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Old 07-01-2014, 03:13 PM
 
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I posted this on the weather forum but it didn't generate much interest, but I think it's a really interesting topic.

Let's say the Appalachian mountains are 4,000 feet higher on average. That means Brasstown bald (the highest point in Georgia) is now nearly 9,000 feet and most of Georgia Blue Ridge mountains are in the 6,000-8,000 foot range. The mountains in nearby NC would be higher than 10,000 feet in some areas.

How would this change the climate of the Atlanta area. I assume our elevation would be a lot higher- maybe around 3-4,000 feet. Would we be cooler? And would the higher mountains create a rain shadow making Atlanta drier on average.

What do you think?
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Old 07-01-2014, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Georgia
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Atlanta would be cooler with the higher elevation, but I don't think it would be a huge temperature difference. The effect of the wedge may be stronger, but I doubt it. I also don't think there would be a rain-shadow for us since we get almost all our moisture/rain from the south, west, or east. North Carolina and Virginia, however, would definitely be rain-shadowed.
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Old 07-01-2014, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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tough to tell...

thoughts to ponder...

Higher altitude mountains to the north of us would cause the air to cool as it rose, which would mean more rain in the northern exurbs. It would probably mean our rivers would run deeper and faster.

The air over the mountains themselves would remain cooler and wouldn't heat up as much during the day. This means less air would rise, so the low pressure system in that area would be lessened. This might affect how storms travel north from the gulf, but I can't say for sure how.
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Old 07-01-2014, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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If the elevation of Atlanta really does increase to around 4,000 ft ASL then our climate would be similar to Highlands, NC. Highs around 80 in summer instead of 90. We don't get much of a rain shadow effect here due to prevailing winds and likely wouldn't have that increased at all.
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:18 PM
 
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The Appalachians used to be about the size of the rockies, so if we could go back and see what the climate was like then it would give us some clues.
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Ono Island, Orange Beach, AL
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Who the heck knows... NOBODY.
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Old 07-01-2014, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alco89 View Post
Atlanta would be cooler with the higher elevation, but I don't think it would be a huge temperature difference. The effect of the wedge may be stronger, but I doubt it. I also don't think there would be a rain-shadow for us since we get almost all our moisture/rain from the south, west, or east. North Carolina and Virginia, however, would definitely be rain-shadowed.
Well in this scenario you're missing all the mountains are much higher in height. This includes the mountain in North Carolina, which is also somewhat shielded by lower mountains further south in Georgia...
More rain comes from the warm most gulf air to the south. The higher the mountains are to the north the more a small rain shadow effect will emerge.

So you can expect there to be some differences from that comparison.
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