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View Poll Results: Which cuisine do you prefer?
Anglo Caribbean 27 40.91%
French Caribbean 16 24.24%
Spanish Caribbean 23 34.85%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-17-2015, 12:50 PM
 
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Not really, the ingredients might be absent as those don't exist in Spain, but cooking methods are the same. Local ingredients replaced Spanish ones, but the food is practically the same. Some did disappear from most of Spain and are only present in some very definite areas, etc.

Rice is present above all in Valencia, but you can find it everywhere.
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Old 05-17-2015, 12:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by P London View Post
Maybe its different on the Spanish Islands but the French and English Islands slaves were not fed, They were given ''cheap'' cuts of meat, salted meats and vegetables would be anything they could grow.. which was a lot.

Many food dishes are different incarnations of West African dishes like Co-co which is cornmeal paste basically similar to Pounded Yam and its eaten in the same manor. With stews...

The use of root vegetables like Tania and techniques of ''Stewing'' meat in Caramelised sugar is thought to be West African in origin.

About the Spanish Caribbean, fried Plantains and Rice and Beans doesn't sound very Spanish to me.

They were also fed with "gruel". Those African "origins" came from the romantic period, really.
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Old 05-17-2015, 01:01 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Rice has been a staple food for hundreds of years throughout parts of Africa and Asia not just Spain. Latin American cuisine especially Latin Caribbean (which is the most ''African'' part of Latin America) is influenced by Spanish, African, neighbouring islands and possibly indigenous Pre-Columbian cuisine.

The African influence on the Spanish islands may be lesser than the English / French speaking islands due to demographics but remember the Spanish Caribbean has a lot of African influences when it comes to Music so its not a stretch to think the cuisine is, too

Quote:
Traditional Cuban food is, as most cultural aspects of this country, a syncretism of Spanish, African and Caribbean cuisines, with a small but noteworthy Chinese influence. The most popular foods are black beans, rice, and meat.
Cuban cuisine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-17-2015, 04:59 PM
 
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My favorite food is from my parents country of Haiti. I know I sound bias even though I'm not trying to.

I grew up eating Haitian Food from my parents house, but always ordered Jamaican, Trini, and Guyanese food when I went outdoors. Simply because Haitians were discriminated against when I was young, and the kids made it seem like Jamaican, Trini, and Guyanese were the coolest nations to be from and had the top cuisine (I'm older now and realize that those kids were just being cocky and bias).

But as I grew and got wise this being at the age of 18, I stepped into a Haitian restaurant for the first time, and omg the food blew my mind away.

But overall Jamaicans and Haitian is my favorite with Haitian being my number 1.

Usually when I introduce my non Haitian friends to Haitian cuisine, they are usually very pleased. In one of my college courses I actually brought in a plate of fried eggplants(Accra), and at first I hid it in the corner since I was shy of judgment, but my Columbian teacher found it anyway, and she paused and demanded to know who had brought it. I raised my hand and told her that's Haitian Food. Later on I end up giving her the recipe.
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Old 05-17-2015, 05:05 PM
 
117 posts, read 137,243 times
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Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
That's why...the Spanish Caribbean and Haitian cuisine has more rice and beans in standard meals. Mexicans have more of the rice and beans combo incorporated in meals than the Anglo Caribbean generally speaking.

We definitely eat it but our food varies from that a lot more. There are plenty dishes without the rice & beans combo.

Haitian food actually varies a lot just as much as anglo. Its just that we have extra options of rice. rice peas, Black rice, and white rice etc.

Rice is something that's used a lot in a Haitian household, but if you go to a Haitian Restaurant you will see the true variety of all types of food in Haiti.

The thing with rice, legume and the one meat is that its usually easier to cook. You are better off going to a Haitian household on Sunday.
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Old 05-18-2015, 12:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Why? A myth. Slaves were fed, they did not cook until much later, when they were allowed to cultivate land and raise animals in small scale. In fact, much of the culinary history the larger Caribbean islands are those "ranchos", that was not prepared by slaves.

So who cooked the food for the slaves. The planters' wives?

In fact cooks in the southern parts of the USA (yes that old racist place) acknowledge African influences in the cooking, as the cooks were mainly black, and inherited certain cooking traditions from their mothers.

So why would the Spanish speaking Caribbean be different when it comes to the culinary traditions of its slave populations?

The lengths that some people go to negate African traditions in the Caribbean is hilarious. There is so much cultural over lap between the various linguistic societies in the Caribbean, and yet the only obvious connection are their common ties to the African slave trade, and the plantation system.
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Old 05-18-2015, 02:22 AM
 
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Caribbean food as a whole is very tasty

what are the major distinctions between french speaking islands, english speaking islands and spanish speaking islands regarding food?
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Old 05-18-2015, 04:46 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Good question Irene there's a lot of overlap between the various ''cultural blocks'' of the Caribbean.

The meals seem similar; Rice, beans, Plantains, Stewed Meats, Barbequed meats and Salads. But the meals ay be spiced differently, called different names or use slightly different vegetable.

In the Anglo islands the main foodstuff that separates those islands from the rest may be the Indian influence. Like Curries in Jamaica, Grenada, Trinidad and the general use of Curry powder or masala. But in Martinique and Guadeloupe I hear they also have that Indian influence.



Also there's a soup called ''Bouyon'' which is cooked on the French islands but also on the English speaking islands like Dominica and St Lucia. But this soup is related to Sancocho which is cooked on the Spanish islands.

^^ That soup is Salted meat and pigeon peas with root vegetables which is similar to English-Caribbean soups. Possibly exactly the same



^^ From Jamaica

There's a lot of overlap some islands may have foodstuffs that are unique like ''Doubles'' roti in Trinidad or Cou-Cou and flying fish in Barbados..
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Old 05-18-2015, 05:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by caribny View Post
So who cooked the food for the slaves. The planters' wives?

In fact cooks in the southern parts of the USA (yes that old racist place) acknowledge African influences in the cooking, as the cooks were mainly black, and inherited certain cooking traditions from their mothers.

So why would the Spanish speaking Caribbean be different when it comes to the culinary traditions of its slave populations?

The lengths that some people go to negate African traditions in the Caribbean is hilarious. There is so much cultural over lap between the various linguistic societies in the Caribbean, and yet the only obvious connection are their common ties to the African slave trade, and the plantation system.

Tourist boards invent the most quixotic things, believe me, and Americans are oversensitive!!
Southern food, including soul food, is intrinsically European..using local ingredients.
The cooks feeding slaves were professional cooks brought from Spain, they were experts at cooking "ranchos". The cook was not a nobody, since food was all important.
There were many rules concerning the food served to slaves, the schedule used in Cuba was almost similar to English islands.
Nobody is negating African traditions, but African cilinary traditions!!!
There are many "experts" that cite old "African" dishes, or attribute African origin to dishes that are not, most of those supposedly African dishes do not exist today, and most people haven't heard their name.

Last edited by Papus; 05-18-2015 at 06:15 AM..
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Old 05-18-2015, 05:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Papus View Post
Not really, the ingredients might be absent as those don't exist in Spain, but cooking methods are the same. Local ingredients replaced Spanish ones, but the food is practically the same. Some did disappear from most of Spain and are only present in some very definite areas, etc.

Rice is present above all in Valencia, but you can find it everywhere.
If that's the case, how do you explain the obvious similarities in Dominican and Haitian cuisine?
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