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Old 04-20-2010, 04:52 PM
 
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I think that Kash's list was somewhat reflective of what people buy fairly regularly. But I agree that Anchorage prices aren't prohibitive. I just don't want anyone to get the idea that they are representative of prices in grocery stores throughout the state.

Sports and even subsistence. hunting and fishing activities can cost quite a bit of money as well.
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Old 04-20-2010, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach
3,381 posts, read 9,082,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigre79 View Post
Sorry, but I just didn't notice a difference when I was at the Fred Myer's in Anchorage. I was looking at prices for that reason, and real staples like milk, bread, and eggs were exactly the same price as here, and some things were cheaper! I'm sure some things are more expensive as well. I didn't look at processed or convenience foods because I don't generally buy those things. Maybe if you're from a very inexpensive place and you have a ton of kids the difference is enough to break the bank, but for single people, couples, or small families, I doubt it's going to be a real hardship there in town. If it is, you can always stop buying meat and fish from the store (there's a lot more opportunity to get it yourself there than there is here), and stop buying sodas and junk food, which cost way more than they're worth anywhere.

Yes, bread, milk and eggs are pretty much the same prices. Meat and Produce is not. You will notice produce is significantly more expensive than anything else. I do not buy sodas or many convenience frozen foods. These are items I was able to find in both ads. If you look closely you will notice household goods are significantly more as well.

I have a decent sized family of 5. My kids are getting older and eating more and more each day. I spend over $800/mo on groceries which just seems crazy. We eat healthy as I am watching my cholesterol and the kids eat school lunches (yuck) which does not count as part of my grocery bill. Breakfast consists of milk and cereal.

In Austin we were able to fill our cart up for $150 or less. Oh how I miss those days. Now I am lucky to leave with a full cart under $250. Again, that was 4 years ago.

Couple misconceptions in regards to fishing to subsidize your food. It is generally cheaper to buy fish than it is to catch it, especially if you live in Anchorage. I don;t mind since its a recreational activity that I love. Best way to keep the cost down, know somebody with a boat and all the gear. Always offer to pay for gas and bait.
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Old 04-20-2010, 06:20 PM
 
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This discussion illustrates that what's true in what part of Alaska may not be the case in other parts, and again, Anchorage prices aren't representative of the rest of the state. Generally, the further out you go, the more expensive things in the store will be, and the more access you'll actually have to wild foods.

I hope that I didn't mislead anyone with my comment about spending less money on food when I'm in AK than when I'm in Oregon....although it's true, I don't live in Anchorage. I personally don't know how practical it is for people who live in the more urban parts of the state to replace grocery store proteins with wild food.

It's like this in my village. For instance, when the sockeye run opens for subsistence, everyone who's able and has the gear is out getting the fish, and the people who can't participate for whatever reason end up with fish anyway from neighbors, friends, relatives...

I'm guessing that in Anchorage it might be more of an individual effort that might be practical for some but not so much for others.

Alaska Summer Ale is a couple bucks more a six pack than it is in the -48

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Old 04-20-2010, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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These photos of grocery prices are from last June. Walmart has opened one of their mega stores in Anchorage last winter that now includes groceries so the prices have come down a bit.

Picasa Web Albums - Chilkoot - Anchorage Gro...
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Old 04-20-2010, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Valdez, Alaska
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Kash, Austin (and most of Texas) is pretty cheap for most things. Anchorage may be more expensive if you're coming from a relatively inexpensive place. But a lot of people aren't, and that's what I was talking about (I already mentioned that prices in North Texas are cheaper than both here and what I saw in Anchorage). Maybe Tampa is some odd anomaly when it comes to grocery prices, but all I was saying is that they're about the same as Anchorage. I was actually really surprised by that when I was there. As far as produce goes, our out of season prices are about what's on the Safeway flier right now. I'm sure we do generally have better prices (and perhaps better quality, but it all looked fine to me up there) for things that are in season, although avocados, mangoes, potatoes, and organic apples (and Florida orange juice, for Pete's sake!) are cheaper up there than what I just saw at the store yesterday.

Last edited by tigre79; 04-20-2010 at 06:59 PM..
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Old 04-20-2010, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigre79 View Post
Kash, Austin (and most of Texas) is pretty cheap for most things. Anchorage may be more expensive if you're coming from a relatively inexpensive place. But a lot of people aren't, and that's what I was talking about (I already mentioned that prices in North Texas are cheaper than both here and what I saw in Anchorage). Maybe Tampa is some odd anomaly when it comes to grocery prices, but all I was saying is that they're about the same as Anchorage. I was actually really surprised by that when I was there. As far as produce goes, our out of season prices are about what's on the Safeway flier right now. I'm sure we do generally have better prices (and perhaps better quality, but it all looked fine to me up there) for things that are in season, although avocados, mangoes, potatoes, and organic apples (and Florida orange juice, for Pete's sake!) are cheaper up there than what I just saw at the store yesterday.
NoooooOOO!Oooo!OO!O! I hope to goodness Tampa prices are not similar to Anchorage. I was hoping the prices to feed my family would be much less.
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Old 04-20-2010, 11:04 PM
 
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In Oregon I spend about $700 for a family of 6 a month. I have young kids that eat like birds though. When I was up there I just bought sippy cups and some snacks and they were similar prices to OR. The milk and eggs and bread were the same price, i noticed the bananas were .20 more. You are right Kash, I have spent the last several months comparing Safeway and Freds and yes prices overall are slightly more, which when added up, does inc the monthly food budget. I guess I was expecting AK to be expensive like I've heard HI is. Glad it wasn't. Gas is .30 more a gallon than here too.
Off Subject:
It was so cute, when I was on the plane, I sat next to a little 87 yr old gal named Mary. She told me that when she moved to ANC in '47 there were 5000 people that lived there. She said now everyone keeps moving up there so they can get the oil dividend. She said " and once they move here they keep having babies so they can get more money" Just thought it was funny, but probably sadly true. That is not why we are moving there.
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Old 04-20-2010, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Valdez, Alaska
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Aw, buck up, Kash. Gas is cheaper ($2.70-2.80 at the moment) and you can buy a house for a song thanks to all the speculators and other folks who got in over their heads down here in the last several years. But yeah, I don't think you'll be saving much at the grocery store. I don't really think our prices are too high, but this isn't the cheapest place in the world to live, either.
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Old 04-21-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Anchorage
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I can't get out of Fred Meyer for under $250, usually a bit more than that, for a family of 5. But my boys are growing teenagers and are bottomless pits to feed. And that does include sodas and paper products, shampoo and soaps. When we first came up from West Texas it was almost a form of entertainment to go to the stores and be amazed over the cost differences, but we've gotten used to it now and it seems normal. Every now and then I'm caught by surprise - I always buy at least one package of flour tortillas; the boys like breakfast burritos and we eat a lot of Mexicanish type dishes. I never looked at the prices, figured it would be like a dollar or two.... wrong!... $5.79!! LOL - but I bought them anyway.
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Old 04-21-2010, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach
3,381 posts, read 9,082,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigre79 View Post
Aw, buck up, Kash. Gas is cheaper ($2.70-2.80 at the moment) and you can buy a house for a song thanks to all the speculators and other folks who got in over their heads down here in the last several years. But yeah, I don't think you'll be saving much at the grocery store. I don't really think our prices are too high, but this isn't the cheapest place in the world to live, either.

I;m going to rent a year before buying a home to see what the market does. Housing costs in the area is one of the several reasons why we decided upon Tampa. Always wanted to live in Florida, but the housing was just too high at the time. I feel terrible for homeowners who bought in the bubble and are now hurting tremendously, however it seems to be a great period of opportunity for me.
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