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Old 03-26-2013, 09:42 AM
fzx fzx started this thread
 
399 posts, read 511,763 times
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I came across the website called Atlanta Classical Academy, which intends to set up a charter in the north Atlanta area to accomodate k-10, 700 students.

I have heard things that a charter school can drain the resources for public schools, which have fixed infrastructure to cover. In addition, if I remember it correctly, the reason for North Atlanta high to draw from southen clusters is that the student pool was not enough to justify its existance at one point. North atlanta has relatively better elementary school sys and arguably OK middle school, so I am wondering if it needs to have a brand new one while the middle school and high school hasve remodeled/expanded or in the process of doing so.

My questions are:

Is the new school necessary?
If the rich can afford sending their kids to private, most of the case in Buckhead, will the school have enough students? Or who is their target markets?
How far the orgnization has been progressed?
How the legistration enviorment in the state and city regarding the charter school?

Thanks,
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Old 03-26-2013, 12:19 PM
 
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Well, it would give people a choice. Not everyone in north Atlanta is loaded and the public schools up there tend to get the short end of the stick when it comes to financing.

As I understand it charter schools are still public schools so if it helps keep parents and kids involved in public schools it might be a good thing.
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
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I don't know why everybody assumes everybody zoned to N. Atlanta is wealthy. I believe a charter would be good for competition. Most wealthy people whole live in Buckhead come from the private school culture and they won't use public school period. It has little to do with APS.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:54 PM
 
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In the last five years, the number of neighborhood kids attending NAHS has doubled, and that trend will likely continue. More kids are going on to Sutton instead of switching to private school, and more are staying through high school, which is great news for our community. Many private school parents I speak with feel like the tuition is a financial reach for them--no, they aren't all extremely wealthy. I think Atlanta Classical will impact Buckhead only by giving NAHS another reason to improve. . .from what I have read about ACA, its lottery will be open to all students who live in the Atlanta Public Schools district, not just the NAHS cluster. If that is the case, it won't have a radical impact on the cluster, as only a few students will win a spot. I imagine there will be many, many applicants, and chances of getting a spot will be slim. Excited to see how ACA evolves, for sure...
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Old 03-28-2013, 10:15 AM
fzx fzx started this thread
 
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AtlJan,

The lottery sys stated sounds fair. However, if it gonna open to the APS in the long-term, why they want a north atlanta location vs. cheaper alternatives available?

How does the Sandy-spring/Riverwood charter work? It seems to cater to the neighbourhood first before opening its lottery sys.
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Old 03-28-2013, 12:32 PM
 
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fzx, I agree and have the same questions...
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Old 03-28-2013, 02:21 PM
 
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Sandy Springs Middle and Riverwood are conversion charters. That means they were traditional neighborhood public schools that converted to charter status to gain some flexibility from state and local system rules/regulations. These schools keep their attendance zones.

Conversion charters are very different than start ups. Start ups are fully autonomous from the local school system and conversion schools are not.
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Old 03-29-2013, 07:14 AM
fzx fzx started this thread
 
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Lastminutemon,

thanks for the answer. I have a follow-up qestion: why the school will agree to convert? Teachers will lose their benefits from a public school employees. Was it because local community voted to do so? I tried to google Riverwood's history but found nothing.
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Old 03-29-2013, 10:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lastminutemom View Post
Sandy Springs Middle and Riverwood are conversion charters. That means they were traditional neighborhood public schools that converted to charter status to gain some flexibility from state and local system rules/regulations. These schools keep their attendance zones.

Conversion charters are very different than start ups. Start ups are fully autonomous from the local school system and conversion schools are not.
Thanks, lastminutemom.

So is this how it works?

-- a conversion charter keeps its original attendance zone, and if there are still vacancies anybody in the district can apply

-- a new charter is open to everybody in the district from day one

I have never been clear on that.
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Old 03-30-2013, 06:36 AM
 
416 posts, read 972,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaLakeSearch View Post
I don't know why everybody assumes everybody zoned to N. Atlanta is wealthy. I believe a charter would be good for competition. Most wealthy people whole live in Buckhead come from the private school culture and they won't use public school period. It has little to do with APS.
Exactly....and the true deep-pocketed aren't bothering with the local day schools. Maryland/Virginia or international boarding schools are the preference.
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