanish, stew, fry, bake, stir-fry, basic sofrito.. pork...

The only local Taino and Arawak technique copied by colonizers and pirates was "buncan" (bucaneers).

Plaintains were brought by Europeans, beans were brought from Mexico, rice from Spain.

The African influence is just a myth, as slaves did not cook and probably lost all memory of their food in no time. Slaves were fed with "rancho", the same food used for forced labours and galeotes in Spain. The "olla podrida", the stew with all avaible food items on hand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 07:58 AM
 
692 posts, read 957,946 times
Reputation: 941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Not true. Fritters are typically Andalusian, frituras. Spanish cuisine uses a lot of rice, and the "national" dish is rice. The fundamental cooking techniques are Spanish, stew, fry, bake, stir-fry, basic sofrito.. pork...

The only local Taino and Arawak technique copied by colonizers and pirates was "buncan" (bucaneers).

Plaintains were brought by Europeans, beans were brought from Mexico, rice from Spain.

The African influence is just a myth, as slaves did not cook and probably lost all memory of their food in no time. Slaves were fed with "rancho", the same food used for forced labours and galeotes in Spain. The "olla podrida", the stew with all avaible food items on hand.
More nonsense.

If African influence is just a myth then why don't Blacks in other Caribbean countries cook British or French cuisine? Why does rice play such a prominent role in Caribbean food across the board if it's originally "Spanish"? Why is there such a massive Rice industry in the Carolinas? The only commonality these regions have is the large scale settlement of these areas by African slaves. Rice plays a FAR greater role in Latin American cuisine than in Spanish or Portuguese cuisine, and was brought to the Iberian Peninsula via interactions with Arabs and Africans.

Andaluz frituras aren't made with any of the same ingredients as the kind you see in the Caribbean. Plantains are African (hence why they're practically absent in Spain). As for the fundamental cooking techniques...those are essentially universal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
30,641 posts, read 18,249,084 times
Reputation: 34520
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Not true. Fritters are typically Andalusian, frituras. Spanish cuisine uses a lot of rice, and the "national" dish is rice. The fundamental cooking techniques are Spanish, stew, fry, bake, stir-fry, basic sofrito.. pork...

The only local Taino and Arawak technique copied by colonizers and pirates was "buncan" (bucaneers).

Plaintains were brought by Europeans, beans were brought from Mexico, rice from Spain.

The African influence is just a myth, as slaves did not cook and probably lost all memory of their food in no time. Slaves were fed with "rancho", the same food used for forced labours and galeotes in Spain. The "olla podrida", the stew with all avaible food items on hand.
You clearly need a history lesson
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 08:15 AM
 
Location: London, UK
9,962 posts, read 12,387,502 times
Reputation: 3473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Not true. Fritters are typically Andalusian, frituras. Spanish cuisine uses a lot of rice, and the "national" dish is rice. The fundamental cooking techniques are Spanish, stew, fry, bake, stir-fry, basic sofrito.. pork...

The only local Taino and Arawak technique copied by colonizers and pirates was "buncan" (bucaneers).

Plaintains were brought by Europeans, beans were brought from Mexico, rice from Spain.

The African influence is just a myth, as slaves did not cook and probably lost all memory of their food in no time. Slaves were fed with "rancho", the same food used for forced labours and galeotes in Spain. The "olla podrida", the stew with all avaible food items on hand.
The African influence isn't a myth please shut up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 11:21 AM
 
98 posts, read 112,181 times
Reputation: 46
Why? A myth. Slaves were fed, they did not cook until much later, when they were allowed to cultivate land and raise animals in small scale. In fact, much of the culinary history the larger Caribbean islands are those "ranchos", that was not prepared by slaves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 11:30 AM
 
98 posts, read 112,181 times
Reputation: 46
I don't see any relationship whatsoever between rice and slaves. Rice was brought from Spain, Valencia. Of course, food in the Spanish Caribbean is not exactly the same. If food changes in Spain every 40 kilometers, with 8.000 kilometers much more.

Rice is extremely important in Spanish cuisine, from Paella to Arroz con pollo, also Cuban dishes. There are restaurants solely devoted to rice. Rice is popular in Spain since medieval times, it was brought by Arabs.

The food, even the same dishes, are different because different ingredients, but it's the same dish.

Take for instance a famous spanish dessert: quince paste with cheese became guava paste with cheese.

The most famous Cuban dish: Moros y Cristianos, eaten in several areas of Spain

etc, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 11:37 AM
 
Location: London, UK
9,962 posts, read 12,387,502 times
Reputation: 3473
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Why? A myth. Slaves were fed, they did not cook until much later, when they were allowed to cultivate land and raise animals in small scale. In fact, much of the culinary history the larger Caribbean islands are those "ranchos", that was not prepared by slaves.
Maybe its different on the Spanish Islands but the French and English Islands slaves were not fed, They were given ''cheap'' cuts of meat, salted meats and vegetables would be anything they could grow.. which was a lot.

Many food dishes are different incarnations of West African dishes like Co-co which is cornmeal paste basically similar to Pounded Yam and its eaten in the same manor. With stews...

The use of root vegetables like Tania and techniques of ''Stewing'' meat in Caramelised sugar is thought to be West African in origin.

About the Spanish Caribbean, fried Plantains and Rice and Beans doesn't sound very Spanish to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2015, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
469 posts, read 577,378 times
Reputation: 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post

About the Spanish Caribbean, fried Plantains and Rice and Beans doesn't sound very Spanish to me.
When I was in Spain I didn't see that at all. While rice is eaten in Spain (especially in Andalusia and the east coast), it is nowhere near as common as in the islands from my experience. A lot of other very common Cuban, PR, DR foods were absent as well. I honestly didn't find the cuisine there to be all that similar to Latin Caribbean. Maybe some of the cooking methods, but not the ingredients/spices/etc..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top