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Old 11-17-2013, 05:04 PM
 
30,554 posts, read 29,000,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
The Braves get a lot of out of town visitors also.What about the convention traffic that comes to Atlanta for a weekend?Would not Cobb benefit from those tourist dollars?
That's a valid point. I don't know where conventioneers stay these days but I would guess a good many of them stay downtown. If that's the case, it would be easier to get to the Ted than to the new stadium.
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,971,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
Very interesting and dispassionate piece that accurately describes the landscape here. My favorite quote was:

"The Cobb County site is actually more in line with a new ethos of urbanism that rewards smaller, walkable communities, said Chris Leinberger, a professor at the George Washington University School of Business. This year, he released a study of new urban development patterns in the Atlanta metro area as part of his work for the Brookings Institution. In it, many parts of suburban Atlanta had a more urban feel than the city itself. “The whole concept of city versus suburb is a really obsolete concept, and moving the baseball stadium reflects that,” he said."

So that area is "walkable"?LOLWell I guess it will be at least,but not at the present time.
No part of Cobb County(especially that area) is in NO way more Urban than the city.Sure there are parts of the city that lack urbanity but overall NO.
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,862 posts, read 15,489,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
I said I could be wrong.Funny how all of those you mentioned are actually in the city.
Not at all. I am not somehow advocating for "suburban stadium vs downtown stadium" as you somehow feel. Of course many of those cities are much smaller and have different demographics.

It always seems to get overlooked that the largest city in the nation has (for many years) had baseball stadiums way out of the core business district and in the residential neighborhoods. NYC has never had sports teams outside the residential areas where their fans lived.

In Brooklyn, Ebbets Field was built when that area was still almost semi-rural in nature. It was certainly a residential area for many years after that. The Polo Grounds were also built in an area that was almost in the country when it was built, and later was in a suburban residential neighborhood. Same for Yankee stadium. Shea came later, but was certainly built well out of the hustle and bustle and in what was in the early 1960s the outskirts of Queens and a residential area. The Meadowlands isn't even in the same state.

Wrigley Field in Chicago is not in the core of downtown Chicago. In fact, it's probably not much closer than the proposed Cobb stadium is to downtown Atlanta. So let's not pretend that there is some engrained tradition of sports teams and stadiums being in the downtown area of a city.
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Home of the Braves
1,164 posts, read 1,032,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
So that area is "walkable"?LOLWell I guess it will be at least,but not at the present time.
No part of Cobb County(especially that area) is in NO way more Urban than the city.Sure there are parts of the city that lack urbanity but overall NO.
Turner Field has a walk score of 38. It's a wasteland. The area around Windy Ridge and Cobb Pkwy scores about 30 points higher before a shovel has even hit dirt. Walk scores are never perfectly reliable, but in this case, the numbers don't lie.
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
294 posts, read 385,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neil0311 View Post
That is NOT what I read on the Braves site that described the project. It said 30K parking spots, with a stadium capacity of around 40K.
The article from AJC is where it talks about only 6000 spots on the development while using the parking around for the rest of the parking needs.



Plans for Braves complex begin to take shape Friday, Nov. 15, 2013

Think Disney World on the Chattahoochee — with a baseball stadium instead of rides, plus a bit of Atlantic Station thrown in.

The plans for the proposed Braves stadium complex in Cobb County came into clearer view Friday after The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained details of the planning for the site and surrounding area from people associated with the project. The plans still offer no solution to the area’s formidable highway congestion. They do, however, feature golf-cart-like trains like Disney’s circulating through the area, a soaring pedestrian bridge over I-285 to carry them, and a grand walkway flanked by new local shops and restaurants. Government officials emphasized that nothing is final and called it a “working plan.”

The whole plan is still subject to, at least, a vote by the Cobb County Commission on Nov. 26.

How to get people from their homes to the stadium gate remains one of the biggest problems with the proposed location, featuring a site that is smaller than Turner Field’s in an area congested with traffic. The plan allocates limited new transportation funding to deal with the added traffic, and government and Braves officials have not yet settled on what to build using it.

But once fans manage to reach the area, the vision aims to turn the transportation problem into an advantage. People would need to get out of their cars, walk around and start spending.

The Braves will only build perhaps 6,000 parking spaces at the stadium — 2,000 under the stadium, likely preferred parking — and perhaps 4,000 in a parking deck. For the rest, “there are north of 50,000 parking spaces already right around there that are not used at night,” said Tad Leithead, chairman of the Cumberland Community Improvement District, which will help fund the plan.

“What the Braves are trying to do is create an environment where they don’t have to build much parking but can use parking that’s already nearby,” Leithead said.

People could drive from home to a parking space in, for example, the Cobb Galleria Center. Then they could walk or be ferried by the “circulator” trams over I-285, across the pedestrian bridge to the complex.

And once they get to the complex, they wouldn’t be dropped off at the stadium gate. They would be at one end of a long pedestrian-only boulevard with hints of Atlantic Station: restaurants, shops, mixed development.

At the other end of the boulevard, the stadium. All they have to do to get there is walk the promenade, passing all those cash registers.

People staying at any of the hotels in the area of the district could also get ferried there, Leithead said. Or to the Cobb Energy Center one night, if they want to make a weekend of it.

“We think the return on investment here is magnificent,” Leithead said.

Cobb County Commission Chairman Tim Lee was also enthusiastic.

“It’s going to be transformational in the way people get moved around that community,” Lee said.

Much remains incomplete. The county and the district together are committing $24 million toward transportation improvements that were not already in the region’s budget. The pedestrian bridge will take up $3.5 million. Other desires, such as a dedicated ramp from the coming Northwest Corridor express lanes on I-75, could eat up the balance with lightning speed.

The AJC on Friday obtained a draft transportation plan drawn up by Cobb County, but in listing mostly projects that are already scheduled, it only serves to emphasize how much is yet to be planned.

Both Lee and Leithead said they are open to going back to the well in the future to request more transportation funding if the right transportation plan arises. Neither mentioned more tax increases.

“I realize there’s a lot of traffic in that area now, and I realize the Braves are going to add in the mix,” Leithead said. “But we’ve got three years and beyond” to come up with solutions.
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Old 11-17-2013, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,971,416 times
Reputation: 2955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron H View Post
Turner Field has a walk score of 38. It's a wasteland. The area around Windy Ridge and Cobb Pkwy scores about 30 points higher before a shovel has even hit dirt. Walk scores are never perfectly reliable, but in this case, the numbers don't lie.
But we are not talking just about the Turner Field area are we?No.
You know as well as I do that people come downtown and do other stuff.They either walk from Downtown,take Marta or take a shuttle.

Someone visiting from Birmingham or Charlotte is not gonna go hang out in Cumberland like they would Downtown Atlanta.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Atlanta ,GA
9,086 posts, read 13,971,416 times
Reputation: 2955
Quote:
Originally Posted by BackInATL2011 View Post
The article from AJC is where it talks about only 6000 spots on the development while using the parking around for the rest of the parking needs.



Plans for Braves complex begin to take shape Friday, Nov. 15, 2013

Think Disney World on the Chattahoochee — with a baseball stadium instead of rides, plus a bit of Atlantic Station thrown in.

The plans for the proposed Braves stadium complex in Cobb County came into clearer view Friday after The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained details of the planning for the site and surrounding area from people associated with the project. The plans still offer no solution to the area’s formidable highway congestion. They do, however, feature golf-cart-like trains like Disney’s circulating through the area, a soaring pedestrian bridge over I-285 to carry them, and a grand walkway flanked by new local shops and restaurants. Government officials emphasized that nothing is final and called it a “working plan.”

The whole plan is still subject to, at least, a vote by the Cobb County Commission on Nov. 26.

How to get people from their homes to the stadium gate remains one of the biggest problems with the proposed location, featuring a site that is smaller than Turner Field’s in an area congested with traffic. The plan allocates limited new transportation funding to deal with the added traffic, and government and Braves officials have not yet settled on what to build using it.

But once fans manage to reach the area, the vision aims to turn the transportation problem into an advantage. People would need to get out of their cars, walk around and start spending.

The Braves will only build perhaps 6,000 parking spaces at the stadium — 2,000 under the stadium, likely preferred parking — and perhaps 4,000 in a parking deck. For the rest, “there are north of 50,000 parking spaces already right around there that are not used at night,” said Tad Leithead, chairman of the Cumberland Community Improvement District, which will help fund the plan.

“What the Braves are trying to do is create an environment where they don’t have to build much parking but can use parking that’s already nearby,” Leithead said.

People could drive from home to a parking space in, for example, the Cobb Galleria Center. Then they could walk or be ferried by the “circulator” trams over I-285, across the pedestrian bridge to the complex.

And once they get to the complex, they wouldn’t be dropped off at the stadium gate. They would be at one end of a long pedestrian-only boulevard with hints of Atlantic Station: restaurants, shops, mixed development.

At the other end of the boulevard, the stadium. All they have to do to get there is walk the promenade, passing all those cash registers.

People staying at any of the hotels in the area of the district could also get ferried there, Leithead said. Or to the Cobb Energy Center one night, if they want to make a weekend of it.

“We think the return on investment here is magnificent,” Leithead said.

Cobb County Commission Chairman Tim Lee was also enthusiastic.

“It’s going to be transformational in the way people get moved around that community,” Lee said.

Much remains incomplete. The county and the district together are committing $24 million toward transportation improvements that were not already in the region’s budget. The pedestrian bridge will take up $3.5 million. Other desires, such as a dedicated ramp from the coming Northwest Corridor express lanes on I-75, could eat up the balance with lightning speed.

The AJC on Friday obtained a draft transportation plan drawn up by Cobb County, but in listing mostly projects that are already scheduled, it only serves to emphasize how much is yet to be planned.

Both Lee and Leithead said they are open to going back to the well in the future to request more transportation funding if the right transportation plan arises. Neither mentioned more tax increases.

“I realize there’s a lot of traffic in that area now, and I realize the Braves are going to add in the mix,” Leithead said. “But we’ve got three years and beyond” to come up with solutions.
Well this I can see.If they do more to develop the area as a DESTINATION then yes,people will stay more in the area.
I stll think they are loosing out on all the tourist ad conventioneers that will come to Atlanta that usually go to the a game as something else to do in the city.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:03 PM
 
30,554 posts, read 29,000,343 times
Reputation: 11416
I don't worry about Cobb. Those folks know how to take care of business.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Marietta, Georgia
178 posts, read 563,117 times
Reputation: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by afonega1 View Post
Well this I can see.If they do more to develop the area as a DESTINATION then yes,people will stay more in the area.
I stll think they are loosing out on all the tourist ad conventioneers that will come to Atlanta that usually go to the a game as something else to do in the city.
Tourists, maybe. Conventions, no. Cumberland is pretty big on conventions as it is. Plus, does every tourist stay downtown or look for cheaper hotels near Atlanta? The way I see it, Grandma and Grandpa rent a hotel room in Cumberland, drive to downtown, get an Atlanta pass using the day to see the sights downtown, drive back to their hotel, walk to a Braves game and call it a night. Though, if there is a convention in town during the Braves games, parking won't be that easy. When conventions are in the Galleria, which is indeed mainly a convention center, the four story deck and the three, three story decks around are usually packed out.
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Old 11-17-2013, 10:04 PM
 
1,114 posts, read 2,079,737 times
Reputation: 701
Quote:
Originally Posted by samiwas1 View Post
Seriously. I keep seeing the quote "We were underserved by about 5,000 parking spots at Turner Field". If the new spot better serves with 6,000 spots, then that would mean Turner Field had a maximum of 1,000 spots. Yet, the gold and orange lots alone have over 2,000 spaces based on my count.

If you're going to expect everyone to arrive by car, you should at least plan for it and not count on the lots of the mall, CEPAC, and office parks, which very well could already be full with office dwellers or other events.
They have 6,110 across the 4 main lots & another 1,863 in auxillary lots:
Parking Lot Events | Turner Field Special Events

They're going to be much more dependent on buses and non-affiliated lots unless the expectation is a smaller crowd in general.
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