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Old 04-30-2017, 06:12 AM
 
6,469 posts, read 5,708,606 times
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Quote:
Cagle said he would quickly appoint an economic development liaison to work with businesses to streamline permitting, and he said he’d hit the road to recruit companies around the nation and the globe with an emphasis on targeting high-tech firms.

“We’ve been successful in being the Hollywood of the South,” he said, “but now we will be the Silicon Valley of the South.”

His 500,000 job creation goal is lofty: Deal put economic development at the center of his campaign, and he said he created more than 319,000 private-sector jobs in his first term.

Casting the I-85 bridge collapse as a “wakeup call,” Cagle said he’d order a new 10-year transportation plan that would rank which roads and bridges most need improvements and identify new corridors to build. He expressed support for more reversible lanes, tunnels and even elevated routes.

“We have to be willing to go up and go under if that is what is going to be required,” said Cagle. “There is nothing that is off the table. It is that important. We cannot afford to be unproductive as a state because we are constantly sitting in congestion.”

He would pursue his tax cut in his first legislative session as governor by increasing the amount that Georgians can deduct from their income tax returns. His proposal would call for the first $12,000 of taxable income for a family of four to be tax-exempt and an increase in standard deductions as well.

And Cagle wants to vastly expand the network of about 40 college and career academies around the state, with the goal of driving down the high school dropout rate. And he said he’ll pour more state resources into boosting third-grade reading proficiency.
Georgia 2018: Casey Cagle is running for governor | Political Insider blog
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Old 04-30-2017, 06:16 AM
 
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It will be interesting to see how the I85 bridge collapse is used in the election. Some candidates will promise more transit and others will promise more asphalt. It could end up being a mini referendum on ATL's current plans.
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Old 04-30-2017, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Seattle
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Cagle didn't mention transit here for political reasons I guess, but he's definitely into expanding that, too.

He seems generally less loony and scary to me than other Republicans, and he emphasizes transportation investment rather than social regression, so unless a Democrat has a chance, I hope he wins.
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Old 04-30-2017, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Historic West End
4,457 posts, read 4,008,517 times
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Ugh!!! Where is the mention of transit dumb dumb! I hope the State flip back blue. The Republicans has had their chance. We need pro active leaders and not re active. These road failure are God signs to get them out. Politician will no longer be able to ignore Atlanta tranisit systems problems. Why would a business and tourist want to come here, if you are stuck in traffic for hours a day.
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Old 04-30-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: In your feelings
2,199 posts, read 1,725,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airforceguy View Post
He expressed support for more reversible lanes
I must now dedicate my life to helping his opponent win.
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Old 04-30-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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He has somewhat of a point about reversible lanes. The interstates (and 400) are often a parking lot on one side, and freely flowing, with unused capacity on the other side. If a few of the lanes in the middle could switch direction in the morning and evening, it would more efficiently use the freeway space to get more optimized capacity out of it.
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Old 04-30-2017, 02:20 PM
 
6,695 posts, read 6,308,107 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlwarrior View Post
Ugh!!! Where is the mention of transit dumb dumb! I hope the State flip back blue. The Republicans has had their chance. We need pro active leaders and not re active. These road failure are God signs to get them out. Politician will no longer be able to ignore Atlanta tranisit systems problems. Why would a business and tourist want to come here, if you are stuck in traffic for hours a day.
Cagle did mention transit in the interview.

His mention of transit was excerpted out of the interview at/near the bottom of the article...

Quote:
Here are some excerpts from the interview:

On his support for transit:

“First we have to determine where the needs are and what the consumers are willing to pay, and we have to be willing to put the needed resources behind the build-out. State funding is certainly not off the table.”
Cagle has also talked of expanding transit throughout the Atlanta region and the North Georgia region by way of a state takeover and privatization of MARTA. Cagle particularly talked about possibly utilizing this approach to expanding transit while talking to business groups (like the Georgia Chamber of Commerce) immediately after his most recent re-election to the Lt. governor's office in 2014.

Though in the current political environment in a still fairly deeply conservative state in Georgia that was carried by Donald Trump in the 2016 Presidential Election with appeals to deeply conservative exurban rural and exurban voters who are generally very adverse to conversations about transit expansion in metro Atlanta (particularly MARTA expansion), one should not be surprised if the subject of expanding transit is not at the forefront of the 2018 gubernatorial campaign, particularly during the primary process on the Republican side of the spectrum.

Republican politicians like Georgia Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp are not going to win by talking at length about urban transit expansion during a GOP primary process dominated by deeply conservative rural and exurban voters who despise transit and most anything urban.

If a moderately-conservative Republican candidate like Casey Cagle or Georgia House Speaker David Ralston or maybe even Georgia State Senator Hunter Hill makes it out of what promises to be a bruising GOP primary, we likely may hear more about transit expansion from the Republican side during the general election campaign.

But if a much more conservative candidate that appeals strongly to deeply-conservative rural and exurban voters like Brian Kemp, Michael Williams, Nick Ayers, Josh McKoon, etc, wins the 2018 Georgia Gubernatorial Primary, not only are we likely not to hear much about transit expansion from the GOP side in the general election but we are also likely to see some significant movement away from the issue of transit expansion on the GOP side. We are also likely to see and hear some negative campaigning and demagoguery about existing transit (particularly MARTA) that aims to generate a maximized amount of turnout from transit-averse rural and exurban voters for Republican candidates for statewide and state legislative offices.
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Old 04-30-2017, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Prescott, AZ
5,559 posts, read 3,371,187 times
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Does Cagle have any specific plans on creating jobs, or is just going to hope the economy keeps growing without any (real) changes, and take responsibility for that?

Edit: There's also the standard "we'll cut taxes but somehow make everything work better anyway!" promise.

Last edited by fourthwarden; 04-30-2017 at 03:19 PM..
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Old 05-03-2017, 12:09 AM
 
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Some recent news and updates in the 2018 Georgia Gubernatorial Race:

"Georgia 2018: An early split in governor’s race over mass transit" (Atlanta Journal-Constitution/Political Insider)
Georgia 2018: An early split in governor’s race over mass transit | Political Insider blog
Quote:
There are three announced Republican candidates in the race for governor – and three starkly different positions on transit.
Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, who launched his campaign on Sunday, has emerged as a forceful advocate of mass transit. Saying the I-85 bridge collapse was a “wakeup call,” Cagle said he would order a 10-year transportation plan that would explore whether to funnel state funding into MARTA.

“First we have to determine where the needs are and what the consumers are willing to pay, and we have to be willing to put the needed resources behind the build-out,” Cagle said in an interview. “State funding is certainly not off the table.”

Somewhere in the middle of the divide is state Sen. Hunter Hill, who jumped in the race last week. He said he would look to invest tax dollars in “high-return activities” but that he’s not certain if adding or extending fixed-rail lines is the right step.

“I’m not going to focus just on transit, but certainly transit is something I want to focus on. What I can tell you is that we’re going to deliver results,” said Hill, who represents a Buckhead-based district. “Transit is going to be a part of that. We’ve got to double if not triple our investment in transportation, and that’s going to be our goal.”

On the other side of the debate is Secretary of State Brian Kemp, who entered the race in March and recently sounded a skeptical note on state funding for MARTA’s system.

“I think we’ve got to continue to be innovative — and also have those local communities buying in to what they’re doing,” Kemp told the Gainesville Times. “People in Atlanta clearly will pay for congestion relief, but I’m not so sure that people outside of Atlanta will.”

"Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp strikes populist tone in run for governor" (Gainesville Times)
Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp strikes populist tone in run for governor
Quote:
Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp is striking a populist tone in his 2018 run for governor, touting his record as a small business owner, prioritizing rural Georgia and adopting a “Georgians first” attitude to state spending and illegal immigrants.

The seven-year secretary of state sat down with The Times on Monday to discuss these issues and others involved in his campaign to be Georgia’s third Republican governor...

...A POPULIST MESSAGE...

...But unlike Trump, don’t look for an infrastructure spending campaign from Kemp — especially in the Atlanta area.

“I think we’ve got to continue to be innovative — and also have those local communities buying in to what they’re doing,” Kemp said. “People in Atlanta clearly will pay for congestion relief, but I’m not so sure that people outside of Atlanta will.”

He noted that congestion is clearly a problem in metropolitan areas, but not in most areas of the state. In general, Kemp talked much more about encouraging private sector innovation than public cash for infrastructure.

“Our life is going to change very quickly with technology now,” Kemp said. “When you think about five years from now or even 10 years from now, when we’re really having self-driving cars or we have self-driving trucks, what’s that going to do to the volume of vehicles on our roads if you could have more trucks traveling at night versus during the day?

“What other kinds of innovation are we going to have? Everybody talks about expanding MARTA and high-speed rail, but there’s innovative things like the hyperloop out there that could make all those obsolete if they actually come forth and actually work.”

"Casey Cagle Announces 2018 Gubernatorial Bid" (GeorgiaPol.com)
https://www.georgiapol.com/2017/05/0...rnatorial-bid/


"Georgia 2018: Cagle opens campaign with show of force" (Atlanta Journal-Constitution/Political Insider)
Georgia 2018: Cagle opens campaign with show of force | Political Insider blog
Quote:
Republican Casey Cagle opened his campaign for governor with a show of force designed to send a message that he’s the candidate to beat in the 2018 race.

The lieutenant governor’s speech Sunday to 800 supporters at a concert-turned-rally echoed many of the same policy platforms that he rolled out in an AJC interview a few days earlier. But the tone and the style of the campaign roll-out also sent a signal about how he’ll orchestrate his bid to succeed a term-limited Nathan Deal.

There were prominent speaking roles for his wife Nita and son Jared, a clear signal the campaign isn’t afraid to deploy them as surrogates.

The audience was dotted with a range of Republican operatives, activists and office-holders, including most of the Senate GOP caucus. Nearly all of them were there to publicly endorse him.

And after a concert by two artists from Collective Soul, Cagle was introduced by Monica Kaufman Pearson, the former WSB-TV anchor and a lifelong Democrat who called Cagle a personal friend. Her presence sent a message that he already had his eye on a broader electorate.

Just as telling was what was missing from the event. Cagle’s speech had little of the base-pleasing red meat that’s typical at Georgia Republican rallies – and that he has routinely used in past elections. He made no mention of Democrats and steered clear of any reference to his Republican rivals aside from saying he would avoid attacking his challengers.

“I am not going to be running a campaign that’s going to tear someone else down,” he said, adding that candidates who focus on attacks “don’t have much.”

That pledge will surely be put to the test over the next 18 or so months. Cagle might be the presumptive front-runner, but his entrance in the race hasn’t cleared the field. Secretary of State Brian Kemp and state Sen. Hunter Hill are already in, and a half-dozen other GOP contenders are considering a run.

Cagle supporters are keeping a particularly close eye on two potential candidates.

The first is Former Rep. Jack Kingston, the Republican runner up in the 2014 U.S. Senate race and an avowed Trump loyalist. The second is Nick Ayers, the one-time Sonny Perdue aide and confidante of Vice President Mike Pence who could become a fundraising force. Both have signaled they are considering a run.

Democrats are gearing up for what could be a stiff challenge. House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams is widely expected to run, and several other Democrats are eyeing the race. They hope that Donald Trump’s election will help rev up enthusiasm in next year’s vote, much like it has transformed Georgia’s 6th District race.

Cagle’s campaign is already trying to strike what could be a precarious balance on Trump.

In an interview, he said he supports the president’s agenda – but stressed his independence. And at his campaign kickoff speech, he avoided mention of* Trump. Instead, he heaped praise on another Republican: Gov. Deal.

“I’ve been able to partner with him to make Georgia the No. 1 place in the nation to do business,” he said.

"Kemp Endorsed By Over 50 Rural County Officials" (GeorgiaPol.com)
https://www.georgiapol.com/2017/05/0...nty-officials/
Quote:
We said earlier that [Georgia] Secretary of State Brian Kemp would be playing to rural Georgia in the 2018 gubernatorial election, probably hoping to recreate Donald Trump’s path to victory in the 2016 Republican presidential primary.

After rolling out his “Georgia First” campaign message, it looks like he is on to phase two on his plan: consolidate support from local officials.

Today, he announced endorsements from over 50 county officials from mostly rural areas. The only populous metro Atlanta counties with endorsers are Gwinnett and Hall.

"Georgia 2018: Abrams files paperwork to run for governor" (Atlanta Journal-Constitution/Political Insider)
Stacey Abrams prepares to run for Georgia Governor | Political Insider blog
Quote:
House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams filed paperwork Tuesday to run for governor, marking the first step toward an expected bid for the state’s highest office.

Abrams would become the highest-profile Democrat in the race to succeed Gov. Nathan Deal and her campaign would seek to capitalize on the same angst over Donald Trump that is propelling Jon Ossoff in Georgia’s 6th District race.

Although her aides said the filing kicks off an exploration phase, Abrams is all but certain to run for higher office. She has hired staffers and crisscrossed the state readying for an announcement.

Several of her constituents are sure she’s running: One has already announced a bid for her state House seat and others could soon jump in.

The 43-year-old would instantly become the Democratic frontrunner in a wide-open race to replace Deal. Three Republicans are already in the race, including Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp, and about a half-dozen others are considering a bid.

A graduate of Yale Law School, Abrams has represented an Atlanta-based district in the Georgia House since her 2006 victory and in 2011 was elected her party’s leader in the House.

She’s built a national profile as a leading voice for the party in the South, and she’s raised millions of dollars for Democratic causes. Should she run, she’s also aiming for the history books: She would be the first African-American governor in Georgia – and the first black female statewide officeholder in the state’s history.

Although she’s given fiery speeches at town halls and last year’s Democratic National Committee, in the Georgia statehouse she has carved out a reputation for working with Republicans rather than outright opposing GOP initiatives.

More recently, she has taken on kinship care as a cause, often talking about the problems her parents had navigating the legal maze after they took in a granddaughter to raise.

Abrams might be best known for the New Georgia Project voter registration group that she founded. It aims to register hundreds of thousands of left-leaning voters within the next decade – and has become a favorite target for state Republicans.

She also has another claim to fame: She’s a prolific author of romance novels under the pen name Selena Montgomery, and she wrote her first book while in her third year at Yale Law. She’s been known to insert characters from the Georgia political scene into her work.

Abrams likely won’t run unopposed in the Democratic primary. State Rep. Stacey Evans and Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson are among the Democrats eyeing a run, and both would bring a vastly different approach to the race.

Abrams has long advocated a strategy to mobilize and energize minority voters and others who are already likely to cast ballots with Democrats. Her campaign would likely try to expand the electorate by taking aim at low-propensity voters who rarely head to the ballot boxes.

Evans and Tomlinson appear likely to side with Democrats who hope to take up the middle ground and craft policies to appeal to white voters – including independents and moderate Republicans – who helped Deal and the GOP sweep every statewide office the last two elections.

But Abrams won’t be easily toppled in a Democratic race. She’s a proven fundraiser who holds an advantage in any primary: Black women make up the biggest bloc in Georgia’s Democratic electorate.

Her campaign-in-waiting is poised to spring when she formally announces, and she has already lined up support from politicians and advocates. Among them is former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm, who called Abrams a “Southern innovator” who helped build the infrastructure that could eventually flip the state.
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Old 05-03-2017, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,243 posts, read 4,970,593 times
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Going to be interesting to see how much of a liability it will be to have Trump's name associated with a candidate. I get the feeling some of these candidates will be regretting that come election time

I like that Cagle isn't playing the partisan BS game
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