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Old 05-08-2013, 08:12 AM
 
41,397 posts, read 25,653,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Have to correct about 1 thing, you said until recently AR voted Dem at state level but Republican at the national level; this is 100% wrong: until 2010 both state and national level was Democrat. The tide changed with Lincoln lost (but it only changed slightly) In 2012 is when the state went Republican nationally for the first time since the civil war.
Nita, Arkansas has voted for Republican Presidential candidates several times before 2012. Do you really think the state voted for Mondale?

Arkansas was a solid Southern Democratic state post Civil War, and that pretty much continued until World War II. Southern Democrats were more conservative than Democrats in the rest of the country, and at times were more conservative than Republicans in the rest of the country. They formed a particular Democratic voting bloc in Congress. After World War II, there was a shift. Eisenhower won over many conservative Democrats because of his military service, and won over many conservative Democrats who found Adlai Stevenson to be too liberal. That gave the Republican Party in Arkansas a base to work with. Nelson Rockefeller's successful gubernatorial run gave the Republican Party credibility and, more importantly, a network for fundraising that underwrites the Republicans to this day. Businessmen were particularly attracted to the Republican Party, and not surprisingly, the business centers in Arkansas became the Republican bastions. Despite many posters assertions, Little Rock has been both a Republican and a Democratic stronghold. As the political center of the state, it's had more political diversity, and because of the Republican businessmen centered there, it's had an outspoken and powerful Republican base. Northwest Arkansas has similarly had more political diversity, largely because the University. While universities are largely considered to be sources of more liberal politics, they also attract people with many divergent opinions, which creates more political diversity. Republican-leaning businessmen have led the economic growth of Washington & Benton Counties, as well as the politics of the area. Some people seem to think that this area's Republican tendencies have only developed in the past couple of decades, with the tremendous growth of the area and the influx of people from out of state. That's not true. John Paul Hammerschmidt. Even in the 1960's, Northwest Arkansas was sending Republicans to Congress.

It's a testament to the complexity of Arkansas politics, that the most liberal areas, Northwest Arkansas and Little Rock, have been the mainspring for the Republican party in the state, while the rest of the state, dominated by the Democrat Party, has maintained the most socially conservative attitudes.

Last edited by DC at the Ridge; 05-08-2013 at 08:21 AM..
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:58 PM
 
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Tried to rep ya, DC, but the genie wouldn't let me.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:34 PM
 
1,162 posts, read 2,072,383 times
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Arkansas voted for George Bush in 2000, 2004, McCain in 2008, and Romney in 2012. The interesting part is that the Republican share of the vote consistently increased from around 51% in 2000 to 60% in 2012.

Arkansas also voted for Bush I in 1988 and Reagan in 1984 and 1980.

Clinton was the only Democrat to carry Arkansas since 1980. Given that he was the state governor it's not so surprising.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Have to correct about 1 thing, you said until recently AR voted Dem at state level but Republican at the national level; this is 100% wrong: until 2010 both state and national level was Democrat. The tide changed with Lincoln lost (but it only changed slightly) In 2012 is when the state went Republican nationally for the first time since the civil war.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,590 posts, read 88,318,961 times
Reputation: 46411
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC at the Ridge View Post
Nita, Arkansas has voted for Republican Presidential candidates several times before 2012. Do you really think the state voted for Mondale?

Arkansas was a solid Southern Democratic state post Civil War, and that pretty much continued until World War II. Southern Democrats were more conservative than Democrats in the rest of the country, and at times were more conservative than Republicans in the rest of the country. They formed a particular Democratic voting bloc in Congress. After World War II, there was a shift. Eisenhower won over many conservative Democrats because of his military service, and won over many conservative Democrats who found Adlai Stevenson to be too liberal. That gave the Republican Party in Arkansas a base to work with. Nelson Rockefeller's successful gubernatorial run gave the Republican Party credibility and, more importantly, a network for fundraising that underwrites the Republicans to this day. Businessmen were particularly attracted to the Republican Party, and not surprisingly, the business centers in Arkansas became the Republican bastions. Despite many posters assertions, Little Rock has been both a Republican and a Democratic stronghold. As the political center of the state, it's had more political diversity, and because of the Republican businessmen centered there, it's had an outspoken and powerful Republican base. Northwest Arkansas has similarly had more political diversity, largely because the University. While universities are largely considered to be sources of more liberal politics, they also attract people with many divergent opinions, which creates more political diversity. Republican-leaning businessmen have led the economic growth of Washington & Benton Counties, as well as the politics of the area. Some people seem to think that this area's Republican tendencies have only developed in the past couple of decades, with the tremendous growth of the area and the influx of people from out of state. That's not true. John Paul Hammerschmidt. Even in the 1960's, Northwest Arkansas was sending Republicans to Congress.

It's a testament to the complexity of Arkansas politics, that the most liberal areas, Northwest Arkansas and Little Rock, have been the mainspring for the Republican party in the state, while the rest of the state, dominated by the Democrat Party, has maintained the most socially conservative attitudes.
Oh, I know they have voted Republican for Pres, but I was more referring to the comment about the state voting Republican overall nationally. That is like saying, CA is votes Red nationally because, in many years they have voted for Republicans for Pres. I was also referring to the state overall, not NWA. I think most of us, especially those living here know that Benton and Washington Co are Republican strong holds. I think the responders comments were a little to generalized.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,590 posts, read 88,318,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallybalt View Post
Arkansas voted for George Bush in 2000, 2004, McCain in 2008, and Romney in 2012. The interesting part is that the Republican share of the vote consistently increased from around 51% in 2000 to 60% in 2012.

Arkansas also voted for Bush I in 1988 and Reagan in 1984 and 1980.

Clinton was the only Democrat to carry Arkansas since 1980. Given that he was the state governor it's not so surprising.
I was not referring to the Pres election, but the statement about AR being Republican nationally. How many senators until recently have been Republican and how many in the house of representatives? There is more to elections that the Pres. There are a lot of states that vote one way for Pres, but elect their congressmen and women primarily from the opposite party. That was my point. I guess I didn't make myself clear, I should have said, first time since the civil war the congressional reps have been Republican, overall.
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Old 05-09-2013, 08:19 AM
 
41,397 posts, read 25,653,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Oh, I know they have voted Republican for Pres, but I was more referring to the comment about the state voting Republican overall nationally. That is like saying, CA is votes Red nationally because, in many years they have voted for Republicans for Pres. I was also referring to the state overall, not NWA. I think most of us, especially those living here know that Benton and Washington Co are Republican strong holds. I think the responders comments were a little to generalized.
The Presidential election is generally considered how a state votes nationally. People actually say that CA is Blue nationally, because they generally vote for Democrats for President. As is often pointed out, CA is not Blue. It's purple. The nation is purple. Population centers tend to be more blue, rural areas tend to be more red. CA is an example of why the national popular vote is a bad idea. Because the urban areas dominate the political debate to the exclusion of rural areas, and make them irrelevant. It's that process that makes CA a state where, in the Presidential election, the Republican campaign's efforts tend to be half-hearted, they aren't going to win the state, and the Democrat campaign's efforts luke-warm, they are going to win the state so they don't need to dedicate much in the way of resources. Because of the winner-take-all system, how a state votes in the Presidential election is how a state gets labeled red or blue. It's wrong, I know, I've contended for decades now, that Presidential elections are not the way to assess a state's political leanings, but people continue to do so. I subscribe to Tip O'Neill's viewpoint, "All politics is local."
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Old 05-09-2013, 03:29 PM
 
263 posts, read 241,818 times
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In my opinion the state state is conservative with the exceptions of NWA & LR.
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Old 05-09-2013, 05:35 PM
 
1,366 posts, read 1,173,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC at the Ridge View Post
The Presidential election is generally considered how a state votes nationally. People actually say that CA is Blue nationally, because they generally vote for Democrats for President. As is often pointed out, CA is not Blue. It's purple. The nation is purple. Population centers tend to be more blue, rural areas tend to be more red. CA is an example of why the national popular vote is a bad idea. Because the urban areas dominate the political debate to the exclusion of rural areas, and make them irrelevant. It's that process that makes CA a state where, in the Presidential election, the Republican campaign's efforts tend to be half-hearted, they aren't going to win the state, and the Democrat campaign's efforts luke-warm, they are going to win the state so they don't need to dedicate much in the way of resources. Because of the winner-take-all system, how a state votes in the Presidential election is how a state gets labeled red or blue. It's wrong, I know, I've contended for decades now, that Presidential elections are not the way to assess a state's political leanings, but people continue to do so. I subscribe to Tip O'Neill's viewpoint, "All politics is local."

All politics truly is local.
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Old 05-11-2013, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 15,482,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderlove View Post
In my opinion the state state is conservative with the exceptions of NWA & LR.
NWA is for the most part conservative, but there are liberal pockets especially in Fayetteville.
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Old 05-12-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,590 posts, read 88,318,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
NWA is for the most part conservative, but there are liberal pockets especially in Fayetteville.
I am glad you pointed that out. I didn't want to continue the debate one what was and was not Republican or conservative versus what is, so I didn't make any comment, but yes, NWA, overall is conservative. There are both sides, which is good, and there certainly are pockets of registered Democrats that still are conservative and registered Republicans that lean liberal. I know here in Bella Vista, we have friends from all sides of the fence and to all degrees.
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