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Old 03-29-2008, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Liberty, IL (moving to Shelbyville, IL)
64 posts, read 365,179 times
Reputation: 43

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After the recent flooding here in the Midwest, I am considering moving to Arizona where there is much less rain and no snow. I have always known that Arizona is the hottest state in the United States in terms of temperatures, but then found out that Illinois is 2-4 times more humid in the summers than Arizona. Despite the fact that Arizona heat is "dry", I always hear people complain that it's so hot, they can't breathe. I know that the opinion of what AZ heat feels like can vary significantly from person to person, but how does it really feel like? Here in Illinois, we sometimes get temperatures that are just as bad...except there's much more humidity. People I know who have visited Arizona say that the lack of humidity makes you not sweat, which would probably feel more comfortable to me!
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Old 03-29-2008, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,098 posts, read 37,722,888 times
Reputation: 4934
Let's me be up front - during the summer, particularily July and August, it gets HOT, dang hot! You will have 20 to 30 days in a row with highs @ 110 or above. AND, in August, we usually have our monsoons - which adds some lovely humidity to the mix.The trick is, how to HANDLE the heat.

First, you plan your outdoor activities around the heat - shopping in the morning - not the heat of the day. Same with other outdoor activities.

Next, you will drink a LOT of water - not beer - not softdrinks - WATER. AND, if you are outside and stop sweating - you are in danger of heat stroke - WATER.

Then, dress accordingly - no nylons or silks. Cotton is best. AND, LONG SLEEVES during the day. It will actually keep you cooler. And, if outside during the day, give serious consideration to wearing a hat. Good sunglasses too.

The first summer tends to be the "worst" one - but, if you follow some simple things - it really is not that bad.

Welcome.
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Old 03-29-2008, 02:38 PM
 
3,632 posts, read 15,559,346 times
Reputation: 1321
Set your oven to 110 and step in for a while -- that's what it feels like! It's HOT!!!
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Old 03-29-2008, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Liberty, IL (moving to Shelbyville, IL)
64 posts, read 365,179 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
Let's me be up front - during the summer, particularily July and August, it gets HOT, dang hot! You will have 20 to 30 days in a row with highs @ 110 or above. AND, in August, we usually have our monsoons - which adds some lovely humidity to the mix.The trick is, how to HANDLE the heat.

First, you plan your outdoor activities around the heat - shopping in the morning - not the heat of the day. Same with other outdoor activities.

Next, you will drink a LOT of water - not beer - not softdrinks - WATER. AND, if you are outside and stop sweating - you are in danger of heat stroke - WATER.

Then, dress accordingly - no nylons or silks. Cotton is best. AND, LONG SLEEVES during the day. It will actually keep you cooler. And, if outside during the day, give serious consideration to wearing a hat. Good sunglasses too.

The first summer tends to be the "worst" one - but, if you follow some simple things - it really is not that bad.

Welcome.
I don't drink alcohol anyways, so at least you don't have to worry about that

Does Gatorade or Propel count as "water"?
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Old 03-29-2008, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Tucson
42,835 posts, read 84,937,356 times
Reputation: 22814
Quote:
Originally Posted by sablebaby View Post
Set your oven to 110 and step in for a while -- that's what it feels like! It's HOT!!!
That or your hair dryer set on high heat blowing in your face - both can give you a good idea!
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Old 03-29-2008, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,098 posts, read 37,722,888 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clint_Noname View Post
I don't drink alcohol anyways, so at least you don't have to worry about that

Does Gatorade or Propel count as "water"?
Yes - they will work - they have the electrolites to help as well. But, you may find that water will be your mainstay. But - you are on the right track!!
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Old 03-29-2008, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
36,974 posts, read 47,227,059 times
Reputation: 25740
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
Let's me be up front - during the summer, particularily July and August, it gets HOT, dang hot! You will have 20 to 30 days in a row with highs @ 110 or above. AND, in August, we usually have our monsoons - which adds some lovely humidity to the mix.The trick is, how to HANDLE the heat.

First, you plan your outdoor activities around the heat - shopping in the morning - not the heat of the day. Same with other outdoor activities.

Next, you will drink a LOT of water - not beer - not softdrinks - WATER. AND, if you are outside and stop sweating - you are in danger of heat stroke - WATER.

Then, dress accordingly - no nylons or silks. Cotton is best. AND, LONG SLEEVES during the day. It will actually keep you cooler. And, if outside during the day, give serious consideration to wearing a hat. Good sunglasses too.

The first summer tends to be the "worst" one - but, if you follow some simple things - it really is not that bad.

Welcome.
The average number of days above 110 is 10 for the whole summer - June, July, August and September. June has the hottest temps right at the end and then temps drop when the moisture arrives and it stays around 105-108 with an occasional 110+ through July and August. Maybe that is splitting hairs, but it is a (frequent) exaggeration that much of the summer is over 110 . And 115 is rare.

You do sweat here. It just evaporates quickly and you stay relatively dry. It's really not the heat that gets to you, it's the length of the hot season. I think it is very much the same experience as a long midwestern winter in terms of one's frustrations. The big advantage here is that you can drive for 2-4 hours and leave the heat behind and enter a cool, green world. Of course, you gotta come back to work eventually. Ugh.
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Old 03-29-2008, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,098 posts, read 37,722,888 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderosa View Post
The average number of days above 110 is 10 for the whole summer - June, July, August and September. June has the hottest temps right at the end and then temps drop when the moisture arrives and it stays around 105-108 with an occasional 110+ through July and August. Maybe that is splitting hairs, but it is a (frequent) exaggeration that much of the summer is over 110 . And 115 is rare.
As a person, born and raised and a lifelong resident (60 years), we will have many stretches of 110 and above. 115 is not that uncommone.

Now - 118 and above is rare - but, it happens just about every summer
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Old 03-29-2008, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
36,974 posts, read 47,227,059 times
Reputation: 25740
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
As a person, born and raised and a lifelong resident (60 years), we will have many stretches of 110 and above. 115 is not that uncommone.

Now - 118 and above is rare - but, it happens just about every summer
Look it up. I've posted NOAA statistics on the forum on several occasions.
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Old 03-29-2008, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,098 posts, read 37,722,888 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderosa View Post
Look it up. I've posted NOAA statistics on the forum on several occasions.
And, what you are forgetting is, those numbers are from the Airport - that frequently, the numbers, from various reporting stations, around the valley are higher.
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