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Old 10-25-2009, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Red Rock, Arizona
683 posts, read 2,545,652 times
Reputation: 512

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Yes, and no. There's a very good story in the Arizona Republic today.

Farms looked at as water resources vanish

.................

What flows through this watery Grand Central Station could fill the needs of all the homes and offices in Phoenix, Tucson, Las Vegas and much of Southern California.

...................

In Arizona, the crops yield about 1 percent of the state's annual economic output, yet the fields soak up 70 percent of the water supply. That outsize allotment has painted a target on the farms as urban water managers search for the next bucket of water to meet future demands.

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 10-25-2009 at 12:26 PM.. Reason: can only quote a couple of sentences from an article, too long a quote
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Old 10-25-2009, 01:12 PM
 
2,942 posts, read 6,181,152 times
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There's a huge underground aquifer under southern Arizona. Nobody knows just how much water is there, but it's a lot.

Agriculterally speaking, (as the AZ Republic points out--well, sort of) much of the water used in farming is from the Central Arizona Project Canal, which is Colorado River water. Unless the Rockie's fail to get snow, this is a consistant source of water that does not effect the drinking water supply.

I think Arizona (southern AZ, especially) is a great example of how to manage water responsibly. Most voluntarily (and happily) use xeriscape. Golf courses use reclaimed water. Lots of man-made lakes (or reserves) to diversify the water supply.

I've never seen imposed water restrictions in southern Arizona, but my family near Dallas has them almost every year. In fact, it got so bad (in the summer of 2008) that my dad had to collect lake water with buckets to keep his plants and trees from dying (he lives near a lake).
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Old 10-25-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
17,593 posts, read 23,481,856 times
Reputation: 9954
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyBaroo View Post
Yes, and no. There's a very good story in the Arizona Republic today.

Farms looked at as water resources vanish

.................

What flows through this watery Grand Central Station could fill the needs of all the homes and offices in Phoenix, Tucson, Las Vegas and much of Southern California.

...................

In Arizona, the crops yield about 1 percent of the state's annual economic output, yet the fields soak up 70 percent of the water supply. That outsize allotment has painted a target on the farms as urban water managers search for the next bucket of water to meet future demands.
I'll believe it when they close the Golf Courses
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Old 10-25-2009, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,098 posts, read 37,732,400 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boompa View Post
I'll believe it when they close the Golf Courses
Golf courses are not watered with potable water. They are watered with grey water
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Old 10-25-2009, 08:11 PM
 
Location: La Crosse, WI
149 posts, read 300,407 times
Reputation: 127
I've always thought we could trade you Arizonians some of our clear, cold water for some of you hot skinny women? We'd even throw in a few plus sized ladies to make it fair ?

I still don't get why this country doesn't have water pipes running from areas of TOO much water to areas that have none. They could meter it somehow? I see areas of Missouri have had over 20 inches of rain just this month! So much good freshwater is dumped into the gulf of Mexico every second...
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Old 10-25-2009, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
31,304 posts, read 31,281,996 times
Reputation: 84445
Water, electricity, and shade are all that’s needed to keep the state hospital for humans. People who waste water shouldn’t live in the desert; however there seems to be a good number of them are trying to keep their yards green with processed city drinking water. Washing the car in the driveway with the garden hose and tap-water instead of going to the carwash.

If Arizona has a brown out or black out in the summer months most of the entire state will suffer from lack of A/C cooling.

Our desert is fragile and we must be better at living in harmony with nature or we’ll be in real trouble.
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Old 01-03-2010, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Tampa
3,982 posts, read 10,037,469 times
Reputation: 1195
read something here that was very interesting

Arizona at a crossroads over water and growth

Arizona is at significant risk of losing a big slice of its Colorado River supplies because of the deal it cut with California in 1968 in return for California's support for federal funding of the Central Arizona Project. In the event of water shortages, the deal calls for Arizona's entire CAP supply to be cut off before California is cut back 1 gallon. CAP water is a significant amount of the total used in the Phoenix area, and it is the only sustainable supply available to Tucson.

If that is true, and Cali keeps growing, ouch!
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Old 01-04-2010, 02:10 AM
 
259 posts, read 668,189 times
Reputation: 162
California's population is well beyond 40 million people and rising fast.
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Old 01-04-2010, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Sonoran Desert
37,024 posts, read 47,261,438 times
Reputation: 25775
California is not entitled to more water based on population increases. The poster a couple up is misinterpreting the quoted statement.

Last edited by Ponderosa; 01-04-2010 at 07:26 AM..
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Old 01-04-2010, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Tampa
3,982 posts, read 10,037,469 times
Reputation: 1195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderosa View Post
California is not entitled to more water based on population increases. The poster a couple up is misinterpreting the quoted statement.
according to the article, cali gets first dibs on arizonas water before they have to give up any.
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