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Old 04-05-2013, 09:22 PM
 
142 posts, read 247,030 times
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How much does it cost for leveling backyard with slope? ( 60 feet x16 feet and 10 feet depth). I find it would be cheap if there were no houses around because you could bring the dump truck directly. But I am referring to already built out sub division with relatively less access. Any idea?
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Old 04-06-2013, 04:49 PM
 
31,048 posts, read 30,398,082 times
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That's going to take a good bit of dirt, I'd say a good dozen truckloads. I don't think I'd want to be pushing that much dirt around in a subdivision with a dozer.

Can you make a deal with your neighbor let a truck through somehow, assuming you will be responsible for putting everything back together? You also need to think about what kind of dirt you need and compacting, drainage, silt fencing and so forth.

On the other hand, why not just take advantage of the slope and do some nice terracing? Often a difficult piece of land can be turned into something really spectacular. We were just visiting some friends a couple of weeks who found an incredible tract down in a holler that nobody else wanted because they all said it was too hard to get to. But you should see what they've done with that steep hillside -- it will make your eyes pop!
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Old 04-06-2013, 06:19 PM
 
142 posts, read 247,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
That's going to take a good bit of dirt, I'd say a good dozen truckloads. I don't think I'd want to be pushing that much dirt around in a subdivision with a dozer.

Can you make a deal with your neighbor let a truck through somehow, assuming you will be responsible for putting everything back together? You also need to think about what kind of dirt you need and compacting, drainage, silt fencing and so forth.

On the other hand, why not just take advantage of the slope and do some nice terracing? Often a difficult piece of land can be turned into something really spectacular. We were just visiting some friends a couple of weeks who found an incredible tract down in a holler that nobody else wanted because they all said it was too hard to get to. But you should see what they've done with that steep hillside -- it will make your eyes pop!
Thanks. Will IM you
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Southeast, where else?
3,914 posts, read 4,702,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ridesmart View Post
How much does it cost for leveling backyard with slope? ( 60 feet x16 feet and 10 feet depth). I find it would be cheap if there were no houses around because you could bring the dump truck directly. But I am referring to already built out sub division with relatively less access. Any idea?
Keep drainage in mind. That water has to go somewhere and if you inadvertently route it to a neighbor, he and his attorney Sal are going to have something to say...are you going to have a taper or build a cliff 10 feet high and call your house "The Bluffs of....". You get the idea. Sounds like 8-14 dump trucks full depending on the taper. If hey can use a small skid steer it will take 3 days to include cleanup and the arguments with neighbors.

Good luck and be real careful with that drainage.
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Old 04-07-2013, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Sweet Home...CHICAGO
3,390 posts, read 4,558,471 times
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No matter what you do, make sure you have your permits first. Consult your county planning office and see if any site plans are required. Those costs will need to be factored into the work you plan to have done as well.
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Old 04-07-2013, 03:17 PM
 
31,048 posts, read 30,398,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ridesmart View Post
Thanks. Will IM you
ridesmart, I'm sorry to say I didn't take any photos.

But just google up "Landscaping a slope" and you will get tons of great ideas and beautiful images.

A steep slope can become a fantastic canvas. It can also give your yard more privacy and interest than a flat yard.

Here are some great examples of what people have done with slopes.

Residential Steep Slope Landscaping Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel, and Decor

This is one of my personal favorites:

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Old 04-07-2013, 05:31 PM
 
142 posts, read 247,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caleb Longstreet View Post
Keep drainage in mind. That water has to go somewhere and if you inadvertently route it to a neighbor, he and his attorney Sal are going to have something to say...are you going to have a taper or build a cliff 10 feet high and call your house "The Bluffs of....". You get the idea. Sounds like 8-14 dump trucks full depending on the taper. If hey can use a small skid steer it will take 3 days to include cleanup and the arguments with neighbors.

Good luck and be real careful with that drainage.
Thanks its a downward slope.
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:37 PM
 
142 posts, read 247,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
ridesmart, I'm sorry to say I didn't take any photos.

But just google up "Landscaping a slope" and you will get tons of great ideas and beautiful images.

A steep slope can become a fantastic canvas. It can also give your yard more privacy and interest than a flat yard.

Here are some great examples of what people have done with slopes.

Residential Steep Slope Landscaping Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel, and Decor

This is one of my personal favorites:
Thanks
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
15,498 posts, read 57,942,040 times
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Engineer's letter and stamp for the retaining wall
Permit for the work- which will have to be signed by the engineer- ain't NO inspector gonna put his initials on that!
Trucks, skid-steer, dirt, wall material, gravel, pipe, landscaping material(sod), LABOR! It's all mostly done by hand. Etc., etc.

For that size, limited access, and all of the previously mentioned;
About $18-20k.
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Old 04-09-2013, 06:27 AM
 
2,167 posts, read 2,417,497 times
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The retaining wall is where a majority of the costs will come in. Depends on where you live, but generally once you get above 3 feet it requires permits and engineering. A geogrid reinforced wall would be required for 10' high, which will get expensive fast. You might be able to save some money by terracing (building two 5' walls), but this is still a big project that carries lots of liability if done poorly.

Just some quick and dirty math:
60'x16'x10' = 9600 cubic feet
Assuming the slope is a 45 degree angle, you need to fill in roughly half that amount, or 4800 cubic feet

There are 27 cubic feet per cubic yard of dirt, so you would require about 177 cubic yards of dirt. A typical tandem axle dump truck is going to hold about 12 yards of material, so you are looking at roughly 15 dump trucks full of dirt. Once you factor in compaction, that number will go up quite a bit. If you assume compaction adds another 30% onto the number, you'd need about TWENTY dump trucks. Fill dirt is cheap (sometimes free), but with poor site access that is already many thousands of dollars in dirt/hauling/bobcat/compacting costs.

Assuming you need a retaining wall 60'x10', that is 600 square feet of wall face. A decent estimate for each retaining wall block, which is about 1 SF of wall face, would be $6. That is $3,600 just in blocks alone. You still need drainage rock, drain pipe, and geogrid . . . which could easily raise that by 50%. So maybe you need $5-6,000 in materials to build the wall. You can probably take that number and double it for a labor estimate, and I haven't included any contractor markup.

So yeah, it becomes a $20k project pretty quickly.
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