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Old 06-09-2015, 12:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Atlanta has some unique advantages being in the east, closer to the east coast population and being centrally located. Hartsfield-Jackson is a big advantage. And its the only really big metro in a large area. Its a good ways to Miami, Houston, Dallas, Chicago, Detroit and DC.

Atlanta will do fine if Atlanta takes care of its infrastructure issues. It hasn't in recent years. If Atlanta doesn't, then expansions and new businesses will look, not just to Houston and Dallas and Miami, but also to Charlotte, Raleigh, Nashville and Cincinnati.
Job Growth is higher in Atlanta than it is in Houston at the moment(both in raw numbers and especially percentage). Perhaps Houston should worry also. They're subpar compared to where they were at just a year ago.

And Atlanta has higher percentage job growth than every city you mention except Dallas which continues to storm through the night. Clearly, it's not a problem of attracting companies. Pop. growth will rise again with this new boom of job growth. Atlanta's 2008-2014 period was just a weak time for it because of the recession. I think people are going to be shocked at Atlanta's population growth over the next few years.
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Old 06-09-2015, 12:38 PM
bu2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Cincinnati? Seems to be an odd mention alongside Atlanta's other Sunbelt peers.
They're relatively large, very centrally located, have pretty good infrastructure (except for their Ohio River bridges) and have a lot of major companies-10 from the Fortune 500, putting them tied with Denver for 10th on this list (Atlanta is tied for 6th-think this is for 2014 but site doesn't specifically say).
Cities Hosting the Most Fortune 500 Companies.
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Old 06-09-2015, 12:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
They're relatively large, very centrally located, have pretty good infrastructure (except for their Ohio River bridges) and have a lot of major companies-10 from the Fortune 500, putting them tied with Denver for 10th on this list (Atlanta is tied for 6th-think this is for 2014 but site doesn't specifically say).
Cities Hosting the Most Fortune 500 Companies.
Yeah but it's still a Rust Best legacy city along the lines of Cleveland and St. Louis, all of which have decent infrastructure and sizable corporate bases. More importantly, it's stagnant with respect to growth and it doesn't retain and attract young educated professionals like the Sunbelt cities. Again, it was just odd for it to be grouped with the likes of Charlotte, Nashville, and Raleigh. Now had you said Columbus OH, that would have fit since it's almost like a Sunbelt city amongst Rustbelt cities.
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:18 PM
bu2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Yeah but it's still a Rust Best legacy city along the lines of Cleveland and St. Louis, all of which have decent infrastructure and sizable corporate bases. More importantly, it's stagnant with respect to growth and it doesn't retain and attract young educated professionals like the Sunbelt cities. Again, it was just odd for it to be grouped with the likes of Charlotte, Nashville, and Raleigh. Now had you said Columbus OH, that would have fit since it's almost like a Sunbelt city amongst Rustbelt cities.

Charlotte is an odd one in that group in that it doesn't have a major research university like Nashville and Raleigh. They succeed in spite of that.

Cincinnati is a bit of rust belt, but it has grown consistently (even if slowly), unlike St. Louis, Cleveland, Pittsburg and Detroit. It was never quite so much heavy manufacturing. I mentioned them because they have the central location as well as a decent size and could be attractive to some distribution/retail type businesses. 3 of their largest are Kroger, Macy's and Proctor and Gamble.
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
Charlotte is an odd one in that group in that it doesn't have a major research university like Nashville and Raleigh. They succeed in spite of that.
Neither does Dallas or Orlando, but clearly Charlotte fits in the Sunbelt grouping over Cincinnati.

Quote:
Cincinnati is a bit of rust belt, but it has grown consistently (even if slowly), unlike St. Louis, Cleveland, Pittsburg and Detroit. It was never quite so much heavy manufacturing. I mentioned them because they have the central location as well as a decent size and could be attractive to some distribution/retail type businesses. 3 of their largest are Kroger, Macy's and Proctor and Gamble.
True, but they've also been experiencing some hemorrhaging of business due to its shrinking airport and don't attract new corporate relocations like Atlanta, Charlotte, and Nashville. I honestly don't think Atlanta will lose any ground to Rustbelt cities in the near future; the biggest competition will come from its other Sunbelt counterparts.
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Yeah but it's still a Rust Best legacy city along the lines of Cleveland and St. Louis, all of which have decent infrastructure and sizable corporate bases.
Cincinnati isn't really a rust belt city. It's an old city, yes and saw similar declines that all cities suffered in te 20th Century etc, but overall, it's economy has moved along... just not at sun belt levels.
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JoeP View Post
Cincinnati isn't really a rust belt city. It's an old city, yes and saw similar declines that all cities suffered in te 20th Century etc, but overall, it's economy has moved along... just not at sun belt levels.
It's a Rust Belt city for sure and I don't know of any definitions of the region that exclude it; Columbus is the large Ohio city which truly isn't Rust Belt. Cincinnati just didn't have as big of a bust as Detroit, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, etc.
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Old 06-09-2015, 04:34 PM
 
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It's a Rust Belt city for sure and I don't know of any definitions of the region that exclude it; Columbus is the large Ohio city which truly isn't Rust Belt. Cincinnati just didn't have as big of a bust as Detroit, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, etc.
My point is that it's not rust belt like any of it's "rust belt" peers. It was never a heavy industrial center like Pittsburgh (steel and other metals) Cleveland (steel and auto) and of course the auto industrial cities.
And because of that, it doesn't have the scars that they do it. But yes Columbus is more aligned with sun belt cities.
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Old 06-10-2015, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Jonesboro
3,644 posts, read 3,672,976 times
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Saintmarks
Your comment about all of the various Georgia micropolitan areas that are losing population is spot on. I've noticed & been concerned about that fact for quite a while.
Each of our neighboring states, except for Florida, contain a number of similarly declining or stagnant micropolitan &/ metropolitan areas.
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Old 06-10-2015, 10:05 AM
bu2
 
17,677 posts, read 8,796,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atler8 View Post
Saintmarks
Your comment about all of the various Georgia micropolitan areas that are losing population is spot on. I've noticed & been concerned about that fact for quite a while.
Each of our neighboring states, except for Florida, contain a number of similarly declining or stagnant micropolitan &/ metropolitan areas.
Its pretty similar around the country. Agricultural areas are losing people.
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